Changes In Colonial Englishwomen

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Conditions changed for Englishwomen over the colonial period in America. In early colonial period men, woman and children traveled to America to settle. This was unusual because usually young men are going first to the frontier then woman and families follow afterward. The families coming to America together created a tight knit community where they had public elementary schools for the children to learn to read. More Englishmen than Englishwomen who came to Massachusetts could read. Some woman in Jamestown worked at the tobacco farms and in other colonies may have done other sorts of labor. At the time women’s labor belonged to their husband. In the early 1600s many Puritans, like John Winthrop, who came to America from England followed the

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