Chapter Review for Thank You For Arguing by Jay Heinrichs

Powerful Essays
Jiamond Watson Ms. Snyder AP English 8 Sunday 2014

Thank You for Arguing
1. Open Your Eyes The first chapter introduced the reader to the art of rhetoric. He describes how rhetoric works through real life examples. He demonstrates ways that rhetoric persuades us like, argument from strength, and seduction. He tells the reader that the sole purpose of arguing is to persuade the audience. He showed that the chief purpose of arguing is to also achieve consensus, a shared faith in a choice.
2. Set Your Goals This chapter distinguished the difference between a fight and an argument. In an example, he used a study based on married couples. The couples whose marriage succeeded argued, the marriages that didn’t last long, fought. The difference is that in a fight, you want to win. In an argument, you want to achieve a goal. For the persuader to do his job, he needs to set a goal. In order to achieve his goal, he needs to change audience’s mood, mind, and willingness.
3. Control The Tense
This chapter focused on the subject and the tenses. To argue, you need an issue. Blame, value, and choice are usually the main causes for an argument. Knowing the issue is important because your goal will not be met if you argue about the wrong core issue. To figure out the core issue, focus on the tense. Blaming is told in past tense, values are in the present, and choice is determined in the future. Control the issue and control the clock. In the present tense (demonstrative) it ends with people separating or bonding. Past tense (forensic) threatens punishment. And future tense (deliberative) argument promises something in the future. He also introduces the first rule of rhetoric, never debate the undebatable.
4. Soften Them Up
In every argument, you need a tool to use to help you persuade the audience. Argument by character (ethos), argument by

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