Casualization

Topics: Employment, Labour market flexibility, Labour relations Pages: 30 (8616 words) Published: February 13, 2013
CASUALIZATION AND LABOUR UTILIZATION IN NIGERIA.

BY

RASAK BAMIDELE

FOUNTAIN UNIVERSITY OSOGBO, OSUN STATE,
P.M.B. 4491, OSOGBO, OSUN STATE, NIGERIA.
MOBIL PHONE: 08034955615
delerasak@yahoo.co.uk

CASUALIZATION AND LABOUR UTILIZATION IN NIGERIA.
Rasak Bamidele
Department of Sociology and psychology, Fountain University Osogbo, Osun State.

Casualization in the Nigerian labour market is a subject of great concern. Increase casual employees are filling positions that are permanent in nature; in line with employee vulnerability in Nigeria is the high level of unemployment and accompanying poverty. The world economic meltdown has bred a dangerous work environment where many desperate job seekers in the labour force are willing to take any job for survival purposes rather than dignity. Labour exploitation is pervasive in many organizations in Nigeria. It manifests itself in one form or the other including poor salary, wages and salary arrears system, training, promotion, motivation, sense of belonging, job satisfaction and dehumanization of work and workers. Casualization is the other name for a temporary employment, which is manifest in industries, whether in transnational, multinational, public or private and in the informal sector.

Definitions of casual

employment are often a site of confusion and controversy, marked by tensions between vernacular, regulatory and contractual meanings. Therefore, this paper is to examine casualization and labour utilization in Nigeria. The paper was guided by the neo -liberal theory and the social action theory. The choice of these theories is informed by the fact that no one single theory can explain in totality the relationship between casualization and labour utilization in Nigeria.

Key words: Dehumanization, Labour Exploitation, Job Satisfaction, Temporary Employment, Privatization and Commercialization.

INTRODUCTION
Casualization in the Nigerian labour market is a subject of great concern. Increase casual employees are filling positions that are permanent in nature; in line with employee vulnerability in Nigeria is the high level of unemployment and accompanying

poverty (Anugwon, 2007). The world economic meltdown has bred a dangerous work environment where many desperate job seekers in the labour force are willing to take any job for survival purposes rather than dignity.

Labour exploitation is pervasive in many organizations in Nigeria (Kazeem, 2004). It manifests itself in one form or the other including poor salary, wages and salary arrears system, training, promotion, motivation, sense of belonging, job satisfaction and dehumanization of work and workers. Casualization is the other name for a temporary employment, which is manifest in industries, whether in transnational, multinational, public or private and in the informal sector. As Campbell, (2004) aptly notes, definitions of casual employment are often a site of confusion and controversy, marked by tensions between vernacular, regulatory and contractual meanings.

Casualization can be define as work occupations in which the demand for employment is highly variable such as port work, farm migratory work and other jobs of unskilled intermittent nature. Also, Casualization is a form of involuntary servitude for a period of time.

Casualization is making work less secure: the changing of working practices so that workers are employed on a freelance and occasional basis instead of being offered full time contracts.

As more technology is introduced into the work place, the unskilled workers become more disadvantaged (Campbell and Brosnan 1999). However, this technology impact

cannot totally or adequately explain the existence of this situation, especially in developing countries where the level of technological development and adoption is low relative to the developed world. Apart from this, investigation into Nigerian construction firms indicates that the so-called skilled workers...

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