Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology (Chapters 9 and 10)

Good Essays
Jonathan Orellana
SSA 101 7400
Professor Townsend
Chapter 9 & 10

Chapter 9

1. How does Lee assess the day-to-day quality of !Kung life when they lived as foragers? How does this view compare with that held by many anthropologists in the early 1960’s?

Lee begins to assess the day-to-day quality of the !Kung by keeping records of their food sources and water sources. He makes table depicting the !Kung’s movements during dry season to wells of fresh water. He documents how many different groups stay at which well. He tables all the available species of crops and food and comes to the conclusion that out of 75 percent of the listed species of food the !Kung are only using a selected few. One of the most utilized food is Mongongo nut that will grow in harsh weather conditions. A !kang was documented saying “why should we plant, when there are so many mongongo nuts in the world”. These charts indicate that the !Kung are not living from hand to month on the verge to starvation as previously believed. If the Bushmen were living on a starvation level then Lee theorizes that one would expect them to exploit every available source of nutrition.

2. According to Lee, !Kung children are not expected to work until after they are married; old people are supported and respected. How does this arrangement differ from behavior in our own society, and what might explain the difference?

In our own society children don’t work until they are 14 or 15, some begin working at a younger age. A few 10 or 11 year olds with entrepreneurial spirits will go to houses offering services to cut lawns for $10 or what have you. It biggest difference between is that young men or boys in the !kung do not work until they are married. The possibility for that could be the boy now has his own family now and must contribute to the hunt in order to provide for his own faction of the family. Elders in my society and in American culture I believe are no respected, they’re forced into nursing homes or

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Culture Conflict Theory

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Thorsten Sellin. Culture conflict and crime. American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 44, No. 1 (Jul., 1938), pp. 97-103.…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    100years ago children went out to work at a very young age. They worked in places such as mines, factories and mills. There is now a legal age limit where children cannot work below the age of. Working class or poor…

    • 4920 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    My maternal grandmother, Kwun, was born in Fujian, China in 1919. Her rural community consisted mainly of farmers, and their society most resembled the clan family pattern where the hoe was the primary mode of production. In comparison to other residents of her town, she was raised in a relatively wealthy household; her parents were shopkeepers for a local tea business and field work was not required of her. However, she was still a productive member of society and contributed by taking care of the younger children in her family. Kwun’s household size varied while she grew up. She was the second oldest child out of four or five children, the exact number of her siblings is unknown since infant mortality was…

    • 1737 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Cultural diversity is a reality and here to stay, it will not vanish overnight. People do things and think differently in diverse parts of the continents. In the same context, bringing up African children in foreign nations is not easy as the children face cultural shock (Nwokeafor, 2008). The parents or guardians must develop strategies that bring out mutual understanding between the children and the host culture. Surveys have indicated that people originating from diverse…

    • 339 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    All throughout our readings, lectures, videos, and textbook we learn the effects of globalization on the different nations we studied. I often felt sad for these nations because we were encouraging them to practice our traditions and therefore their personal identities and culture were lost. Other than to improve healthcare and poverty through medical care and education I could not find positive improvements. In fact it appeared in most cases we were trying to force our beliefs and practices on these third world countries. Furthermore it appeared we weren’t doing this for the good of the group but to increase our own wealth, power, religious converts, prestige, and possessions. In India they eat dogs and worship cows. In America we eat cows and worship dogs. The Native Americans love and revere their elders and Americans put their elders in nursing homes and devalue their wisdom. It seemed to me that what they learned from the Americans was the American greed for material wealth, power, money, and ownership. These people never felt that was necessary to increase their well being. We Americans taught them that. Man;y comments in our text spoke of the fact that these nations weren’t wealthy. That’s a relative term. Wealthy by our standards or wealthy by the traditional native standards? Their wealth came from kinship relations, rituals, religious ceremonies and hunting, fishing, and farming.…

    • 1572 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Critique of Anthropology http://coa.sagepub.com/ `Right There with You ': Coca-Cola, Labor Restructuring and Political Violence in Colombia Lesley Gill Critique of Anthropology 2007 27: 235 DOI: 10.1177/0308275X07080354 The online version of this article can be found at: http://coa.sagepub.com/content/27/3/235 Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com Additional services and information for Critique of Anthropology can be found at: Email Alerts: http://coa.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Subscriptions: http://coa.sagepub.com/subscriptions Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Permissions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Citations: http://coa.sagepub.com/content/27/3/235.refs.html >> Version of Record…

    • 11858 Words
    • 40 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Anthropology (Cultural)

    • 850 Words
    • 4 Pages

    • Don’t stress over this….this is to help you get your thoughts moving and organized…

    • 850 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    To understand the reasoning behind my desire of pursuing a PhD in Socio-Cultural Anthropology, I will begin by stating the intersubjectivities that have been leading me throughout my academic life. Afterwards I would explain the academic-scientific logic behind my current research and future goals, since the both underlie in the passion for social justice that characterizes me, both professionally and personally.…

    • 1163 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Unilineal cultural evolutionism—generally regarded as the first theoretical perspective to take root in the discipline of anthropology…

    • 1943 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Intro to anthropology

    • 3185 Words
    • 13 Pages

    Published in: Burian Alex. Kontiades Xen.,(eds), The Institutional Reforms in the Republic of Moldova in the Context of European Integration, Proceedings, International Conference, Institute of History, State and Law, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Chisinau, Moldova, pp 102-106, MODELING PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: NORMATIVE VERSUS OPERATIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE TRADITION IN EU MEMBER STATES Theodore N. Tsekos Assistant Professor of Public Administration The…

    • 3185 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Anthropology and Culture

    • 2252 Words
    • 10 Pages

    E. Race is a social construct and is therefore a necessary tool for categorizing people of various cultures…

    • 2252 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The history of child labor dates back to the pre-industrial period as Clark-Bennett and Sherer (2004) reveals. During that time, children participated in simple household activities such as bringing up siblings and farming, when their families thought they were of age. From a general standpoint, this kind of work is not harmful. As their study confirms, children aged thirteen years and above were adults and could do work similar to adults. Noteworthy also is that education was of little or no importance during the pre-industrial…

    • 537 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cultural Anthropology

    • 436 Words
    • 2 Pages

    2. Construct a model of cross-cultural misunderstanding, using the information presented by Lee in this article.…

    • 436 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    As a beginning of this film, a myth is told by the Nyinba people of Nepal: a story of fearsome spirits thought to kill children and the weak. Their crime was adulterous passionate love and it was this that had condemned them to live eternally between life and death. In this film, we learn about and explore marriages in tribal societies. We can clearly identify the differences that challenge both side’s ideas and sensibilities about marriage bonds.…

    • 745 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    For the most part in the !Kung society the men do the hunting and the women do the foraging. The women gather roots, berries, fruits, and nuts. Typical foods they might return with are mongongo nuts, baobab fruits, water roots, bitter melon, or !Gwa berries. A women will walk between two and twelve miles two or three times a week to go gathering. Food brought back by women makes up over two-thirds of the nourishment in a !Kung village. Typical game sought in the hunt includes wildebeest, gemsbok, and giraffe; they also kill various reptiles and birds, and collect honey when it is available. A man will walk between 1200 and 2100 miles a year in the pursuit of the fifty-five species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and insects considered edible. However if a hunt is unsuccessful, he may collect some vegetable foods on his way home so as not to come back to the village empty handed.…

    • 2265 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays