Preview

Citizen Kane Rhetorical Analysis

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
110 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Citizen Kane Rhetorical Analysis
The timeline of Citizen Kane is anything but linear. The film begins by showing us the last moments of Kane's life. Consequently, almost everything after that point is comprised of multiple flashbacks and first hand accounts of his life. The only exception to this is the timeline of Thompson, a reporter finishing a new-real on Kane, as he travels around asking the people closest to him for their accounts in the hopes of understanding Kane's last word, Rosebud. Thompson eventually gives up on figuring out Rosebud because no one can offer any "useful" information, the viewers just end up realize what Kane went through and what it did to

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The” Citizen Kane” speech given by Charles Foster Kane in 1941, who was campaigning for Governor starts off his speech by addressing his audience, attacking his opponent by using various fallacies of illogical argument.. First he starts off with blaming “boss Jim W. Getty and his political machine” the techniques that are used here are for the propose of making himself appear stronger, in his views and political agendas. This type of fallacy is called scapegoating, blaming the problems on his opponent’s convictions and building confidence in the listeners. Kane also uses Ad hominen, which is where the candidate is verbally attacking his opponent rather than the argument. Kane begins begging the question by insinuating that he will be elected. An example of a rhetorical device would be alliteration, When he talks about “the slum child, the working man, the underprivileged, underpaid and underfed.” He has a political bias against his opponent Getty’s, suggesting by his speech that…

    • 527 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    This passage provides a very powerful moment in which the narrator is informed of the extent of Tyler's power and control. During this scene, Tyler stresses the importance of "honor" while he threatens to castrate the police commissioner. Although the idea of this passage is very aggressive, the tone of the passage is calm and respectful, as Tyler uses diction such as "esteemed honor" and "your honor". While using blackmail as a method of insurance, he reminds the commissioner that honor is more important than the individual. This value reappears throughout Fight Club as well. We see space monkeys sacrificing themselves for homework assignments and chaotic operations; they are taught to put Fight Club and Project Mayhem before themselves. The passage also…

    • 601 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    One of the most inspiring movies of all time in terms of cinema, The Godfather directed by Francis Ford Coppola, uses a style of cinema that was unheard of until the creation of this movie. Coppola, a master of tone, uses many different forms of cinematography in order to make the audience feel the emotions in which he wants them to feel. Through different forms of cinematography, along with different styles of rhetorical elements in dialogue, Coppola was able to effectively portray the post-colonialism oppression against immigrants while explaining the necessary respect when dealing with the Italian mafia in order to achieve an effective argument in this situation.…

    • 1724 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Who is Charles Foster Kane (Orson Welles) and what where the defining moments of his life? These are the questions that lead Thompson (William Alland) and the viewer on a captivating goose chase through the memories of Kane’s closest associates. Like the many possible meanings contained within the word kane, such as the Irish interpretation “little battler”, the Japanese translation of “money” and “gold”, the Welsh’s interpretation of “beautiful”, and the Hawaiian’s definition as “man”, friends and family each had there own interpretations of Charles Foster Kane. Collectively, these views show Kane as a character that was thrown into a position of power and money, and that underneath the façade of glamour and monetary possessions, he was a lonely and complex individual deprived of a normal childhood experience.…

    • 843 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In his novel Into the wild , Jon Krakauer uses rhetorical devices to convey that Christopher McCandless was not a suicidal kid. McCandless's quest for the truth in the wild is something that everyone goes through, including the author himself. Krakauer writes to the majority of his audience who believes that McCandless set out on a death wish, leading him to his fate. He uses his own story to prove that Christopher McCandless was not who the audience perceived him to be. Krakauer uses logic and emotions to show that he and McCandless had similar traits. McCandless, like anyone else, was searching for truth.…

    • 735 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In the book “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” the author, Mark Twain, is trying to convey a general message that to promise not to do a thing is a best way to make someone do it, and Tom Sawyer does a great job at taking advantage of gullible people and doing such. We see this happen when Tom has to whitewash a fence as a punishment and is pretending to have fun to make the other children jealous.…

    • 78 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In the 1957’s movie 12 Angry Men, it is about twelve jurors who have to come to a verdict whether or not the young boy is guilty for murdering his father. All but one juror said guilty. In the movie we see that jurors are using the arguments made by the witnesses and evidence found which were presented in court to help justify their decision and come to a conclusion on whether he is or isn’t guilty for killing his father. During this deliberation we can see emotion, reason and sense of perception being used by each juror to decide upon their verdict. Some questions that were raised during the movie were, do we make decisions based on our emotion? To what extent does the juror show to be rational or irrational? And In what ways are the eyewitness…

    • 141 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The nonfiction novel In Cold Blood, written by Truman Capote, is a story based on the murders of Clutter family members. The novel is set in the quaint town of Holcomb, Kansas at the turn of the 1960’s where the novel explains in details of the motives and actions done by Dick Hickock and Perry Smith, the culprits. The novel illustrates the journey that Dick and Perry went through from the planning of the murders,to committing the actual murders of the Clutter’s on November 19, 1959, to their own deaths merely 6 years later. Throughout the novel, Capote uses a variety of writing strategies to keep the audience on the edge of their seats, despite the fact that Capote reveals the outcome of the supposed mystery within the first few pages of…

    • 1134 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Citizen Kane is a film open to many interpretations and analyses. It tells the story of its main character through the complex points of view of those who knew him. Or thought they knew him. The character of Charles Foster Kane is played by, and done so in an enigmatic performance, by Orson Welles. The intrinsic bias and prejudice of the “narrators” in this film creates conflicting accounts of who Charles Foster Kane really was. Kane was a private man; closely guarding his true identity, making it difficult to differentiate the private Kane from his public identity. Throughout the film’s development of Kane, several inconsistencies and contradictions arise in the depiction of the character’s personality. All of these issues make it difficult to form a solid portrayal of whom Kane actually was. However, there is enough evidence to conclude that Charles Foster Kane was a noble figure sabotaged by his own anti-social behavior and his search for love, his inability to find and provide it, and the way this haunted him to his dying day.…

    • 1327 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    When the main character, played by Welles himself, whispers "Rosebud" while lying on his deathbed at the beginning of the movie, little did audiences know they were about be taken on a unique cinematic journey never before traveled. Long after moviegoers left Citizen Kane's end credits rolling on the big screen as they exited the theater, they were most likely scratching their heads wondering what exactly they had just witnessed. In fact, as Barsam and Monahan point out, the plot and the way it was scripted and enacted were so radical for the 1940s that audiences, unprepared for what they were about to see and hear, were actually bewildered by the atypical storyline (2013, p. 146). However, even as unique as the narrative turned out to be, Citizen Kane is arguably more renowned for its avant-garde technical machinations involving new and diverse camera…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Citizen Kane Reaction

    • 268 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The movie is about the last word spoken by the famous American millionaire and newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane. In the whole movie, group of reporters try to solve the mystery behind the last word of Charles Foster Kane: “Rosebud”. As the reporter investigates further, we see the flashbacks from Kane’s life. Started from his childhood till the time he gets fame and then dying old and alone. A newspaper reporter starts to find the evidences of his life.…

    • 268 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    What I aim to do with this rhetorical analysis is bring forth to the reader a deeply immersive look at the rhetorical concepts present in the film The Truman Show. It is important for a viewer to fully understand the underlying messages and subtle undertones in between the lines, so to speak. The Truman Show is one man’s life being played out in a closed environment for the entertainment of the outside world. Most important to note, Truman Burbank has no clue that his whole life has been little more than just a television program produced on a grand scale to produce the image of reality in a dome. The Truman Show blends ethos, logos, and pathos together in a symphony of self-discovery and power over an adversary, whether physical or spiritual. It is one man’s journey from unknowing and subconscious subterfuge to self-awareness and vindication.…

    • 1536 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    During the speech "Charles Foster Kane Campaigns for Governor," I detected bias, fallacies, and a variety of rhetorical devices. From the beginning the speaker reveals a particular bias against the current Governor, Jim Gettys, by deliberately labeling his rule as 'evil domination'. This phrase indicates apparent bias by the Campaigner, who is in the same way biased about, but in favor of Kane, portraying him as a supporter of the common man. The campaigner bases his argument on his or her own personal preference but states no sustaining facts. In regards to a fallacy that were previously in use, I will identify that Kane did, in fact, demonstrate one of alliteration such as “…….I’ll do everything in my power to protect the underprivileged, the underpaid, and the underfed.” Not to mention a rhetorical device such as the one used in this statement: “…….to point out and make public the dishonest, the downright villainy of boss Jim W. Gettys’s political machine. These are only a diminutive assembly of the feature cases in point.…

    • 407 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    “The Dark Knight,” a movie directed and produced by Christopher Nolan, depicts the way a system of justice deals with terrorism. If an archetype is defined as a symbol that exists instinctively in the collective consciousness of the human race, the terrorism in Batman The Dark Knight represents an archetype through the violence, murder of the innocent, mayhem and mass destruction. Governments often lay down laws and procedures for a country to function, and to avoid anarchy. The laws promote wellness, equality, and justice, but sometimes even these entities of justice are forced to break the law for a greater good. In contemporary U.S. history, President Barack Obama, the head of one of the most powerful countries in the world, decided to introduce a select team of individuals into Pakistan, in an illegal manner, in order to kill Osama bin Laden, the head of an international Islamic terrorist group known as al-Qaeda. In the movie these two sides of justice are represented by two “knights.” On one side, Batman, who is constantly referred to as the dark knight and on the other Harvey Dent, who is referred to as the white knight. The words “white” and “dark” have two specific connotations, one which brings to mind the concept of light, an archetype that symbolizes purity, justice, hope, and clarity. The other invokes into mind the concept of darkness, an archetype which embodies fear, ignorance, despair, and the unknown. The use of this archetypical antithesis throughout the whole movie is an allusion to the two sides of justice: the “white side” and the “dark side.” Terrorism is represented by the criminal mastermind known as “The Joker,” a cynical clown that is very similar to Islamic terrorists, an archetype of the devil figure. The most prevalent real life terrorist in current world news is Osama bin Laden, the head of al Qaeda. He plans and orders attacks onto specific targets through suicide bombings, representing the notion…

    • 1596 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    "I would hope that when a woman goes into a physician, with a rape issue, that that physician will indeed ask her about perhaps her marriage was this pregnancy caused by normal relations in a marriage, or was it truly caused by a rape." - Idaho Senator Chuck Winder (New Republic)…

    • 3714 Words
    • 15 Pages
    Better Essays