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Categories of Different Types of School

By CBuckland1 Nov 15, 2012 2045 Words
Level 2 Award in Support Work in Schools

Categories of Different Types of School

I will identify and describe the characteristics of six different types of state and independent school below and outline the way in which these schools are managed, the ages of the children they deal with and the curriculum that they are required to follow.

Community schools

In a community school:-

the local education authority owns the land and buildings, but the governing body is

responsible for running the school

the local education authority employs the staff

the local education authority funds the school
the local education authority provides support services, for example, psychological services and special educational needs services the pupils have to follow the national curriculum

the admissions policy is usually determined and administered by the local education

authority

Community schools look to develop strong links with the local community. They can do this in a number of ways, including providing use of their facilities, or providing services like childcare and adult learning classes.

An example of a community school is Woodlands Community Primary School situated in Cwmbran. The ages of the children attending range from 4-11 years. The curriculum followed, is made up of block of years, known as key stages: Year 1 and Year 2 are known as Key Stage 1

Year 3 to 6 are known as Key Stage 2

Compulsory National Curriculum subjects are the same for Key Stages 1 and 2: English
Maths
Science
Design and Technology
Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
History
Geography
Art and Design
Music
Physical Educational

1

2 Voluntary controlled schools

A voluntary controlled school can also be called a religious or faith school.

In a voluntary controlled school:

the land and buildings are owned by a charity, often a religious organisation such as a church the charity appoints some of the members of the governing body, but the local education authority is responsible for running the school

the school is funded by the local education authority

the local education authority employs the staff

the local education authority provides support services

the pupils have to follow the national curriculum

the admissions policy is usually determined and administered by the local education authority

An example of a voluntary controlled school is Eyton Church in Wales Voluntary Controlled Primary school situated in Wrexham. The ages of the children attending range from 4-11 years. The curriculum that they are required to follow includes:-

Language, Literacy and Communication,

Personal and Social Development

Mathematical Development

Knowledge and Understanding of the World

Creative Developments

Physical Development

They also offer a wide range of extra-curricular activities that include fencing, Dragon Sports football, rugby and netball, cycling proficiency, gardening, computer club and gymnastics.

The governing body of the school comprises of eleven individuals. Governors help set the school's

strategic direction effectively each year and are actively involved with the whole school evaluation.

The governing body will discuss issues such as:-

Election of Chair and Vice Chair

Election of new governors

Finance – Budget

Additional grants to school budget

Traffic Management on site

Regular Head Teacher's Reports

Staffing Appointments

Health and Safety Audit

School Action Plan

Target Setting

Building and Maintenance Projects

School Funds

PTA

School Based Review

Appointment of Governors with Specific Responsibilities

Annual Report to Parents

Governor Training

School Council

Child Protection Issues

Capital Spending Plan

The school is required to set targets for the Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 assessments. These are discussed with County Education Officers and approved by the Governing Body. These targets are then published and reported on through the Governors Reports to Parents.

Voluntary Aided Schools

Voluntary aided schools are usually called religious schools or faith schools. In a voluntary aided school:-

the land and buildings are normally owned by a charity, often a religious organisation such as a church, but the governing body is responsible for running the school

the school is funded partly by the local education authority (Education and Library Board in Northern Ireland), partly by the governing body and partly by the charity

the governing body employs the staff

the local education authority provides support services

the pupils have to follow the national curriculum

the admissions policy is determined and administered by the governors in consultation with the local education authority and other relevant schools in the area.

An example of a voluntary aided school is The Priory Church of England School situated in Dorking. The ages of the children attending range from 11-19 years. The curriculum that they are required to follow are Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 and the subjects are as follows:-

English

Maths

Science

Design and Technology

Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

History

Geography

Modern foreign languages

Art and design

Music

Citizenship

Physical Education

In addition, pupils have to take careers education and work-related learning. Also, religious education, SRE, and at least one subject from each of the four 'entitlement' areas.

The entitlement areas are:

Arts Subjects
Design and Technology
Humanities
Modern foreign languages
Foundation Schools
In foundation schools:-
the land and buildings are owned by a governing body, who are also responsible for running the school the local education authority funds the school
the governing body employs the staff
the governing body buys in and administers most of the support services the pupils have to follow the national curriculum
the admissions policy is determined and administered by the governing body, in consultation with the local education authority and other relevant schools in the area.

An example of a foundation school is Chingford Foundation School situated in London. The ages of the children attending are 11-18 years. The curriculum that they are required to follow are Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 and the subjects are as follows:- English

Maths

Science

Design and Technology

Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

History

Geography

Modern foreign languages

Art and design

Music

Citizenship

Physical Education

In addition, pupils have to take careers education and work-related learning. Also, religious education, SRE, and at least one subject from each of the four 'entitlement' areas.

The entitlement areas are:

Arts Subjects
Design and Technology
Humanities
Modern foreign languages
Chingford has the following categories of school governor:
Parent governors – selected by election (or appointment if insufficient people stand for election) and drawn from parents and carers of children at the school head teacher – ex officio
staff governors – selected by election from teaching and support staff paid to work at the school community governors – appointed by the governing body to represent community interests LEA governors - appointed by the LEA

partnership governors – appointed by the governing body
sponsor governors – discretionary category appointed by the governing body from individuals who have made significant (financial) contributions to the school associate members (not governors) – appointed by the governing body to attend committee meetings and/or full governing body meetings due to their particular skills or experiences.

The governing body has a range of duties and powers and a general responsibility for the conduct of the school with a view to promoting high standards of educational achievement including setting targets for pupil achievement, managing the school's finances, making sure the curriculum is balanced and broadly used, appointing staff and reviewing staff performance and pay and many more. At those foundation schools which were former GM schools (Chingford falls into this category), the land and buildings will generally be owned by the governing body. The governing body of a foundation school requires the Secretary of State's consent to dispose of any land or buildings originally provided at public expense. Safeguards also exist to protect the public interest in any land being disposed of by the trustees of a school where that land was originally provided or enhanced with aid of public monies. LEA's are responsible for funding all capital works at community, foundation and voluntary controlled schools.

Independent Schools
In an independent school:-
the governing body is responsible for the day-to-day running of the school the school is funded by fees paid by parents and, sometimes, charitable trust funds the headteacher with the backing of the governing body employs the staff the headteacher or the governing body may buy in and administer support services the pupils do not have to follow the national curriculum

the admissions policy is determined and administered by the headteacher and the governing body.

An example of an independent school is The Cathedral School situated in Cardiff. The ages of the children attending range from 3-16 years. Infants (ages 4-7) cover the curriculum in line with the National Curriculum. However, they are not bound by this and are able to broaden the range of subjects. A second language is introduced in Year 1. Specialist teachers deliver Drama, Music and PE lessons. Juniors (ages 7-11) cover aspects of the National Curriculum, but they believe that there is a need to provide a more broad, balanced, relevant and differentiated curriculum. Government standards require that pupils at the end of the primary phase of education reach a certain level of attainment. Seniors (ages 11-16) still primarily cover the National Curriculum. Year 7 and 8 study: english

mathematics
science
information technology
history
geography
religious studies
spanish
latin
music
creative arts
PHME (Personal Health and Moral Education)
physical educational
games
Year 9 pupils continue to follow the same curriculum. Year 10 and 11 will study their chosen GCSE option subjects in addition to the core curriculum subjects. Free Schools

Free schools are state-funded schools for children of all abilities, which are set up due to parental demand for more choice in local education. They are non-profit making and independent. Free schools are not controlled by the local authority. Free schools are similar to academies, but will usually ne new schools. Academies are usually the result of a change to an existing state school. Because free schools are not controlled by the local authority, it means they: can set their own pay and conditions for staff

do not have to follow the National Curriculum
have control over their own budget
can change the length of school terms and the school day

Free schools will be funded in a similar way to other state-funded schools, and groups running Free Schools cannot make a profit. Free schools will have the same Ofsted inspections as all state schools and will be expected to maintain the same high standards. The pupil admission arrangements of any Free School must be 'fair and transparent'. This means that Free Schools should be open to pupils of all abilities from the area. They won't be able to select pupils on the basis of their marks or academic ability. Free schools will have to take part in their local area's coordinated admissions process. This means that parents will apply for places for their child in the same way as for any other local school.

A Free School could be set up by any suitable proposer, where there is evidence of demand for one from parents. This evidence could be a petition or declaration from interested parents, along with a clear and well thought out business case.

Free School proposers could include one or more of the following groups: teachers
charities
academy sponsors
universities
independent schools
community and faith groups
parents
businesses (on a not for profit basis)

Proposers have to comply with strict suitability and vetting tests before they can set up a Free School. All proposals will be checked by the Secretary of State for Education, who will consider each proposal on its merits. Any proposers who advocate violence, intolerance, hatred or whose ideology runs counter to the UK's democratic values will have their application rejected.

An example of a free school is Bristol Free School situated in Bristol. The ages of the children attending is 11-19 years. The curriculum followed are Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 and the subjects are as follows:- English

Maths

Science

Design and Technology

Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

History

Geography

Modern foreign languages

Art and design

Music

Citizenship

Physical Education

In addition, pupils have to take careers education and work-related learning. Also, religious education, SRE, and at least one subject from each of the four 'entitlement' areas.

The entitlement areas are:

Arts Subjects
Design and Technology
Humanities
Modern foreign languages

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