Chevon Quality Derived from Goat (Capra Hircus) Fed with Different Levels of Madre de Agua (Tricantera Gigantea)

Topics: Meat, Livestock, Goat Pages: 15 (2298 words) Published: August 19, 2013

CHEVON QUALITY DERIVED FROM GOAT (Capra hircus) FED WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF MADRE DE AGUA (Tricantera gigantea)

EMMANUEL B. CABANAG

A THESIS PROPOSAL TO BE PRESENTED TO THE RESEARCH COMMITTEE OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, WESTERN PHILIPPINES UNIVESITY IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
OF

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS

SY 2011-2012

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study

Small ruminants form an important economic and ecological niche in agricultural

systems throughout the developing countries. Their current contribution is not

commensurate with the potential capacity for higher levels of production. The context for

productivity enhancement and increased socioeconomic contribution relates to large

population size, wide distribution across various agro-ecological zones and production

systems and diversity of breeds.

Goats (Capra hircus) have gone a long way from just a poor man’s cow. These

animals proved to be more than just four-legged mammals that generate milk and meat.

They survive in almost any kind of environment that’s dry and where resources are

available. However, raising goat, expects several problems like malnutrition, lack of

nutrients of goats because of the wrong nutrient content they take. That’s why the

Chevon meat is weakling in Philippines.

Eating healthy has become an important issue for marketing to the general consumer.

Goat meat has an excellent, distinctly sweet flavor somewhat similar to beef and venison. The

meat is lean with very limited fat marbling. It has less fat than chicken or any of the red meats

commonly consumed in the United States.[1] Goats tend to deposit their fat internally before they

deposit it externally and in the slaughtering process, this internal fat is removed along with the

rest of the internal organs. A well conditioned goat will have a thin coating of fat over its muscles

that helps keep the meat moist.

Goat meat is much lower in saturated fats than other commonly consumed meats,

including skinless chicken. It has an excellent ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fats, making it

a very healthy choice of meat. The health conscious food market is very likely to increase in

importance but is fraught with various challenges in the marketplace, such as quality, traceability,

consumer misconceptions, and price.

CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Trichantera gigantea, perhaps the most promising fodder tree from the point of

view of yield, palatability, and source of protein (Gómez and Murgueitio, 1991) contains

18% crude protein in dry matter (leaves) and can produce, annually, from 40 to 60 t/ha of

fresh foliage. Sarria et al. (1992) reported a decrease in the growth rate of pigs when

Trichantera gigantea provided up to 25% of the dietary protein in a sugar cane juice/soya

bean meal feeding system, and it was suggested that performance was related to the lower

nutrient digestibility or an imbalance of the essential amino acids in the foliage. This

result was in contrast to an earlier observation that, as a source of protein for gestating

sows, the use of up to 75% fresh Trichantera gigantea leaves was possible (Mejia, 1991,

as cited by Preston and Murgueitio, 1992).

Recently, Sarria (1994) concluded that there were no significant differences in the

productive parameters of weaned piglets when the sows, during gestation, were fed a

restricted amount of sugar cane juice, either soya bean meal or cooked soya beans, and up

to 30% of daily protein requirements in the form of fresh Trichantera leaves, about one

kilogram per day. Trichantera gigantea was introduced into Vietnam from the coffee

growing region of Colombia where it is used as shade for coffee, as a live...

Cited: Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen, Scotand (e-mail: blk@rri.sari.ac.uk)
(20 June 1997)
Gómez, M. E. and Murgueitio, E. 1991. Efecto de la altura de corte sobre la producción de biomasa del Nacedero (Trichantera gigantea). Livestock Research for Rural development 3(3):14–23.
Sarría, P. 1994. Efecto de nacedero (Trichanthera gigantea) como reemplazo parcial de la soya en derdas en gestacion and lactancia recibiendo una dieta básica de jugo de caña. Livest. Res. Rur. Devel. 6(1):62–73.
Sarría, P., Villavicencio, E. and Orejuela, L.E. 1992. Utilización de follaje de Nacedero
(Trichanthera gigantea) en la alimentación de cerdos de engorde
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