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Brookhaven

By penisface69 Apr 18, 2013 39585 Words
Brookhaven School District
Secondary Student Handbook

Alexander Jr. High Brookhaven High Brookhaven Technical Center Mullins Alternative School

2012 - 2013


 


 




PANTHER PRIDE!


The Brookhaven School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or disability in the provision of educational programs and services or employment opportunities and benefits.

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_______________________________________________________________

Alexander Jr. High School
Rod Henderson, Principal Dr. Thomas Ann Gatlin, Assistant Principal Randy Spring, Assistant Principal Stacy Walker, Counselor 713 Beauregard Street Phone: 601-833-7549 Fax: 601-835-5467

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Brookhaven High School
David Martin, Principal Debra Price, Assistant Principal Patrick Hardy, Assistant Principal Felicia Durr, Counselor Tracy Risher, Counselor Stepheniesa Butler, Counselor 443 E. Monticello Street Phone: 601-833-4498 Fax: 601-823-3792

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Brookhaven Technical Center
Jackie Martin, Director Herschel O’Bannon, Counselor
325 E. Court Street Phone: 601-833-8335 Fax: 601-835-3985

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Fannie L. Mullins Alternative School
Trevor Brister, Principal
711 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive Phone: 601-833-7472 Fax: 601-823-6598

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Table of Contents
District Purpose Statement ............................................................................................................................ 9 District Philosophy Statement ....................................................................................................................... 9 District Direction Statement .......................................................................................................................... 9 School District Leadership .......................................................................................................................... 10 School Hours ............................................................................................................................................... 11 District Calendar.......................................................................................................................................... 13 School Registration/Attendance ................................................................................................................... Enrollment ...................................................................................................................................... 14 Residency Verification ................................................................................................................... 14 Student Arrival ............................................................................................................................... 15 Tardiness ........................................................................................................................................ 15 Check In/Out Procedures ............................................................................................................... 16 Absence .......................................................................................................................................... 16 Transfer/Withdrawal ...................................................................................................................... 17 Change of Address/Telephone ....................................................................................................... 18 Student Health and Safety Immunization ................................................................................................................................. 18 Birth Certificate .............................................................................................................................. 18 First Aid.......................................................................................................................................... 18 Healthcare Services ........................................................................................................................ 18 Return to School After Illness ........................................................................................................ 18 Medications .................................................................................................................................... 18 Drills (tornado, fire, natural disaster, etc.) ..................................................................................... 19 Emergency Closing ........................................................................................................................ 19 Child Nutrition ............................................................................................................................... 19 Academics Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................... 22 SATP 2 ........................................................................................................................................... 24 Graduation Fees .............................................................................................................................. 24 Dropping a Class ............................................................................................................................ 25 Grading ........................................................................................................................................... 25 Promotion/Retention ...................................................................................................................... 26 Exemptions and Exams .................................................................................................................. 26 Honor Roll ...................................................................................................................................... 26 Credit Recovery .............................................................................................................................. 26 Online and Correspondence Courses ............................................................................................. 27 Transcripts and Other Educational Records ................................................................................... 27 National Junior Honor Society and National Honor Society .................................................................................................................. 27 Advanced Placement ...................................................................................................................... 28 Class Rank ...................................................................................................................................... 28 Valedictorian & Salutatorian .......................................................................................................... 28 Textbooks ....................................................................................................................................... 28 5
 
 



 
 Homework ...................................................................................................................................... 29 Parent/Teacher Conferences ........................................................................................................... 29 Three Tier Process .......................................................................................................................... 29 Technology ..................................................................................................................................... 29 Homebound Instruction .................................................................................................................. 30 Special Education ........................................................................................................................... 30 Progress Reports ............................................................................................................................. 30 Report Cards ................................................................................................................................... 30 Cheating ......................................................................................................................................... 30 Brookhaven Technical Center BTC Mission Statement ................................................................................................................. 31 National Technical Honor Society ................................................................................................. 31 Fees................................................................................................................................................. 31 Insurance for Students .................................................................................................................... 32 Extra Curricular Activities Field Trips ...................................................................................................................................... 32 Clubs............................................................................................................................................... 32 AJH Sounds of Success .................................................................................................................. 32 Elections ......................................................................................................................................... 32 Student Council ................................................................................................................. 32 Who’s Who ....................................................................................................................... 33 Homecoming ..................................................................................................................... 33 Athletics ......................................................................................................................................... 34 Cheerleader Selection and Information ............................................................................. 34 Eligibility for Athletics ..................................................................................................... 34 Student Athlete Drug Testing ............................................................................................ 34 Discipline/ Student Code of Conduct District Discipline Policies Introduction ........................................................................................ 35 Classroom Management ................................................................................................................. 35 Code of Conduct............................................................................................................................. 37 Weapons ............................................................................................................................ 37 Unlawful or Violent Acts .................................................................................................. 39 Severe Disruptions ............................................................................................................ 39 Zero Tolerance .................................................................................................................. 39 Attendance ......................................................................................................................... 40 Personal Appearance/Dress Code ..................................................................................... 40 Title IX .............................................................................................................................. 41 School Searches ................................................................................................................ 42 Family Educational Rights and Privacy ............................................................................ 42 Parental Responsibility ...................................................................................................... 43 Drug Testing Policy .......................................................................................................... 43 Gang Activity .................................................................................................................... 43 Bus Conduct ...................................................................................................................... 44 Vandalism ......................................................................................................................... 44 Participation in School Programs and Activities............................................................... 44 Student Handbook ............................................................................................................. 44 Discipline Plan Statement ................................................................................................. 44 6
 
 



