Child Labour In The 1800s

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During the 1800s, Great Britain was making great new changes to its nation new advances in technology, and a rapid growth in the population, especially, in urban areas of the country which resulted the increase of supply and demand. Factory owners only had one problem they didn’t have enough workers, and didn’t want to take lots of money out of their pockets to provide new employees. The solution was finally found they found people who could be paid the cheapest wages, work long hours, and are fast learners, children. These children were working in factories and mines things such as that as young as the age of six years old. Child labor was the momentous component to the Britain Industrial Revolution succeeding.

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Moreover, these hours were not regularly during the year or consistent from day-to-day. The family also affected the number of hours the children worked depending on whether they had a family occasions to attend. Tasks performed by children before the Industrial Revolution are simple compared to the jobs young adolescents worked during the Industrial Revolution.“Many children worked 16 hour days under atrocious conditions, as their elders did,”(Cody). Instead of receiving an education most low class children labored in factories and mines in order to support their family. Child labor covered a broad spectrum of occupations. “One of the job aspects of Victorian child labor was the dreadful working conditions.”(http://www.victorianchildren.org/victorian-child-labor/) This was especially amplified in the coal mines. It was dull in the mines, making it difficult to see and now and again would bring about lasting issues with sight from the constant burden on the eyes. Considering that Victorian children would work from 12 to 18 hours a day it is anything, but difficult to perceive how respiratory issues could emerge. There was a perpetual state of ruckus, and rodent infestation was exceptionally normal in the mines. The instance of Martha Appleton in 1859 highlights the ghastly working conditions a huge number of children all over Britain persevered through consistently in the nineteenth century. As a 13-year-old material laborer ,Martha was employed to grab free cotton from underneath hardware. On one specific day, Martha blacked out and got her cleared out hand in an unguarded machine. In the mishap, all her fingers were disjoined. Martha lost her occupation since she was no longer able to work

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