Change Model Paper

Powerful Essays
Change Management Model Paper
Rainier Legaspi-Burkley
Grand Canyon University: LDR-615
November 19, 2014

Change Management Models
In order to evaluate organizational change, it is crucial to understand the models of organizational change. Change models can reveal the compelling forces of change, what will happen, and how it will happen. It is sometimes difficult to find a model that best fits the nature of the organization. However, the use of any change model is beneficial because it offers a guideline to follow and predict the presumed results of the change initiative (Mento, Jones, & Dirndorfer, 2002). While there are many change management models, a few of the well-known models are: Lewin’s change management model and Bridge’s transition model. This paper will discuss Lewin’s change management model and Bridge’s transition model. Within each change model, it will address the role of the leader in the change initiative, overcoming resistance to change, and communication process of both models. It would also assess the strengths and weaknesses of each model.
Lewin’s Change Management Model According to Kurt Lewin, successful change in any organization should follow three steps: unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. Unfreezing involves overcoming the pressures of individual resistance and group conformity. Changing or movement happens when the change is initiated and the organization is getting ready to move into a transition stage. Refreezing occurs after change has been accepted and the organization can operate under the new changes (Robbins & Judge, 2009). Lewin’s model identified that most people prefer to function within their comfort zones. Most people like the comfort, sense of identity, and control from the environment that they are familiar with. In this model, the leader’s role is to remove the resistance of change through motivation. One way to deal with the resistance is to use positive incentives to encourage employees to accept the



References: Brisson-Banks, C. V. (2010). Managing change and transitions: a comparison of different models and their commonalities. Library Management, 31, 241-252. doi:10.1108/01435121011046317 Mind Tools. (n.d.). Bridges ' transition model - Change management tools from MindTools.com. Retrieved from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/bridges-transition-model.htm Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. (2009). Organizational behavior (13th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Washington University. (n.d.). Three phases of transition - William Bridges. Retrieved from http://www.washington.edu/research/rapid/resources/changeModels/mc_three_phases.pdf Zigarmi, P., & Witt, D. (2007). Leading Change. Retrieved from http://www.kenblanchard.com/img/pub/leading_change_handout.pdf

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