Chapter 6

Good Essays
Linda Kerber described the predicaments of the Federalists, a political party whose members feared that popular democracy might spin out of control. Although they both fostered economic development, the Federalists were aware that an urban grassroots would result. The believers of the Federalist Party believed that Jefferson’s approach to politics was naïve. The early stages of industrialization and urban growth were providing the ingredients of a working class; already existing was an unpredictable class of permanently poor who might well be available for mob action. The God or the religious beliefs of the Federalists often appeared to behave like a fourth branch of Government. They believed that religious obligation would reinforce moral obligation and would make popular government orderly and stable. On the other hand the Jeffersonian supporters felt they should break down the barrier of habitual morality (religion), with the interruption of education, habit and superstitions they were confident they would have a more positive vice.
Drew R. McCoy spoke of “The Fears of the Jeffersonian Republicans”. Jefferson and his supporters predicted the challenges for the future of the United States. They were fearful of creating a dependent class; he envisioned huge tracts of land being farmed by righteous residents of the young republic. In keeping their independence from the British they encouraged production “within our families”, but for the finer manufactures, they would continue to rely on importations from abroad. New forms of employment needed to be created in order to keep the moral and political advantages of America up. The largest fears were of an uprising of the working class people and independent revolutions. Ben Franklin recognized that corruption could result from both natural and artificial causes. Jefferson was always faced with the reality of his plan failing constantly reminded by the thought of the decline of the Roman Empire.
I found this Chapter

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Jeffersonian Republicans

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Thomas Jefferson and his Republican followers envisioned a society in vivid contrast to that of the Federalists. They dreamed of a nation of independent farmers living under a central government that exercised a minimum of control over their lives and served merely to protect the individual liberties granted by the Constitution. Jefferson, in his dialog with Presbyterian minister Samuel Miller, demonstrated that the government will only be ruled by the Constitution, and not even God would have a say. (Document B) That vision proved to be a mirage, and Jefferson was to preside over a nation that was growing more industrial and urban, which seemed to need an ever-stronger hand at the presidential “tiller.”…

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    1998 Dbq Essay

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Federalist dominated national politics for the first decade of our nation’s history and it was not until the Revolution of 1800 when the Jefferson and his Republicans took over. In a letter to Gideon Granger, a fellow Republican, Jefferson expresses his opinion that the Federalist indeed do not observe the obvious principles of the Constitution and that the Republicans true “preservation” of the Constitution will lead them to a majority in the legislature, (Document A). This piece of information shows support to the idea that the Republicans were strict constructionists of the Constitution and their looking down of the Federalists who took a broader…

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The origins of the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties can be traced back to the early 1790s. Initially, the Federalists, or broad constructionists, favored the growth of federal power and a strong central government. The Federalists promulgated a loose interpretation of the Constitution, which meant that they believed that the government could do anything by the implied powers of the Constitution. On the contrary, the Democratic-Republicans favored the protection of states’ rights and the strict containment of federal power. The Democratic-Republicans were strict constructionists and they believed only in the enumerated powers of the Constitution. Up until 1800, these descriptions of the two political parties were very accurate. However, the Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe presidencies reveal that these characterizations were accurate only to a certain extent. However, it is important to note that these characterizations were only inaccurate mainly because of the presidencies themselves. During their presidencies, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe were forced to compromise their political views in the face of war, economic pressure, and threats to the Union. Therefore, these labels can only be considered true to a certain extent.…

    • 1343 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Two competing political philosophies have always existed throughout the United States’ relatively short history: one seeking to increase the power of the central government, and one seeking to decrease it. During the 1800s these two conflicting philosophies were acted out by the Federalist and the Democratic Republican parties, respectively. The Federalists, led by Alexander Hamilton, advocated the importance of a strong central government in leading the country forward, while the Democratic Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson, promoted increasing the common man’s role in government. Although both political parties had good intentions for the future of the United States, the Federalist Party was much more effective at uniting the American people, avoiding domestic faction, and keeping the best interests in mind for the future of the United States.…

    • 1132 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    During the Revolutionary- Federalist Era, politics, parties, programs, policies, and people made an enormous difference in how the new nation should be structured and run. During this era, two men in particular championed politics and their respective parties. These two men were Alexander Hamilton, a Federalist, and Thomas Jefferson, a Democratic-Republican. Both Hamilton and Jefferson were successful college educated intellectuals and politicians who made significant contributions to the development of the United States policies and programs. However Hamilton, despite never being elected President, had more influence over the development of the United States’ policies and programs during the Revolutionary-Federalist Era. Historically Hamilton and Jefferson are known for agreeing to disagree over just about every policy being discussed during the establishment of government structure, and decorum. And it is Hamilton’s policies on economics, government structure, and constitution interpretation, which took precedent over Jefferson’s.…

