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Brutality In Gladiator's Bloody Spectacle

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Brutality In Gladiator's Bloody Spectacle
Ancient Roman culture was a clear portrayal of duality; despite being highly developed and sophisticated, it was built upon a foundation of blood, cruelty and brutality. These qualities led to an absolute fascination with the gladiatorial games, which became an integral aspect of Roman society for hundreds of years. From its religious origins, the gladiatorial games evolved into defining Roman culture, furthermore playing a role in its decline. Entertaining the crowds was the top priority for Roman emperors, apparent in the exaggerated methods used in combat. A number of factors lead to the decline of the gladiatorial games, particularly the rise of Christianity and its association with bloodshed and slavery.

Characteristics of brutality,
…show more content…
11). For the Roman populous, blood offerings were an intrinsic aspect of funeral gatherings, a fact acknowledged by sociologist Keith Hopkins, who states that they acted as a, “reconciliation for the deceased with the living.” Expanding on from this idea the text ‘GladiatorRome’s Bloody Spectacle’ explores the concept that, in the hope to placate the deceased with human blood, the Romans sacrificed prisoners of war and slaves, and decided to, “add pleasure through Gladiatorial fighting” (Nossov 2009, p. 12). Oft Cited historian, Konstantin Nossov suggests that, by the end of the Third Century B.C, Rome controlled the “entire Mediterranean along …show more content…
By the end of the third century AD, the Roman Empire was beginning to become undone, with multiple frontiers falling to Barbaric, Gothic and Persian attacks. A definitive opinion is expressed by Hubbard (2011 p. 107) who suggests that, the outer reaches of the empire experienced the downfall most acutely, hence why there was not enough money for the provinces to organise the gladiatorial games. It is difficult to find dissent in his argument, which is supported particularly strongly by Nossov (2009), and also noted by Cartwright (2012) and Hopkins (2007). It became obvious that the symbolic core of the Roman Empire, despite providing vast amounts of wealth and prosperity, elements of spiritual guidance were lacking. The introduction of Christianity filled this spiritual void, fore fronted by Emperor Tiberius during the middle imperial age. Motives associated with the bloody aspect of the gladiatorial games were threatened by Christianity, whereby the view was that battles to the death, and executions for public entertainment were “morally corrupt and against the doctrine of Christianity” (Hubbard 2011 p. 108). Moreover, Hubbard explores that fact that the gladiatorial games were falling into decline, as a result of Emperor Constantine’s conversion to Christianity and public statement which outlined that, “in times

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