Preview

Cindy Sherman

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
481 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Cindy Sherman
Paper Proposal
Cindy Sherman was one of the well known and most respected photographers in the late twentieth century. Rather than doing self portraits for her photographs, Sherman depicted herself in the roles of B- movie actresses. On one level, Sherman’s work appears to be subversively linked to ‘low’ art characterized by ‘b-grade’ film and photography, on another level, her work is regarded as the modernist ideal of the ‘high' art object. Sherman has raised challenging and important questions about the role and representation of women in society, the media and the nature of the creation of art. Sherman has been acclaimed as the subversive feminist that has boldly confronted issues concerning the female body. Even though some critics look at Cindy’s works as demining the women and exposing the women into low standards through her photographs, Cindy had a strong message for the viewers. In 1992 Sherman embarked on a series of photographs now referred to as "Sex Pictures." Sherman is not in any of these photographs for the first time in her career as an artist, yet she uses dolls and prosthetic body parts posed in highly sexual poses. She chose to often photograph up close and in color both female and male body parts which were purposely meant to shock the viewers. Sherman continued to work on these photographs for some time and continued to experiment with the use of dolls and other replacements for what had previously been herself. Critiques imply that the viewer is guilty for the negative readings of Sherman’s images. In a way Sherman’s constructed image of woman is innocent, and the way we interpret it is based on our social and cultural knowledge. Referring to the reaction of a gallery visitor who criticized Sherman for presenting women as sex objects, I would say that the visitor’s anger comes from a sense of his own involvement because the images speak not only to him but from him. Critiques depicted Sherman as a whore for producing such photographs but

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Edmonia Lewis

    • 1384 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Linda Nochlin’s essay Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists, pays critical attention to the way in which we look at art through a gender lens. The question is not whether women are capable of producing great art but rather why have they been kept in the shadows. Nochlins essay is a founding document of feminist art history that explores powerful relationship between gender and art and the history of dynamic tension. Edmonia Lewis is not only an example of a prolific female artist, but is a sculpture of African American and Native American decent. In Lewis’s sculptures we see stylistically neoclassic imagery with an important twist, she puts her own identity at the periphery. Lewis work encompasses themes of religion, freedom and slavery and while she sometimes depicts African, African American and Native American people in her sculptures, she more often neutralized her subjects race or ethnicity which made her art more acceptable to the social norms during the 19th century. In order to achieve professional fulfillment, women during this time had to deny their femininity but for Edmonia Lewis this extended even further into denying her culture, race and identity. Had Lewis not been a woman, had she not have been born from a Chippewa Indian mother nor an African father, would she have been celebrated more for her artistic genius?…

    • 1384 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Cindy Jackson.

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I would have to say that she has always looked to fit in. She never felt like herself growing up until she grew up and found herself. Her self esteem has always been low by her saying she never fit in with the cheerleaders. Her presentation is what is making her money now. She needs to look good to make good money. I think in her bio on her website she says things that don’t really pertain to the product and you get lost while reading it or at least I did, I got bored. She should say a little more about the product and what or how it came about. I don’t think she has a good self esteem and that is why she created this product to make her feel better about her own self. It was like she was trying to get her Barbie dolls life or the one she dreamed up for her Barbie doll. She wants woman to look at this product to feel better about themselves, when in all reality she looked at cosmetic surgery to feel better and then thought of a product to sell to try to make some money.…

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Cindy Sherman was one of the most know and well-respected photographers of the late 20th century. Sherman was born the youngest of five children in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. A short time after her birth, her family relocated to Huntington, Long Island where her father was an engineer and her mother was a teacher. She started off painting at a young age, but as time went on, she later transferred over to photography. Most of her photographs did include photos of herself, however, these “self-portraits” aren’t really self-portraits at all. During the 1990s, Sherman used prosthetic limbs and mannequins to create her Sex Pictures series. Sherman’s photographs brought up a number of question as to what role and representation women have in society.…

    • 208 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Before the late 19th century women were not accepted to study into official art academies, and any training they were allowed to have was that of the soft and delicate nature. This may be why that during the early years of the modern feminist art movement, the art often showed “raw” anger from the artist. “The Feminist Art Movement began with the idea that women’s experiences must be expressed through art, where they had previously been ignored or trivialized.” (Napikoski, L. 2011 ) The artists of this movements work showed a rebellion from femininity, and a desire to push the limits. Women artists began to protest at art galleries and institutions that would not accept them or their work. Some also started opening women’s learning facilities of their own, such as Judy Chicago did in 1971, when she established the Feminist Art program at Cal State Fresno. The…

    • 870 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In her essay “In, Around, and Afterthoughts”, Martha Rosler points out that, “Documentary, as we know it, carries (old information) about a group of powerless people to another group addressed as socially powerful (263). This statement is important to helping understand how documentary photos can make history. They are only able to do this when the images they express have enough power to call the audience to action to make a change. For example, in Rosemarie Garland Thomson’s “Seeing the Disabled”, she describes the Breast Cancer Fund documenting women daringly showing off their mastectomy scars in a set of advertisements called “Obsessed with Breasts” that imitated sexualized images of women in advertisements and publications such as Victoria’s Secret catalogs and Cosmopolitan magazine. In turn, the advertisements created controversy and opened a dialogue about breast cancer and the reality of women’s breasts compared to the way they were normally portrayed in the media (Thomson 365-367). This is a time where a documentary image created history, because it changed the rhetoric surrounding mastectomies and breast cancer. This is just a small example of the history documentary photography can…

    • 508 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Lorna Simpson

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Lorna Simpson has a very unique way of showing and narrating her works, and understandably follows the post conceptual artistic style. An ideal work day for her consists of shooting and printing photos in order to show them off in a gallery. The work that was focused on in the video rested on the issues of sexual or private activities in public places, such as work buildings, cars, parks, and public bathrooms. While at first these works look like a standard photograph, she engages the viewer past the surface and into the deeper meaning of her work. Lorna's work is not just about the picture, it is about the meaning, story, and narrative behind it -- the voyeurism and to be unnoticed, yet noticed at the same time. In one work of hers she grids together a picture of a work building with two clocks on it. The clocks represent the time for a man and a woman to meet for sex, while the buildings provide the public location of that meeting. The work portrayed is about descriptions of a beautiful city scape or landscape, and inscribing something else into it.…

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Georgia O'Keefe

    • 2338 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Georgia O 'Keefe is a famous American painter who painted beautiful flowers and landscapes. But she painted these images in such a way that many people believed she was portraying sexual imagery. "O 'Keefe 's depictions of flowers in strict frontality and enlarged to giant scale were entirely original in character . . . the view into the open blossoms evoked an image of the female psyche and invited erotic associations." (Joachimides 47) O 'Keefe denies these allegations and says that she "magnified the scale of the flower only to ensure people would notice them." (Haskell 203) O 'Keefe 's artwork was misinterpreted because of cultural prejudice, her non-traditional lifestyle, and gender bias art criticism. But despite these accusations, Georgia O 'Keefe 's artwork was not based on sexuality.…

    • 2338 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    For the first time, Cindy Sherman had decided to opt out of photographing herself in this series, and relies strictly on the replacement of dismembered mannequins as her models. In researching an explanation for her graphic art style, I encountered a website louellamartin.wordpress.com, where in an interview with John Zinsser, she defends her work by saying," I would hope that these images would make people comfort their own feelings about sex, pornography, or erotic images and their own bodies" (Zinsser…

    • 458 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Emma Goldman

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In January 1886 a 16YOA Jewish girl- Emma Goldman arrived to in New York City from St. Petersburg, Russia, where her parents ran a grocery store. As soon as immigration officials had examined her and approved her entry into the US, she hurried to Rochester, New York, where her half-sister lived. Emma was extremely independent-minded. Her father had tried to force her to marry when she was 15, saying when she protested that “all Jewish daughter needs to know is how to prepare gefulte fish, cut noodles fine, and give man plenty of children” Defying her father, Emma had flatly refused to marry. “I wanted to study, to know life, travel,” she explained years later. She had also found the harsh government of Russia Czar unbearable. Like most immigrants she expected the United States “the land of opportunity,” to be a kind of paradise on earth.…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Work of Cindy Sherman