    • 875 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Harry L. Watson’s book, “Liberty and Power, The Politics of Jacksonian America”, takes an analytical look at America and her politics during the Age of Jackson. Watson uses the economy and the ideological mindset of the people, to support a powerful argument about the beginning of American political parties and their importance in defining the political direction of the country. Watson argues that economic inequalities caused by the “Market Revolution” and a threat to American liberty caused Americans to organize politically in support of a President that would put the interest of the majority first. The results would be pivotal in American politics and shape how elections were conducted to this day.…

    • 971 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    During the European enlightenment of the eighteenth century, educated men of the aristocracy began to shun the traditional Puritan mindset. Instead they chose to reform society and advance knowledge through scientific discovery and natural laws of the physical universe instead of the spiritual universe. Among these educated men was Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson had a rationalist mindset. He believed that men could control their own destiny, and natural law shaped society, as opposed to the spiritual view of the puritans. This view did not bode well with evangelical Protestants. In 1790 the federal party led by Washington and Adams openly opposed his views, stating that Jefferson was an “infidel, an apologist for slavery, and a lover of French revolutionary excess.” (Couvares 76-3) and in fact history had already become politicized.…

    • 609 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Founding Brothers Review

    • 1450 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In the book Founding Brothers by Joseph Ellis, the author relates the stories of six crucial historic events that manage to capture the flavor and fervor of the revolutionary generation and its great leaders. While each chapter or story can be read separately and completely understood, they do relate to a broader common theme. One of Ellis' main purposes in writing the book was to illustrate the early stages and tribulations of the American government and its system through his use of well blended stories. The idea that a republican government of this nature was completely unprecedented is emphasized through out the book. Ellis discusses the unique problems that the revolutionary generation experienced as a result of governing under the new concept of a democracy. These problems included- the interpretation of constitutional powers, the regulation of governmental power through checks and balances, the first presidential elections, the surprising emergence of political parties, states rights vs. federal authority, and the issue of slavery in a otherwise free society. Ellis dives even deeper into the subject by exposing the readers to true insight of the major players of the founding generation. The book attempts to capture the ideals of the early revolutionary generation leaders and their conflicting political viewpoints. The personalities of Hamilton, Burr, Adams, Washington, Madison, and Jefferson are presented in great detail. Ellis exposes the reality of the internal and partisan conflict endured by each of these figures in relation to each other. Ellis emphasizes that despite these difficult hurdles, the young American nation survived its early stages because of its great collection of charismatic leaders and their ability to settle their disputes through compromise.…

    • 1450 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Chapter Six

    • 1050 Words
    • 3 Pages

    and allows the single owner to reap all of the profits; sole proprietorships have major limitations, can only have one owner, risk associated with unlimited liability, and its difficult to manage a business on your own…

    • 1050 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Chapter 2

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages

    13. Which of the following statements does not apply to a weak approach to sustainable tourism?…

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Chapter 6

    • 6248 Words
    • 32 Pages

    Which of the following is not an example of one of the main instruments in trade policy used by…

    • 6248 Words
    • 32 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Thesis: The political and economic views of Hamiltonian Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans differed in terms of centralized or state governments, acts passed by congress, American liberty, and industries. Later on when the Republican party dominated the government after the War of 1812, their original ideals started to blend in with Federalists’ and the lines blurred.…

    • 287 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Chapter 5

    • 766 Words
    • 4 Pages

    John Moore AP world history Chapter 5:The classical period; directions,diversions and decline by 500 C.E. Thesis: Picture:…

    • 766 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Chapter 5

    • 414 Words
    • 2 Pages

    C- SCOTUS upheld the promotion under the voluntary affirmative action plan, the plan was reasonable.…

    • 414 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Few men can compare to Thomas Jefferson in terms of articulation and benevolent philosophical views. He was a brilliant man whose verbalization formulated the United States’ Declaration of Independence from mother England. Jefferson was a man who believed in the preservation of individual liberties and equality, principles that are necessary for a nation to flourish. He was the country’s first secretary of state, and eventually he would become the third president of the United States. Jefferson helped establish the country that exists today, and his contributions remain observable 186 years after his passing. His likeness is now etched upon a mountainside in South Dakota, as if he is still watching down on the country his hands helped mold. He consistently opposed formation of strong central authority for fear it would dawn tyranny. Instead, he much preferred small government intervention. Jefferson is known as a wise and influential founding father by historians and scholars alike. Upon reviewing Jefferson’s credentials and beliefs, one would conclude him to be a great American hero. Yet, deeper investigation proves that Jefferson’s ideologies often strayed far from his actions. Although this is true, I believe Jefferson’s actions, though detested today, were essential for his time and should not be scrutinized by our modern-day values.…

    • 1215 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays