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Chapter Summaries Of Color Blind Racism

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Chapter Summaries Of Color Blind Racism
Summary of Key Points:
This chapter is based on two types of stories which are story line and testimonies. Story lines as the socially shared tales that are fable-like and incorporate a common scheme and wording (124). Testimonies are accounts in which the narrator is a central participant in the story or is close to the characters in the story (124). The book talks about four major story lines of color-blind racism. The first one is “The Past Is the Past,” which mean that people must put the past behind them. It is also a such term call ex affirmative action that do a reverse by letting the racial flame be alive. The respondents feel as if it is necessary to let go of the past and move forward and to also forget about what happened back then. Next is the “I Didn't Own Any Slaves,” this statement is to let others know that the generation now is not responsible for the ills of slavery. These respondents felt as what slavery got to do with today race. And that Blacks does not need to be played for anything. Then another story line is “If Jews,
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Negative interaction with Blacks is incident how blacks handle situation instead of going a different approach they are more aggression and used force. Positive interaction with blacks is episode or relationship with one to identify the good relationship one have with or views toward blacks. The second types of stories is stories of disclosure of knowledge of someone close who is racial. This type of story is one who inform about a close relative being racist. The last type of story is the other personal stories. These stories mostly end up with one saying, “Someone Close to Me or Dated a Minority,” or “I Used to Have Very Good Black Friends” so as reading the chapter one can see how whites tend to interact mostly with their own

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