Bruce Dawe Speech

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The poem ‘Life Cycle’ traces the life of an Aussie Rules Football supporter from birth to death – hence the title ‘Life Cycle’. ‘Life Cycle’ essentially explains that you are born and raised in a house with a family who influence your every move and important lifestyle choices. Dawe demonstrates how something as simple as sport can be more important throughout a person’s entire life
Poetry expresses an individual’s most intense emotions in the least amount of words. In the poems ‘Enter Without So Much As Knocking’ and ‘Life Cycle’ Bruce Dawe expresses what the true Australian perspective is in his straight forward way of telling people what living in Australia is like.

Dawe highlights Australian society in the 1960’s in his poem ‘Enter Without So Much As Knocking’ through its episodic structure, simple colloquial language and a combination of the figurative techniques to address the increased commercialism and apathy in the 1960’s. Dawe writes of a rapid trip through one man’s life from birth to death and seems to emphasise a life with little meaning. and shared by everybody whose lives basically revolve around football. Another way Dawe shows the perspective that Australians love sport is his use of biblical allusion, showing that football supporters form their own religion or covenant as represented in the poem by stating “and the covenant is sealed”.
Another method of proving how passionate Australians are about their love for sport is by ANZAC allusion. Comparing players to soldiers and warriors highlight the level of respect that they are shown to have for their beloved football club. Thus, the poem is a light-hearted look at the importance of football to the Victorians.

than religion, so much to even say that it replaces it.
He explains, through the constant use of colloquialism, that some Australian families have sport engraved into their daily routine and use it to bond with each other. “Oohh you bludger” is an accurate example of this

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