Call Of The Wild: Movie Analysis

Good Essays
David Fallon’s film, Call of the Wild, is movie surrounding the adventures of a young man and his dog. I watched the film on my computer on July 1st, 2015. The movie begins with a kidnapped dog, named Buck, being auctioned off. Buck immediately steals the attention of young Miles, the other protagonist in the movie. Buck initially works as a sled dog for a Yukon mail carrier. On his first job, Buck faces severe weather, wolf attacks, and a fight with Spitz, the team’s lead dog. The harsh conditions kill every dog except for Buck and leaves the mail carrier in a near-death condition. Buck saves the mail carrier, but is sold again to two travelers, Hal and Mercedes. Miles is hired as a travel guide for the duo. Hal mistreats the dogs, refuses to listen to Miles, and eventually causes his own death. Mercedes and Miles are able to survive the journey with Buck’s aid.
The director wanted his audience to learn that dogs are social beings who will act according to the specific relationships they have with each individual. Dogs will treat each person depending on the emotional attachment and social ties they have
…show more content…
In the beginning, I was maddened by the fact that dogs were kidnapped and auctioned off as if they were material possessions. As the film progressed, I found myself increasingly disgusted with how certain characters, like Hal, overworked their sled dogs and forced them to labor in harsh conditions. Furthermore, I was outraged when Hal attempted to starve the dogs when there were food limitations on the journey. The film might have affected me more than general audience because I have an extremely strong connection with my dog. I can imagine how upset I would be if my dog was one of the sled dogs being forced to work long hours under Hal’s whip. Overall, I am outraged with the way that labor dogs were treated by certain characters in Call of the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Call Of The Wild Analysis

    • 690 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Jack London once said, “The proper function of man is to live, not to exist.” This relates to a major theme in The Call of the Wild, one of Jack’s most popular books, it displays that life is a quest to find one’s identity/destiny, which Buck shows throughout the whole story. Buck takes his taking and turns it around to find who he truly was meant to be. In the beginning, Buck has to learn to adapt to the different and changing environments and stay alive to complete his quest. First, Buck has…

    • 690 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Everybody has had their good and bad times, and usually with their bad times they have to persevere. In The Call of the Wild, Buck was torn from his loving, peaceful life and forced into hard labor, hatred, and regret as he got to know how the wild works. On the other hand, my dad had to persevere when his sister and niece died and he had to learn how to get through that hard time in his life just like Buck had to do. Growing up can have its challenges that require much adaptation and perseverance…

    • 886 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Call Of The Wild Analysis

    • 450 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Call of the Wild, by Jack London, begins in 1897, at the start of the Klondike gold rush. The discovery of gold in the Klondike region motivated thousands of men to head for the far north, all of them in need of dogs to pull sleds across the frigid arctic trails. Buck is an incredibly large dog, half Shepherd and half St. Bernard, who has enjoyed a leisurely life on a California ranch. He is stolen and shipped to the Yukon by his family gardener, Manuel. Buck learns to survive in this harsh environment…

    • 450 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Call of the wild

    • 2057 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Name: Instructor: Course: Date: A Problem of Nature in The Call of the Wild by Gary Snyder The poem Call of the Wild by Gary Snyder represents an ecological view on relationship between nature and Western civilization, as well as on peace and war. The image of the West in this poem is characterized by repression, ignorance, and violence. It ruins both wild nature with its forests and animals, and civilized human 'nature'. Thus, the term nature itself appears to be problematic. I argue that Snyder…

    • 2057 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Call of the Wild

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This excerpt is taken from a novel „The Call of The Wild” by Jack London, published in 1903. In the given passage Buck, the main character of the story, experiences the visions about a sauvage 'hairy man' and starts to hear the call of the wild. His longing for wilderness becomes irresistible, which he finds confusing and at the same time fascinating. Buck manifests his will to understand the origins of the call in orderto establish his real identity. In this commentory I will focus on the question…

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Call of the Wild

    • 578 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Zach Maes English 2 8-30-2011 Call of the Wild 1. Some readers see the hardships and suffering of the dogs in the sled team as symbolic of workers in a Capitalistic system. Identify and explain these similarities. “He had killed man, the noblest game of all, and he had killed in the face of the law, of club and fang” (ch. 7) Capitalism is an economic system in which the workers only…

    • 578 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Call of the Wild

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Call of the Wild In the novel The Call of the Wild, by Jack London, a pampered dog named Buck lives a lovely life in the Santa Clara Valley. When one of the garden workers brings Buck to a train station and sells him, his whole life changes. Buck adapts to his new ways and now is tougher and more aggressive. He isn’t the same dog anymore. The “call of the wild” affects Buck’s behavior and leads him to his true destiny. He has a natural call to live in the wild.…

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Call of the Wild

    • 1061 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Call of the Wild: Life lessons that are learned and thought Introduction As a student in Introduction to Literature I have had the opportunity to engage in reading and writing from the books listed: The Call of the Wild, Harry Potter and the sorcerer's, and I know why the cage bird sings. These books have taught me that a message could be delivered in many perspectives. I have learned that a book is more than a story being told. It is up to the reader imagination to take then to that magical…

    • 1061 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Call of the Wild

    • 911 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Artrail Johnson Professor Meyer English 102 4/4/2013 Call of the Wild: The Ideal Master In Jack London’s famous novel, Call of the Wild, he gives detail explanation of Buck’s life at two different homes. This helps us determine the ideal master for Buck. At his first home Buck did not have any dog responsibilities. Changing homes was the best thing that happened to Buck because he learns to be independent. Judge Miller and John Thornton are both masters of Buck who affected his experience…

    • 911 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Call of the Wild

    • 552 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Call of the Natural World Mangled throats, empty eye sockets, gushing blood - Jack London's gritty, gruesome story of survival transports the reader to the uncharted Klondike of 1897. The Call of the Wild is an adventure tale of a dog named Buck who was kidnapped from his pampered life in California, taken up north, and sold in the black market. He was trained to become a sled dog and served a number of different masters, some merciful, others cruel. He learned how to live in the…

    • 552 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays