Case Study on Temple Grandin

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Case Study on Temple Grandin
The movie Temple Grandin is a story of a woman different then most others. She sees the world in away most people cannot and do not understand. The movie shows her struggles and triumphs in childhood, her teenage years, and adult hood. I chose this movie for a couple of reasons first being that I understood this movie is to be about a real persona not just a charter.
Second when watching the previews of the movies on the list this one struck a chord with my heart her mother’s statement “different not less” really hit home.
Temple had many behaviors that would be considered abnormal. On the way to her aunt’s ranch, she talks and laughs not stop about a show she watched even though her aunt has not seen the show and does not understand. Temple does not like to be touched she actually pulls back when people try to touch her. Temple did not talk until the age of four she would stare at things like the chandelier or wallpaper lost in her own thoughts uninterested in what is going on around her. Temple becomes extremely upset when a paper with her name on it falls off her bedroom door. She then finds relief by crawling in to apart of the cattle equipment that squeezes her. The first time Temple has to walk through automatic sliding doors she panics. Temple does not show emotion at the lost of a horse she spent time with or her high school science teacher who mentored her.
As Temple rides with her aunt she goes on and on about her favorite show The Man from U.N.C.L.E. although her aunt has not seen it and does not know what she is talking about she continues to go on. This is seen as abnormal because normally if we are talking to someone and they are not interested or do not understand we change the subject because we want the people we are talking to, to interact with us to communicate what they think and feel about the subject. Temple really does not seem interested in what her aunt thinks.
Temple’s dislike of touch is abnormal most



References: Lang, R., O 'Reilly, M., Olive, H., Rispoli, M., Lydon, H., Streusand, W.,...Giesbers, S. (2010). Sensory integration thearpy for autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 6, 1004-1018. Monger, C. (2010). Temple Grandin [Motion Picture]. Burbank, CA: HBO FILMS.

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