    • 2881 Words
    • 12 Pages

    No other artist has ever made as extended or complex career of presenting herself to the camera as has Cindy Sherman. Yet, while all of her photographs are taken of Cindy Sherman, it is impossible to class call her works self-portraits. She has transformed and staged herself into as unnamed actresses in undefined B movies, make-believe television characters, pretend porn stars, undifferentiated young women in ambivalent emotional states, fashion mannequins, monsters form fairly tales and those which she has created, bodies with deformities, and numbers of grotesqueries. Her work as been praised and embraced by both feminist political groups and apolitical mainstream art. Essentially, Sherman's photography is part of the culture and investigation of sexual and racial identity within the visual arts since the 1970's. It has been said that, "The bulk of her work…has been constructed as a theater of femininity as it is formed and informed by mass culture…(her) pictures insist on the aporia of feminine identity tout court, represented in her pictures as a potentially limitless range of masquerades, roles, projections" (Sobieszek 229).…

    • 2881 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cindy Sherman and Laurie Anderson demonstrate art in the modern era by using two very unique forms of art while still maintaining their roles as two of the most influential artists of today. Cindy Sherman’s unique and innovative style of photographing herself in a majority of her photographs, which is her own form or style of photography. Her ability to transform herself and express various types of emotion in any of her photographs is what makes her matchless. Laurie Anderson is an innovative performance artist that has combined music and video art to create masterful pieces that encompass every emotion that is put into one piece to create an emotional boom effect. One might question if it’s sad or happy,…

    • 1635 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the 1980’s, female artist addressed the dominance of cultural perceptions regarding female agency, pleasure, and spectatorship. In order to make their voice heard in a white male dominant art industry, they created works of art from paintings to films that challenged the social stereotypes and ideologies about female identity. This essay will define these three perceptions and examine the artworks from artist such as Julie Dash, Kobena Mercer , and Jenny Saville. These artists paved a way for the feminist movement through the use of disturbing the normative constructions of femininity, racial identity, and the body.…

    • 776 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Cindy Sherman Analysis

    • 251 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Cindy Sherman was born on January 19th 1954, and is an American photographer who uses her portraits as social commentary- particularly on female stereotypes. She created her famous ‘Film Stills' work in 1977 and developed and progressed through her works since then. Throughout my art project, I have been mimicking her self portrait style when creating my photographs styled as ‘Rapunzel.’…

    • 251 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    “I still don’t understand how a gallerist and the director of an institution that is supposed to promote artists’ work could have, without even the slightest threat, on simple anonymous requests, and without really knowing my past and current work, decided to remove my work,” said artist Diane Ducruet, after a photo of her playfully kissing daughter was removed from the intimacy section of a gallery exhibition in Paris, after being accused of portraying child abuse or incest. The artist Richard Prince took a photo of Brooke Shields at age ten in the nude, whose purpose was to “question sexualized advertising images”. The photo was censored as child pornography. However advertising, such the well-known illustration of the Coppertone Girl, depicts…

    • 1023 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Before you distributed handouts to everyone in the class on Carolee Schneemann’s performance art “Interior Scroll” with the warning that it’s quite graphic, I remember thinking something along the lines of: “Oh no, it’s probably going to involve down there..” and sure enough, it was! My involvement with a counter-culture fashion has influenced me that in order to get your message across (and having that message linger in the observer’s mind), you most likely have to go “over the top.” Personally, art pieces or presentations that are extremely “out there” and “different” are extremely difficult for me to forget, especially if there was an intended message or feeling attached to them. Concerning “Interior Scroll,” I think the gross factor allows Schhneemann to convey her point very well – a point specifically about sexism. Even though she made this performance over thirty years ago, I think its relevance still applies today. I feel as though society today overly emphasizes sex which then leads to stipulating the notion of objectifying women. Despite this unhealthy obsession of “sex, sex, and more sex,” people are still grossed out when they see the insides of a woman (kind of like the reactions I saw from my classmates watching a mother give birth in my Honors class in high school). It was very clever of her to, literally, turn herself inside-out. I believe in this way, male viewers have been denied the power (and privilege) to fantasize about the female…

    • 251 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays