Case Study: The National Spying Agency

Powerful Essays
The National Spying Agency:
Is It Worth Risk?
We are constantly walking past strangers, people we will only see for a brief second. But what if one of these strangers had access to everything that went on in your online life? What if they had access to your landline, texts, mobile calls, e-mails, chats, and even your social media websites? What if it was all legal? This is exactly what the NSA in the United States is doing to their citizens. The US government is allowing this organization to read all of your private information online without a warrant. The NSA has tossed aside every economic, moral, and political issue and have come to a conclusion that the NSA will help stop illegal activity and terrorist threats throughout the US. However,
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According to Edward Snowden instead of combating terrorism, the NSA activity led to “tremendous intelligence failures” that made the Boston Marathon Attack possible. He stated that instead of monitoring suspects the NSA is monitoring everybody’s communications. “That lack of focus has caused us to miss leads that we should’ve had. Tamerlan Tsrnaev, one of the Boston bombers, the Russians had warned us about him…And if we hadn’t spent so much on mass surveillance, if we had followed the traditional models, we might’ve caught him.” Evidently, the NSA declined to comment on the …show more content…
The Patriot Act, Section 215 (USA Patriot Act), allows the NSA to search “any tangible things.” (ACLU) However this is a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment, First Amendment and the Fifth Amendment. In the Fourth Amendment it states, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue.”( U.S. Constitution) This amendment was created to protect US Citizens from having their personal space violated without a warrant. However, the US is clearly violating it by letting the Patriot Act, Section 215 pass. The Act was passed shortly after the 9/11 attack and that was clearly the peak of terrorist attacks and drastic measures had been taken. The passage of this act was reasonable in light of the events of 9/11, but after 14 years since this attack there have been no terrorist attack as horrible as 9/11 and it is clear that the Patriot Act is no longer

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