 
 Bullying ............................................................................................................................. 44 Discipline Plan ............................................................................................................................... 46 School Bus Regulations ................................................................................................................. 50 Assembly Programs ........................................................................................................................ 51 Corridors......................................................................................................................................... 51 Cell Phones and Other Electronic Devices .................................................................................... 51 Care of Materials and School Facilities ......................................................................................... 51 Fannie L. Mullins Alternative School ...................................................................................................... 52 Discrimination/Compliance FERPA ........................................................................................................................................... 53 Child Find ....................................................................................................................................... 53 Section 504/ADA ........................................................................................................................... 54 Financial Hardship/Fee Policy ....................................................................................................... 54 Title I Parental Involvement ........................................................................................................... 55 NCLB Right to Know .................................................................................................................... 56 Homeless ........................................................................................................................................ 57 English Language Learner Services ............................................................................................... 57 Other School and Classroom Visits.......................................................................................................... 57 Deliveries ....................................................................................................................................... 57 Use of Office Telephone ................................................................................................................ 58 Parent & Bus Pick-Up, Students Walking Home ........................................................................... 58 Student Parking .............................................................................................................................. 58 Soliciting ........................................................................................................................................ 58 Daily Changes in Transportation .................................................................................................... 58 Parent Pick-Up ............................................................................................................................... 58 Valuables ........................................................................................................................................ 58 Role of P.T.A… ............................................................................................................................. 58 BHS Focus Book Appendix (Parents should read and sign all applicable forms in this section and return them to your child’s school) Handbook Acknowledgment Form Written Excuse Form Non-Corporal Punishment Agreement Form Use of Internet and Other Electronic Resources Policy and Permission Form BSD Administering of Medication Policy and Form BHS Disciplinary Actions for Team Rule Violations AJH Football Schedule BHS Football Schedule BHS Alma Mater

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DISTRICT PURPOSE STATEMENT The purpose of our district is to equip students today for tomorrow’s opportunities. DISTRICT PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT Democratic citizens believe that all children and youth have equal moral worth. Education is the concern of all. The home, school, church and community share in giving children a firm foundation on which to grow. Since education is a cooperative undertaking, the philosophy of education in the Brookhaven School District is: • To provide for every child, regardless of ability, environment or status, the opportunity to develop to his/her highest capacity – physically, socially, morally, and spiritually – so that he/she will become an effective member of society, capable and desirous of making definite, positive contribution to that society; To adapt our method of instruction to the individual as well as to the group; to set up goals within the grasp of the pupil’s understanding; to train the mind to think critically; to afford opportunities for practical applications; to arouse curiosity and to stimulate further study; To lead the pupil into active participation in the learning process and to guide and inspire him/her; To continually evaluate, revise and maintain a varied and flexible curriculum which will meet the changing needs of society; and To take our community into our confidence and discuss, plan and work out together our educational problems under the professional leadership and guidance which we are able to give.



• • •

DISTRICT DIRECTION STATEMENT Knowing that we are preparing the majority of our students today for careers of tomorrow, the Brookhaven School District is committed to ensuring a quality learning experience for every student. This experience is focused on developing analytical, strategic problem solvers that will be able to adapt to an ever changing economical and social landscape. Our number one priority is students. It is our belief that all students have equal moral worth and that all students can grow and learn. We commit ourselves to doing what is best for the boys and girls in each of our classrooms. All facets of the school program shall embody the ideals which will ultimately lead to the development of critical and analytical decision-making skills, a strong work ethic, constructive citizenship, and recognition of the worth of other individuals.

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Brookhaven School District Leadership 2012-2013 Board of Trustees Mrs. Karen Braden, Chairman Mr. Willie Harrison, Vice Chairman Mr. Stan Patrick, Secretary Mr. Dan Brown, Member Mrs. Erin Smith, Member

District Administrators
Dr. Lisa Karmacharya…………………………………………………..……………………Superintendent Ms. Anjanette Zinke………………………..……..Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction Ms. Stephanie Henderson………….…………………….…….Director of Assessment and Accountability Ms. Susan Quin ....……..…….……………………...……............................…………. Director of Finance Mr. Daniel Rushing……………………………………………………..…… Director of Federal Programs Ms. Brandy Myers. ………………...……..........................................................Director of Special Services Mr. Clay Whittington…………………………………………..………………...……….Director of Bands Ms. Tonya Thomas-McSweyn…………………..……..………………….….....Director of Child Nutrition Mr. Joe Morgan….………………………………………………..……………….Director of Maintenance Mr. Dustin Matthews..………...…………………………………...……..………....Director of Technology Mr. Versie Rushing ..…………………..…………………………...…………..16th Section Land Manager Mr. Eric Stokes….………………………..………………………...……………Director of Transportation Mr. Tommy Clopton.……………………..……………..………….………………….Director of Athletics

Contact Information
Central Office …………………………………………………….....................……………….…833-6661 Special Services………………………………………………….…………………….………..…835-1211 Child Nutrition……………………………………………………………….……………………833-2886 Transportation……………………………………………………………………..……………….835-1806 Bus Barn………………………………………………………………………..……………….…835-1788 School Office Hours 8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. Superintendent’s Office Hours 8:00 A.M. – 4:30 P.M.

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ALEXANDER JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DAILY SCHEDULE
SCHEDULE 1-REGULAR
Report to Campus……………………………………...…………………………...………………………………7:20 Report to Homeroom………………………..……………..…………………………...….……………………….7:40 Period 1…………………………………………………………..…………………..……...………………...7:50-9:00 Period 2……………………………………………………………..……………..……………...………….9:05-10:15 BREAK: 7th Grade.……...9:50-10:00 8th Grade.……..10:05-10:15 Period 3…………………………………………………………………..……..…………...……………...10:20-11:25 Period 4………………………………………………………………………...………...……..(LUNCH) 11:30-12:50 7th grade Lunch: 11:30 to 12:05 8th grade Lunch: 12:10 to 12:45 Period 5…………………...………………………………………………………..…..…………………….12:55-2:00 Period 6………………………...……………...……………………………....................................................2:05-3:10 CHANNEL ONE…………………...……………………………..………………..........................................3:10-3:15 ANNOUNCEMENTS AND DISMISSAL DETENTION.......3:15‐4:00


