The Duties of a Division Manager

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Q1) Can a division manager develop verifiable goals, or objectives, when the president has not assigned them to him or her? How? What kind of information or help do you believe is important for the division manager to have from headquarters?

Ans : Yes, I think a division manager can develop verifiable goals, or objective, when they have not been assigned to him or her by the president.
As Division Manager oversees a section of a company. He or she sets the direction for the division and ultimately is responsible for division’s success. His responsibility is to develop goals and objectives for his or her organization. They establish policies and procedure and time to time monitor the roles of there employees. As mentioned he had practiced Management by Objective (MBO) which gives an objective to employees and help them to develop a structure how to work and achieve the goal. Thus with all these responsibilities he is responsible to monitor the verifiable goals as he is responsible for development of a company. He or she should not wait for president to assign him all the duties. He should take all the initiatives accordingly required.
Information required for the division manager from the headquarters are:
1) The corporate goals should be clear to division manager so that he can take all the initiatives according to goals has been already set by management.
2) The top managers should give contribution to the MBO activity not only verbally but physically.
3) All the policies and day to day changes should be clear to the division manager.
Objective should be independent and MBO should be flexible enough to adapt unforeseen changes. It should be understood by management.

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