Case Study: Hidden Curriculum as It Concerns Science Education

Powerful Essays
Hidden Curriculum as It Concerns Science Education, the field of TESOL, Post-Colonialism, and Standardized Tests
Anne Garcia
Hongji Gui
Jing Song
Hanqing Zhang
Jinghong Zhang

Purdue University
EDCI 580 – Dr. Jake Burdick

Hidden Curriculum as It Concerns Science Education, the field of TESOL, Post-Colonialism, and Standardized Tests
Introduction
Hidden Curriculum is ever present in today’s schools, no matter the country. From Asia to North America, there are cases of Hidden Curriculum everywhere. True to its name, Hidden Curriculum is hard to detect, hard to evaluate, and even harder to change. Starting with the idea of real life experience in science education, and then delving into racism in the TESOL field itself, and ending with how standardized tests affect students, we will discuss how all of these affect curriculum. Huebner (1975) explains curricular language and meaning and then illustrates five Value Systems that reflects the current ideology in curriculum. The five frameworks as described by Huebner (1975) are: Technical, Political, Scientific, Esthetic, and Ethical. All five systems have merit and have usefulness at the right time. Fully encompassing the five frameworks would probably be the ideal way to express curriculum in the classroom. The classroom can be described as a political arena. Someone has to have the power; so who should have it and when? The Technical Value System “has a means-ends rationality that approaches an economic model” (p. 223). When this idea is used, students are viewed as the end product and the school would be the factory. The idea makes us think of cars or a radio being produced along a conveyor belt. Factory workers (teachers) insert screws, nuts, bolts, and other things to hold the pieces (knowledge) together of the final product (student). If the bolt the teacher is given doesn’t fit into the hole it’s supposed to fit into, the teacher doesn’t know what to do. The teacher doesn’t know what to



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