Bystander Effect Research Paper

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The bystander effect, bystander effect is a social psychological that refers to cases where people do not offer help to someone who needs help in front of other people. Usually when a person sees someone in danger or someone that needs help, they try and avoid or stay away from the situation so they don’t get in the middle or get hurt. The more bystanders there are most likely the victim will be severely hurt or even killed (Wikipedia Contributors).
One late night, Catherine Genovese 28-years old was coming home from her job from her late night shift. As she was arriving home a man named Winston Mousley attacked her with a knife. She was stabbed, she, yelled but no one seemed to want to help her or call the police. The people said they did
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People do not realize someone is in need of help or in danger until it is too late. The person might be severely hurt or injured. When faced with an emergency situation, knowing what to do greatly increase the likelihood that a person will take action. While you absolutely cannot be prepared for every possible event that might transpire, taking first aid classes and receiving CPR training could help you feel more competent and prepared to deal with potential emergencies. When faced with an emergency situation, knowing what to do greatly increase the possibility that a person will take action. People are also more likely to help others if they think that the person truly deserves it. In one classic study, participants were more likely to give money to a stranger if they believed that the individual's wallet had been stolen rather than that the person had simply spent all his money. This might explain why some people are more willing to give money to the homeless while others are not. Those who believe that homeless people are in their situation due to laziness or unwillingness to work are less likely to give money, while those who believe that these individuals are genuinely deserving of help are more likely to provide help (“How to Overcome the Bystander Effect”).
In conclusion, if a person is to intervene, they must first notice the event, they must interpret the situation as an emergency, and they must decide that it is their personal responsibility to act. At each

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