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Caribbean Vs North American Culture Essay

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Caribbean Vs North American Culture Essay
Some plantation owners were absentees who saw the use of slaves simply as a way to make a huge profit.
Slave ships were tightly packed and overcrowded from the huge groups of people being brought overseas. Conditions were often insufferable, with the masses being shoved together in spaces that were too small to hold them.
Some populations, such as the ones in North America, had self-reproducing slave populations and thus did not need to import as many slaves. Others, such as in the Caribbean, had to continually import new slaves as the death rate always exceeded the birth rate.
Culture:
There was not a sense of unity throughout Africa, therefore various African groups captured their enemies and sold them into slavery.
Slaves formed bands with drums and tambourines, in an attempt to retain their cultural traditions,
…show more content…
Differences Between the Caribbean and North America:
North American slave populations had more of a balance between the sexes, but also were kept more segregated from the white populations, as compared to the Caribbean where races were more likely to interact.
This was a result of the North American stigma surrounding “Negroes” and anyone with African ancestry, whereas in the Caribbean, white men often married black women.
Freedom:
In the North, some free slaves were able to reach prominent positions; for example, in New England, blacks were able to vote for their own governors
As opposed to the Latin Americans, North Americans were more severe in terms of limiting the freedoms of Africans.
Work Done by Slaves:
In Africa, many slaves worked as fieldworkers, soldiers, domestic workers, high-level bureaucrats, and on sugar plantations.
In Europe, many were servants, coachmen, cooks and maids. Rather than doing physical work, the slaves did more domestic

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