Buddhist Utopia

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Comparing and Contrasting More’s Utopia with a Buddhist Utopia Nothing could be further apart than the society depicted by Thomas More and an ideal Buddhist society. That may be what is first conveyed to people when they consider these two vastly different societies in a comparative manner. The first indicator of these extreme differences is that the Buddhist utopia is very much a mental one, while More’s utopia is more so a place where things are just in their perfected state. That being said, they also have a lot in common, such as the socialist approach to their respective societies. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to inform the reader of the similarities and differences between More’s Utopia and a Buddhist utopia. …show more content…
This is because each of them lacks a desire for many worldly possessions. This is known by the way every utopian has roughly the same house and possessions as each other (More 71). They also lack a monetary system which is only typically able to function in socialist societies. A Buddhist on the other hand, would simply lack any will for worldly possession. We know this by looking at one of the four noble truths,”Pain and suffering is caused by attachments and desires” (Davis 757). They would put in work to keep the society afloat, but would strive for the bare minimum in terms of items. In this way, they are very similar in their lack of worldly …show more content…
Some things that work in one society may not go over well in the other, such as the way these societies think and their religious tolerance. That being said, it is important to note the common ground in both More’s depicted utopia and a Buddhist utopia. An understanding of many of the things that are common throughout all utopic societies may be the bedrock of forming a utopia in our own world. This is because if something works in a multitude of these depicted societies there is a higher chance that these concepts will work in real life. That is why it is important to look critically into these two utopic societies as their ideals may form the basis of what not to do and what we should do when going forward in creating new

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