SCHEDULE 2-PEP RALLY/PANTHER PERIOD
Report to Campus………………………...……………………………………...…………………………………7:20 Report to Homeroom………………..………...……………………………………...…………………………….7:40 Period 1……………………………………………...…………………………………………………...……7:50-9:00 Period 2 …………...……………………………………...……………………..………….....……….…… 9:05-10:15 BREAK: 7th Grade……..9:50-10:00 8th Grade……..10:05-10:15 Period 3…………………...……………………………………………………………………………...…10:20-11:25 Period 4………………………...……………………………………………...………………..(LUNCH) 11:30-12:50 7th Grade Lunch: 11:30 to 12:05 8th Grade Lunch: 12:10 to 12:45 Period 5…………………………...……………………………………………………………………….…12:55-2:00 Period 6………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2:05-3:10 Panther Period………………………...…………………………..………………..........................................2:10-2:40 PEP
RALLY….....2:45‐3:15


SCHEDULE 3-EARLY RELEASE DAYS
Report to Campus………………………...……………………………………………………………….……..…7:20 Report to Homeroom………………………….....……………………………………………………….………...7:40 Period 1……………………………………………...……………………………………………………..….7:50-8:25 Period 2…………………………………………………...………………………………………………...…8:35-9:10 Period 3………………………………………………………...……………………………..…..…………...9:20-9:55 Period 5………………...…………………..………………………………………………………......….. 10:05-10:40 Period 6…………………...……………………………………………………………………………..….10:50-11:25 Period 4…………………………………..……………………………...…................................(LUNCH)11:35-12:50 ANNOUNCEMENTS/DISMISSAL……...12:50‐1:00

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BROOKHAVEN HIGH SCHOOL DAILY SCHEDULE
Bell Schedule 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period (Lunch) 4 Period 5 Period 6 Period th th th rd nd st

7:45 – 9:21 9:26 – 11:02 11:07 – 12:40 12:45 – 1:33 1:38 – 2:26 2:31 – 3:19

Early Release Days 1st Period 2nd Period 3rd Period (Lunch) 4th Period 5th Period 6th Period 7:45-8:50 8:55-10:00 10:05-11:10 11:15-11:45 11:50-12:20 12:25-1:00

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Progress Report Dates: September 11th November 15th February 7th April 22nd 13
 
 


Report Card Dates: October 15th January 14th March 22nd May 29th


 


SCHOOL
REGISTRATION/
ATTENDANCE

ENROLLMENT
All students must provide the school with the following information upon enrolling in school for the first time or reentering after interrupted attendance: •Immunization Records •Certified Birth Certificate •Withdrawal Report •Copy of Social Security Card •Medicaid Number (if applicable) •Notice of Special Needs •Two (2) Proofs of Residency - A post office box address will not be accepted. The school may require additional documentation or verification at any time, particularly if there is a discrepancy or a reason to question a student’s listed address. Two of the following items may be used for address verification: •Property tax records •Apartment/Home lease or rental records •Automobile registration •Mortgage documents or property deeds •Current utility bills (within 30-45 days) •Filed homestead exemption •Other valid documentation as determined by school or district administration

RESIDENCY VERIFICATION
As a result of the residency verification procedure adopted by the Mississippi State Board of Education, annually each parent, legal guardian or custodian with whom the student lives must provide the school administration a verification of residency on the form provided at your school. If you already have this form on file you are still required to submit the form annually as well as if you should change your residence. Students enrolling for the first time should report with their parent or guardian to the school office for enrollment information. Two proofs of residency are required prior to enrollment. New students are enrolled on a temporary basis until a certified birth certificate and transcript of schoolwork are received. These must be received within 30 days. AFFIDAVIT OF RESIDENCY If a student is living in the district in the household of someone other than parent or guardian [either with or without student’s parent or guardian] then an affidavit of residency must be completed. The affidavit must be signed by the homeowner/leaseholder AND by the parent or guardian. The homeowner/leaseholder must provide two proofs of residency, and both the parent/guardian and the homeowner/leaseholder must provide positive picture identification. “False swearing” of an affidavit has a fine of up to $1000 and imprisonment for up to five years. School personnel WILL VERIFY by home visit the accuracy of affidavit registrations. Affidavit registrations are considered temporary (30 days), in order for the students’ 14
 
 



 


parent to start receiving official mail or other proof of residence within the district. Those who lack certain documents may be given temporary enrollment by school personnel, with specific guidance on when the items should be returned to school. Failure to comply could result in disenrollment.

STUDENT ARRIVAL
To help ensure that there is a safe and orderly environment: 1. There will be no students on campus before 7:20 a.m. 2. At 7:30 a.m., any student who wishes to eat breakfast will go to the cafeteria. 3. At 7:40 a.m., students will report to their first period classes. 4. At AJH, the first class will begin at 7:50. At BHS, the first class will begin at 7:45. Upon arrival, BHS Students should report to their 1st period classroom. At AJH, students should report to the auditorium until 7:40, and then will be dismissed to their 1st period class.

TARDINESS
Promptness is a virtue that becomes a habit. Students are expected to be in class on time each period. Parents who transport their children to school are encouraged to have students at school on time. Students who are late must check in through the attendance office. Parents must accompany students to the office if arriving to school after 8:00. BHS Tardy Policy 2012-2013 1. Three (3) tardies to any class, regardless of the length of time of the tardy, will be counted as an absence in that class. Excessive tardiness will result in additional disciplinary action. Note: A tardy of 30 minutes or more is counted as an absence in the class. Failure to report to class at all will be considered truancy. 2. Students arriving after 7:50 a.m. must check in with the attendance office. 3. All students who enter a classroom late will be issued an afternoon detention by the teacher to be served on the following school day from 3:25 p.m. until 3:45 p.m. 4. All detentions will be served in a central location and will be monitored by an assistant principal or another designee as assigned by the school principal. 5. Students will not be admitted to detention after 3:25 p.m. Students who are late to detention will be issued a second detention and must serve both. 6. Detentions issued on Fridays will be served the following Monday. Detentions issued on days preceding a holiday will be served on the second school day after students return from the holiday. Example: If detention is issued on Friday, and Monday is a holiday, students will serve the detention on Wednesday which would be the second day after students returned from the holiday. 7. If a student fails to appear for an assigned detention, a second detention will be assigned. Students must now serve both detentions. Students who fail to serve either of these detentions, or report late to either of these detentions will be issued an out of school suspension for one day. 8. Once a student receives an out of school suspension, the detentions are forgiven and the policy repeats itself. 9. The administration reserves the right to administer alternative consequences for students who are habitually tardy to class. Habitual is defined as being tardy more than four times per nine week period.

