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Child Abuse Effects

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Child Abuse Effects
Effects of Child Abuse Growing up is an essential time for children because they look to their parents for safety, love, security, support, understanding, and nurturance. In addition, children learn a lot about relationships, life, models of good behavior, and early attachments are formed. When child abuse occurs in the home, it has a major impact on the child that drastically changes the family dynamic and trust is violated within the child. The impact the abuse on the child may be present for the rest of the child’s life, which will affect how the person interacts with others and possibly their own children. Studies have shown that nearly three million children in the U.S experience some form of maltreatment. Abuse can be physical, verbal, …show more content…
Specifically children who have experienced abuse have increased levels of aggression, inattention, hyperactivity, conduct problems, noncompliance, and delinquency (Spinazzola et al., 2014). In addition, effects of abuse have also been linked to low self-esteem, suicidality, depression, anxiety, PTSD, and internalizing symptoms. In other words, abuse has a major impact on how a child behaves in various types of setting such as in school, at home, other peoples homes, and out in public. These behaviors can be difficult for teachers, family members, and other s to handle. I think it is important to be aware if some of these behaviors are present to assess for possible abuse because the other issues related to abuse may not be as noticeable or prevalent. I explored an article that completed a study specifically geared at behavior changes in children who have been abused. For this study the CDS collected data from 14,088 children from a spa of 2004 to 2010. The children were evaluated using measures such as the UCLA Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Reaction Index (PTSD-RI), the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), the Trauma History Profile (THP), and an indicator of severity and clinical evaluation assessment. From the results of the assessments of a span of six years, the results showed that abuse in childhood not only augments, …show more content…
I was never abused as a child but as a young adult I was in an abusive relationship. I can account from first hand experience how much of an impact it has on a persons cognitions, behaviors, affect, and neurological damage that can occur. After someone experiences abuse it changes how your relationships are with other people, how you think and behave. Specifically for me I would find my self doing things that I would have done with my old abusive boyfriend, with my new not abusive boyfriend and that was extremely frustrated. Trying to unlearn behavior patterns is a difficult process. So when peaking in terms of children I cant even imagine how they must feel. Luckily they are much more resilient. I think that by having that abusive experience I could meet the child where they are in a sense. I can help them build back their trust, self-esteem, and change their negative thought patterns. The main issues I see with countertransference for me would be against the perpetrator and the victim. Specifically for the child, it may take me back to that difficult place and may stir up a lot of emotions. In terms of the perpetrator, I know that I may have feelings of anger towards them for how they treated my client. Despite the countertransference that may occur, I do not believe that it will impact therapy in any way. I think that if anything my experience will add to the therapeutic relationship and therapeutic process. In addition, I would

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