Civil Disobedience

Topics: Martin Luther King, Jr., Civil disobedience, Government Pages: 3 (711 words) Published: March 16, 2015
Amaial Mullick
Mrs. Pelosi
AP Language
March 14 2015
Civil Disobedience
The views on the prose of civil disobedience are ones subject to skepticism and judgment. Thoreau displays a sense of anti-authority encouraging readers to discern their responsibility by refusing to support injustice within the government as well as uphold their own rights as the public. Thoreau attempts to persuade the reader to consciously observe the governments that suppress them, as well as respect the rights of those around them in effort to create a prolific society.

The excerpt itself is individualistic, and persuasive, using incisive logic in a manner to affirm that should question the state and if needed demand a superior system if necessary. Productive societies as Thoreau elucidates function around mutual respect of the public, and the practicality of governments in regard to the decisions made for the people. (lines 6-10) Thoreau adamantly strives to persuade individuals to view themselves as higher than the state, and frame a government deriving from power of the people themselves. Successful productive societies root from states that view the end as justifying the means. States, which immerse a sense of civil disobedience if for the greater good and hold governments responsible for the injustices they commit.

The eloquence of Thoreau’s piece permits the reader to experience a sense of trust within the author, the sensation that Thoreau is lecturing them due to the pacing of the speech itself. The didactic, potent diction emphasizes an aura of intelligence and inducement. As if a demand for a better government can be met through a form of passive disobedience. Citizens possess a moral obligation to take action when they feel the state has been unjust, and not prioritized the needs of the people. Duty to protest against the baleful is equally an obligation as support of righteous.

Thoreau’s use of allusion (lines 18-20) allows the reader to correlate the argument...
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