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CHECK IN/OUT PROCEDURES
All students must have a CHECK IN/CHECK OUT form on file in the attendance office. A new form is required each year, and a parent/guardian must bring this to the attendance clerk. Students may only be checked in late or checked out early by a person on their form. NO PHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR CHECK IN OR CHECK OUT. This is for students’ safety

ABSENCE
EXCUSED ABSENCE The following constitute a valid excuse for temporary non-attendance in school: A. Prior approved authorized school activity. B. Illness or injury. C. Isolation required by health official. D. Death or serious illness of a member of immediate family E. Prior approved medical or dental appointment. F. Attendance at the proceedings of a court or administrative tribunal if the student is a party to the action or under subpoena as a witness. G. Prior approved absence for a religious event. H. Prior approved valid educational opportunity. I. Other prior approved conditions sufficient to warrant non-attendance. Seniors will be allowed two (2) absences for college visits. These days will not count toward the number allowed. Request for college days must be made to the attendance clerk at least five (5) days prior to the day requested. THE WRITTEN EXCUSE The student must present a signed written excuse from a parent, guardian or custodian within three (3) days of the student returning to school unless permission to be absent was granted by a school official before the absence occurred. The written excuse should be provided on the required district form contained in this handbook. Additional copies can be obtained from the front office of the school UNEXCUSED ABSENCE All absences other than excused absences will be classified unexcused. Days missed from school due to disciplinary suspension are considered unexcused absences. Every student is given equal opportunity to make up the work in every class he/she has missed no matter why he/she was absent. MAKE-UP It is the student’s responsibility to make up work due to an absence. All work shall be made up for excused and unexcused absences. Make-up shall begin immediately upon the return of the student to school. The number of days allowed for a student to make up missed work will be equal to the number of days missed. (Example: If a student misses three (3) days he/she will have three (3) days to make up missed work for excused absence.) It is the responsibility of the student, on the first day back to school, to arrange with the teachers for the assignment of missed work. Failure to complete the work in the time period specified will result in a grade of zero “0” for the missed work. If the absence is pre-planned, students are encouraged to arrange for make-up work prior to the absence. ABSENCES AFFECTING LOSS OF ACADEMIC CREDIT Student’s unexcused absence from school for more than ten (10) school days or unexcused absence from the same class period more than ten (10) times in one semester shall be recommended by the principal to the superintendent for a denial of academic credit for the semester. A parent, guardian or custodian shall be 16
 
 



 


notified by registered mail after the fifth (5th) unexcused absence. Extenuating circumstances causing absences in excess of ten (10) school days or ten (10) class periods per semester may be considered by the principal and the superintendent on an individual basis. It shall be the responsibility of the parent, guardian, or custodian to furnish to school officials, no later than the close of business on the third (3rd) school day following the student’s return to school, sufficient and satisfactory documentation which supports a claim of extenuating circumstances. In the event the superintendent elects to deny a student academic credit for a semester due to unexcused absences, he/she shall at the time of his/her determination send written notice by registered mail to the student and his/her parent, guardian, or custodian informing them of his/her decision. The student, parent, guardian, or custodian may, within seven (7) calendar days of the date of notice, request a fair and impartial hearing before the School board. Should the student, parent, guardian, or custodian fail to request said hearing within seven (7) calendar days of the date of notice, the decision of the superintendent becomes final and effective. The School Board, upon request for hearing from the student, parent, guardian, or custodian, shall set the time, place, and date of such hearing and notify the student, parent, guardian, or custodian in writing of same. The date shall be set not later than thirty (30) days from the date of request, unless otherwise agreed. At such hearing, student, parent, guardian, or custodian shall have the right to be present (in person and/or with legal counsel) and participate in the hearing, to crossexamine the witness heard and to offer such witnesses or other evidence in their behalf as they may desire. ATTENDANCE AND SCHOOL ACTIVITIES No student can represent the school in any activity or practice on any school day unless he/she has been in attendance in each academic class on the day of such participation. The only exception will be excused absences approved by the principal. Any student absent any part of the school day must have the approval of the principal before the sponsoring teacher will permit the student to participate in a school activity on the day of the absence. Students must attend at least one half day on the Friday immediately preceding participation in ANY school activity on a Saturday. This includes being allowed to attend prom on Saturday evening. Special permission may be granted by the principal upon written request by the parent with proper documentation of illness or family emergencies. ATTENDANCE AND DROP FROM ENROLLMENT 1. Attendance is checked daily and submitted to the office 2. All students are required to be at school and in class on time. In the event students are detained, an admission slip by the detaining teacher or the office is needed. 3. All students are to remain on campus the entire day, except when given permission to be away from campus. 4. No student is to be absent from scheduled classes or activities at any time without the permission of the principal beforehand. 5. All permits to leave the building and campus are to be issued by the principal. Students absent from school for 20 consecutive days will be dropped from the school register and reported to the district’s school attendance officer. PROM ATTENDANCE 1. Only 11th and 12th graders may attend the BHS Prom. 2. 10th graders are permitted to attend as a date of an 11th or 12th grader with prior approval from the principal. 3. Any date of a BHS junior or senior cannot be above the age of 21 to attend.

TRANSFER/WITHDRAWAL
Parents should notify the teachers and office staff at least a week before the student is to be withdrawn from the school. All textbooks and library books should be returned before records can be forwarded. 17
 
 



 


CHANGE OF ADDRESS/TELEPHONE
Parents must notify the school immediately upon any change of home address and telephone number affecting the student. Any change of address requires that two (2) new proofs of residency be provided.

STUDENT
HEALTH
AND
SAFETY

IMMUNIZATION
The School Board requires that all students have Certificates of Vaccination issued by the local health department or family physician on forms specified by the Mississippi State Board of Health. These forms shall be the only acceptable means of showing compliance with these immunization requirements. The Certification of Immunization will be filed with each student’s records.

BIRTH CERTIFICATE
All students registering for the first time must submit a Certified Birth Certificate at the time of registration.

FIRST AID
Students who get cuts and bruises at school will be treated at school for these minor injuries. In case of serious accidents that need to be treated by a medical doctor, every effort will be made to reach the parents; however, if we fail to reach them, the principal will use his/her own discretion in seeking medical assistance.

HEALTHCARE SERVICES
In order to provide appropriate services for our students, the parent/guardian must provide the following health information to the school at the beginning of each school year. A Student Health Record must be completed by the parent/guardian with current and accurate health information. Parents/guardians of students with diagnosed special health needs/problems will be responsible for providing and maintaining any specific health care information, including physician’s orders and medications as prescribed.

RETURN TO SCHOOL AFTER ILLNESS
A student who has an infectious or contagious disease known to be spread through casual contact shall be excluded from school until the danger of transmitting the infection or disease to other students has passed. The requirement for readmission will be a certificate from the Lincoln County Health Department or the child’s physician. SECTION 41-79-21, MISSISSIPPI CODE OF 1972, requires the principal to notify the county health department after the third incident of head lice during a school year for a student and that the student obtain proof of treatment from the county health department in order to return to school.

MEDICATIONS
In order to protect the safety of your child, the Brookhaven School District requires that all students who need medication during school hours must do the following: 1. For prescription medications: A. The “Administering Medication to Students” form must be completed and signed by the physician and by the parent/guardian, and brought to the school office. B. The medication must be in the original prescription bottle, properly labeled for the student by a registered pharmacist as prescribed by the physician. (Note: Check with your pharmacist for a duplicate bottle to keep one at home as needed.) C. The medication must be brought to the school office by an adult, not sent with the student. 2. For over-the-counter (non-prescription) medications: 18
 
 



 


A. The “Administering Medication to Students” form must be completed and signed by the physician and by the parent/guardian, and brought to the school office. B. Non-prescription medication must also be in the original container and labeled with the student’s name. C. The medication must be brought to the school office by an adult, not sent with the student. The principal at each school will designate who will be responsible for administering medication at their school. A medication administration record will be maintained for each student taking medication at school. Medications will be stored in a specifically designated, secure storage location. STUDENTS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO TRANSPORT MEDICATION TO SCHOOL WITH THE EXCEPTION OF AN ASTHMA INHALER AND/OR ANAPHYLAXIS MEDICATION (EPI-PEN) AS PRESCRIBED BY A PHYSICIAN TO BE CARRIED AND SELF-ADMINISTERED BY THE STUDENT. IF A STUDENT USES HIS/HER ASTHMA AND/OR ANAPHYLAXIS MEDICATION IN A MANNER OTHER THAN PRESCRIBED, HE/SHE MAY BE SUBJECT TO DISCIPLINARY ACTION UNDER THE SCHOOL CODE. THE DISCIPLINARY ACTION SHALL NOT LIMIT OR RESTRICT THE STUDENT’S IMMEDIATE ACCESS TO THE ASTHMA AND/OR ANAPHYLAXIS MEDICATION.

DRILLS
A crisis management plan for the evacuation of school buildings in the event of fire, tornado, or other unforeseen disturbance can be found in the individual classrooms of all schools. Each student will be made aware of this plan and taught the proper procedures in the event of an emergency. The proper number of safety drills will be conducted each year – 9 for fire, 2 for tornado, 2 for lock down, 2 for caution/stand by, and 2 for bus.

EMERGENCY CLOSING
The following media sources will be contacted to make announcements regarding school closings: Radio stations WKMB, WCHJ, and WMRQ Telephone calls via School Messenger District Website – www.brookhaven.k12.ms.us The above listed media will be asked to make announcements beginning at 6:00 a.m. if school will be closed. It is important that parents not try to contact administrative personnel, as the lines will be busy making arrangements for emergency closings. If it becomes necessary to close school early, announcements will be made on the radio and information will be posted to the district webpage.

CHILD NUTRITION
We are committed to the serving of safe, healthy and quality meals in our efforts to support the academic vision and mission of the Brookhaven School District. Please do not hesitate to contact the Child Nutrition Office with any concerns at 601-833-2886. Policy on Competition and Extra Food Sales On February 22, 1985, the State Board of Education passed the following policy on the selling of foods in competition with the National School Food Service Programs and on the nutritional quality if foods sold extra: To ensure that children are not in the position of having to decide between non-nutritious and nutritious foods immediately before or during any meal service period. (a) No food is to be sold on the school campus for one (1) hour before the start of any meal service period. 19
 
 



 


(b)

The school food service staff shall serve only those foods, which are components of the approved federal meal patterns being served (or milk products) and such additional foods as necessary to meet the caloric requirements of the age group being served. (c) With the exceptions of milk products, a student may purchase individual components of the meal only if the full meal unit also is being purchased. (d) Students who bring lunch from home may purchase milk products only. (e) This policy should be viewed as a minimum standard. Local boards of education are encouraged to develop more comprehensive restrictions. Clarification and/or Interpretation of Competitive Foods Rule (a) No food is to be sold on campus for one hour before breakfast or one hour before lunch and until the end of either serving period. Any food may be sold after breakfast and until one hour before lunch. (b)&(c) After the full meal has been served; a student may purchase individual components or milk products as extra sales. The old rule that a food item must be on the menu to be sold no longer applies. The new rule is that a food must be a component of the meal to be sold extra. (d) Students who bring lunch can purchase only milk and ice cream. (e) Self explanatory Food service for profit or sales in competition with the National School Lunch Program shall not be operated in the cafeteria at any time during the day. Snack item, such as soft drinks, candies, nabs, potato chips, pop corn, popsicles, etc., including those meeting nutritional requirements, cannot be sold in the cafeteria at any time during the school day and cannot be sold in the school during the designated meal service period. Offer vs. Serve Policy The regulation, which allows students to choose less than all of the food items within the lunch pattern, is known as the “Offer versus Serve Provision”. All schools in the Brookhaven School District implement “offer vs. serve”. All five food items of the school lunch must be offered and students must choose at least three of these items for their lunch to be reimbursable. One of the three MUST be fruit or a vegetable. The mandate allows students to refuse two of the five menu items they do not intend to eat, thus reducing plate waste. The choice of three or four items does not relieve the non-needy child from paying full price of the meal. The “offer vs. serve” provision applies also in the school breakfast program. All food is served attractively to entice the students to choose all food items in both the lunch and breakfast program. A la Carte A la Carte meal service for students and/or adults is not permitted. Each meal must be priced and served as a unit. Any food item that is not a meal component cannot be sold. Extra food sales are meal components that may be sold in addition to the school lunch to participating students. Classroom Party Guidelines to Promote Health, Wellness and Safety The Mississippi Healthy Students Act, Senate Bill 2369, states that schools shall develop a food safety program to include all food offered to students through sale or service. The Brookhaven School District has developed the following guidelines to help insure food safety. • Classroom parties will be held for Christmas and Valentines only. All parties will be held after lunch to allow children the opportunity to have breakfast and lunch in the school cafeteria. • All faculty and students have access to proper hand washing facilities before eating. • Parents are encouraged to purchase items for parties instead of baking from scratch. Purchase from reputable vendors with current food service permits posted. • Food items served to children will be in single ready-to-serve packaging when practical and possible. • Parents and teachers are encouraged to provide fresh fruit and whole grain snacks when practical and possible. 20
 
 



 




When providing food for classroom parties, please follow the following food safety rules: a. Keep hot food hot. For food to remain safe, it should be held at 135° F or above. b. Keep cold food cold. For food to remain safe, it should be held at 41° F or lower.

Vending Machine Policy All snacks and beverages sold to students meet the nutritional guidelines stated in Vending Regulations for MS Public Schools as approved by State Board of Education October 20, 2006. Canned Drinks and Fast Food in the Cafeteria It is recommended that neither children nor adults bring canned or bottled drinks into the cafeteria, without the label being removed or covered with aluminum foil. It is further recommended that children or adults bring no “fast food” into the cafeteria. If a parent brings his or her child “fast food”, the food should be placed in a container other than the original container that promotes products which are in direct competition with the National School Lunch/Breakfast Program. Food shall not be delivered to children or adults. “Fast Food” deliveries could be an introduction point for alcohol, drugs, or weapons to the campus. “Fast Food” deliveries could also pose a sanitation problem by introducing food borne illness or pests. Food Substitutions Generally, children with food allergies or intolerances do not have a disability as defined under either Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act or Part B of IDEA. However, when stated in the licensed physician’s assessment that the food allergies result in life-threatening (anaphylactic) reactions, the child’s condition would meet the definition of “disability” and meal substitutions prescribed by the licensed physician would be made. Children with a disability which requires them not to consume certain food(s) must send a statement from a licensed physician. The physician’s statement must identify: 1. The child’s disability; 2. An explanation of why the disability restricts the child’s diet; 3. The major life activity affected by the disability; 4. The food or foods to be omitted from the child’s diet and the food or choice of foods that must be substituted. Once the Child Nutrition Office has received the statement from the doctor, the diet order cannot be changed without another statement from the doctor. Under no circumstances can the Child Nutrition staff change or revise the diet prescription once ordered by the physician. Statements from physicians must be updated YEARLY to reflect the current dietary needs of the child. It is important to understand that a school cannot provide appropriate food substitutions or modifications without an adequate diet order or prescription. Procedures for Accepting Checks Checks will be accepted for the amount of food service purchases only. Parents shall not be allowed to combine payment for meals with other school expenses, such as school pictures, etc. A family that sends more than two non-sufficient checks will be notified in writing that the Child Nutrition Department will not accept another check. A letter will be mailed by regular postal service to the parent or guardian.

21
 
 



 


Advance sales procedure Schools will accept payment in advance for lunch, breakfast and extra sales (juice and water). Parents are encouraged to pay in advance to decrease the risk of students losing their lunch money. Payment can be made weekly, monthly or by the semester. Advance payment will be accepted daily. Accounting for advance meals not utilized At any given time, the computer can provide the cashier the amount of money any student may have on their account. If there is money left on a child’s account at the end of the year the money will be carried over for the student to use next school year. Once money is placed on the account, it cannot be removed unless the student withdraws from school. If a child withdraws from school, the parent must submit in writing a request for refund. The letter must be mailed to the Child Nutrition Office at P.O. Box 540, Brookhaven, MS 39602. No charged meals Neither students nor adults will be allowed to charge meals. If a student forgets or loses his\her lunch money, they may check with the school office for procedures to borrow enough money for the day. This is the responsibility of the student as to repayment of the loan.

