Case Analysis

Good Essays
I. Title
Managing “Daddy Stress” at Baxter Healthcare

II. Background
Daddy stress means is a man who works long hours in an unrelenting job-he is expected to spend–and maybe really wants to spend–more time with his kids, engage in more family activities and take care of household chores.

III. Main Problem
Problem how to manage the stress of balancing work and family

IV. Answer the Question 1. How do the pressure of the family/work balance differ for men and women?

Work/life issues have long been portrayed as a women’s issue. And the fact is, even while holding down a job, mom is spending more time than dad wiping noses, cleaning house and cooking.

But in trying to solve this problem, men are at a distinct disadvantage in the workplace. Why? Corporations expect and tolerate women who publicly push for balance in their lives and work, says Charles Rodgers, chairman of WFD, a Boston-based consulting firm specializing in work/life issues. “Men who do it, however, are looked upon as not being very committed or serious about their jobs.”Whether you call it guilt or a self-imposed sense of responsibility, men usually suffer more when home cuts into work. “Men still tend to define themselves more than females in terms of success at work,” says Geoffrey Greif of the University of Maryland’s School of Social Work. “It’s hard to let go of the idea that success is defined as success at work versus doing a good job as a father.”

To their wives who want to know why they aren’t home for dinner, the career-loving men will say: It’s not as if I’m on the golf course. I was at the office until 11 p.m. working for our family. And the wives can say: But aren’t you doing what you want to do?

In this confusing environment some men are starting to rethink their priorities. Sometimes it’s because they want to be closer to their kids than their distant 1950s dads were to them. Or sometimes they change unwillingly, pushed by their wives to spend more

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