ACADEMICS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Course Requirements for entering 9th graders in 2008/2009 and after: BROOKHAVEN SCHOOL DISTRICT REGULAR DIPLOMA

Discipline
English Mathematics

Units
4 4

Required Subjects
English I, II, III, and IV Four of the following: (Two must be higher than Alg. I) Pre-Algebra Algebra I (required) Trans Algebra Geometry Algebra II AP Calculus Adv. Algebra Trigonometry Biology I - One unit must be a lab-based physical science chosen from the following: Physical Science Chemistry I Chemistry II AP Chemistry Physics I MS Studies / Geography World History U. S. Government / Economics U. S. History Keyboarding/Computer Apps. OR Computer Discovery

Science

4

Social Studies Health Physical Education Business & Technology The Arts Electives

4 ½ ½ 1

**Total
Units
Required



1 8____________________________________________________

27


22
 
 



 


CAREER PATHWAY OPTIONS DIPLOMA

Discipline
English Mathematics

Units
4 3

Required Subjects
English I, II, III, and IV Four of the following: (Two must be higher than Alg. I) Pre-Algebra Algebra I (required) Trans Algebra Geometry Algebra II AP Calculus Adv. Algebra Trigonometry Biology I - One unit must be a lab-based physical science chosen from the following: Physical Science Chemistry I Chemistry II AP Chemistry Physics I MS Studies / Geography World History U. S. Government / Economics U. S. History Keyboarding/Computer Apps. OR Computer Discovery

Science

3

Social Studies Health/Physical Education Integrated Technology

3 ½ 1

Career & Technical Education 4 Electives 2 ½ ____________________________________________________

**Total
Units
Required

 21

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING (IHL) PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN MISSISSIPPI (A student must still meet the requirements of the chosen diploma option listed above in order to receive a diploma from Brookhaven High School)

Discipline
English Mathematics

Units
4 4

Required Subjects
English I, II, III, and IV Four of the following: (Two must be higher than Alg. I) Pre-Algebra Algebra I (required) Trans Algebra Geometry Algebra II AP Calculus Adv. Algebra Trigonometry Biology I - One unit must be a lab-based physical science chosen from the following: Physical Science Chemistry I Chemistry II AP Chemistry Physics I MS Studies / Geography World History U. S. Government / Economics U. S. History Keyboarding/Computer Apps. OR Computer Discovery ____________________________________________________

Science

4

Social Studies Health Physical Education Business & Technology The Arts Advanced Electives

4 ½ ½ ½ 1 2

**Total
Units
Required

 19
½



23
 
 



 


ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS (SATP 2)
Regular Diploma

In addition to earning the district-required number of Carnegie units, students must also meet requirements of state assessments (US History from 1877, English II, Biology I, and Algebra I). A student’s graduation th requirements are determined by the year he/she enters 9 grade. According to Mississippi State Board of education Policy IHF-2, any Mississippi public school student who fails to pass a required Subject Area Test will be offered a chance to retake the test three times each year until a passing score is achieved. The purpose of a Subject Area Test is to serve as a diagnostic tool providing mastery information to parents, students, teachers, and administrators regarding the content area being assessed. All students enrolled in the courses involved in the Subject Area Testing Program must pass both the course and the Subject Area Test in order to graduate from Brookhaven High School. If a student does not make a passing score on a Subject Area Test, a remediation program that meets the needs of the individual student will be implemented. Remediation may include, but shall not be limited to, requiring the student to repeat the course, participate in after school or in school tutoring, or auditing the course.

GRADUATION FEES (subject to change)
CAPS AND GOWNS 1. The fee to cover the rental of caps and gowns, stoles, the diploma, and the diploma cover is $55.00 (based on 2010-11 prices which are SUBJECT TO CHANGE) Diploma $5.50 Diploma Cover $8.50 Rental of Cap, Gown, Tassel (Students keep tassel) $25.00 Red Stole (student keeps) $16.00 TOTAL $55.00 Cash or money orders only…no checks, please. This must be paid when seniors pick up caps and gowns… during the school day in Dance Studio. After the graduation ceremony, seniors must return caps and gowns before your actual diploma is issued. GRADUATION PRACTICE 1. Attendance at graduation practice is required. If you do not attend practice, you will not be allowed to participate in the graduation ceremony. Seniors will be notified of the date and time for graduation practice. Students will be required to sign a Letter of Notice form regarding their knowledge of the date and time of graduation practice and the consequences for not attending. 2. ALL school rules and policies will be in effect at practice. Do not jeopardize the opportunity to participate by making bad decisions which could cause you to be asked to leave practice. GRADUATION CEREMONY 1. Men are to wear white or light colored dress shirts, dark long pants (no shorts or jeans), ties, and dark dress shoes (no athletic shoes, sandals, flip-flops, etc.). 2. Ladies are to wear Sunday dresses that do not extend below the length of the graduation gown. (No shorts, jeans, or slacks will be permitted) Ladies must wear black shoes (no athletic shoes, flip-flops, etc.). 3. Caps and tassels are to be worn properly. Instructions will be given. 24
 
 



 


4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

Prior to walking onto the track, you will be checked for the proper dress. Any student not properly dressed will be pulled from the graduation line-up. NO GUM, PLEASE. All Brookhaven School District rules and regulations will be enforced on the night of graduation to include “possession, use, or being under the influence of controlled substances and/or alcohol.” Qualifying students may wear National Honor Society cords/stoles. Both items must be returned at the conclusion of the ceremony unless you wish to purchase them. School counselors will attend to the rental or purchase of cords and stoles at graduation practice. The only cords which will be worn are the gold or white cords for Special or Honor graduates and the NVTHS gray/silver cords. Mississippi Scholars may wear their medallions. Pictures at 5:00 P.M. All seniors will report to the auditorium on graduation day no later than 6:00 P.M. dressed in your cap and gown. THE ACTUAL DIPLOMA WILL BE GIVEN TO EACH SENIOR UPON THE RETURN OF THE CAP AND GOWN PROVIDED NO DISCIPLINE PROBLEM HAS OCCURRED DURING THE GRADUATION CEREMONY.

DROPPING A CLASS
Students are strongly encouraged not to drop a one (1) unit course after the first 15 days or a half (1/2) unit course after the first 10 days. Students are cautioned that dropping a class after this suggested timeline, may result in the student not meeting the required number of instructional hours to earn a full or half Carnegie unit towards graduation. Standard 19 of the Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards outlines this requirement.

GRADING
When numerical grades are used to assign letter grades, the following scale is used in grades seven through twelve: A -- Superior 90 – 100 B -- Above Average 80 – 89 C -- Average 70 – 79 D -- Passing 65 – 69 F -- Failure 64 and Below Exception – AP classes in grades nine through twelve, ELL Students, and Special Education Students. Midterm progress reports are required for all students. Parents are expected to sign and return the progress report to the child’s teacher to ensure knowledge of their child’s academic status. Report cards will be issued every nine weeks. Please see the school calendar for dates when students will be given progress reports and report cards. ALL course grades will be calculated as follows: Daily/Homework: 25% Tests: 25% Course Projects/Other: 25% 9 weeks/Semester Exam: 25% The nine week grade will be calculated by adding the 4 areas and dividing by 4. The semester grade will be calculated by adding the 1st and 2nd nine weeks and dividing by 2. The final grade will be calculated by adding the 1st and 2nd semesters and dividing by 2. 25
 
 



 


Semester exams will be given in lieu of nine weeks exams at the end of each semester. These exams will be cumulative on the objectives learned during that semester only and will count as 25% of the 2nd and 4th nine weeks grade respectively. Block courses and half-unit courses will use the same grading formula taking into account the differences in instructional times. Teachers do not have the authority to alter the above grading policy

PROMOTION/RETENTION
Student progression in grades seven and eight is based on the student’s achievement in terms of established instructional goals. Students may be retained in any of these grades for unsatisfactory academic performance. Classification of Students in Grades 9-12: Ninth Grade Promotion from Grade 8 Tenth Grade 6 Carnegie Units Eleventh Grade 13 Carnegie Units Twelfth Grade 19 Carnegie Units and be in line for May Graduation Beginning with the class of 2011, all students must complete at a minimum 27 credit in order to graduate from Brookhaven High School.

EXEMPTIONS AND EXAMS
Senior Privilege: Seniors who maintain a “B” average and meet the attendance requirement will be exempt from their final exams. In order for seniors to be exempt from any examination, he or she must not have been absent more than (10) ten days during the year for year-long courses. For block courses, students must not have been absent more than (5) five days during the semester. Both excused and unexcused absences are counted when calculating the number of days missed by a student. All term exams will determine 25% of the nine-week grade. In the case of exemptions the class average will be used as the nine-week grade. Any student (grades 9-12) absent from an examination must contact his subject teacher on the day he/she misses an examination AND receive permission to make-up the exam from the principal. If the student fails to contact the teacher and principal, the student will receive a zero for that examination.

HONOR ROLL
Students demonstrating outstanding work are listed on the Honor Roll as follows: 1. Honor Roll-All A’s 2. Honorable Mention-A’s and B’s Students with a grade of C or lower on their report cards will not be listed on the Honor Roll.

CREDIT RECOVERY
Students who are approved to take credit recovery courses must at a minimum meet the following requirements in addition to district policy requirements. • Must have made at least a 60 as final grade in the course. • Must have met all attendance policies for accumulating credit for a course. • For Government, must have completed the Presidential Profile. • For English IV, must have completed the Portfolio.

26
 
 



 


ONLINE AND CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
Only students that have completed their junior year may apply to take independent or online courses. Applications must be made through the counselor’s office and approved by the principal. Students will only be allowed to earn one credit via this method. The principal may make exception to this policy if the student is a senior in line to graduate, and is no more than a credit short of earning 27 units. Due to our Credit Recovery Program, Government cannot be taken online unless there is no room in the student’s schedule his/her senior year for Government. The last credit earned towards graduation cannot be through an online course.

TRANSCRIPTS AND OTHER EDUCATIONAL RECORDS
After graduation, one transcript is sent free of charge to a college or university as requested by the graduate. Thereafter, $1.00 for postage and materials is charged for each additional transcript. EDUCATIONAL RECORDS ARE FORWARDED BY THE GUIDANCE OFFICE UPON THE REQUEST OF THE SCHOOL IN WHICH A FORMER STUDENT SEEKS OR INTENDS TO ENROLL.

NATIONAL JUNIOR HONOR SOCIETY AND NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
Membership in the National Junior Honor Society and the National Honor Society is one of the highest honors than can be awarded to a junior high or high school student. It also carries an obligation to uphold the principles of the organization. The purpose of these organizations is to create enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote leadership, and to develop character in the students of Alexander Junior High School and Brookhaven High School. At BHS, selection for membership is by the Faculty Council and is open to those sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have attended Brookhaven High School for at least one semester and who demonstrate high standards of scholarship, leadership, service, and character. Once selected, member must maintain these high standards. At AJH, eighth graders are selected for membership based on the same ideals. Students must have a minimum cumulative (overall) numerical grade average of 90 (unrounded) and have no suspensions. Those students who have the 90 average, school and community involvement, and a clear discipline record will be notified and given a Student Activity Information Form on which they will outline their accomplishments in the areas of service and leadership. Faculty members will be given the opportunity to complete a student evaluation form on candidates. These forms will be sued to assist the Faculty Council in making decision regarding membership. The selection of each member shall be by majority vote of the Faculty Council. All current NHS members and inductees must not have accumulated more than 8 absences per semester in order to be inducted and/or maintain his/her membership in the National Honor Society. All absences will count toward the number allowed. At BHS, students shall be notified in writing of their selection. Students not selected will be notified by the chapter adviser. An induction ceremony will be held in March. Once inducted, the students must maintain the 90 average and a clear discipline record. Members will be required to participate in at least one service project a year and earn at least ten service hours a year. Student will be required to attend meetings. Students who fall below the standards will be notified in writing by the chapter adviser and given a semester-long period of probation to correct the deficiency. However, in cases of flagrant violation of school rules or civil laws the member does not have to be warned. A suspension will be considered a flagrant violation. For purposes of dismissal, a majority vote of the Faculty Council is required. 27
 
 



 


Yearly Dues are $10.00. At AJH, eighth grade students are invited to participate in the NJHS spring induction service in which they are honored and challenged to attain the organization’s ideals.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Advanced Placement classes will be weighted by five (5) points when figuring a student’s numerical grade point average. In order for a student to receive the weighted GPA, the student must also take the appropriate AP exam as provided through the College Board and provide documentation of same to the high school guidance office. Students must pass Advanced Placement courses with a grade of 60 or higher.

CLASS RANK
Student class rank will be determined by the numerical grade average---example 92.55. In addition, a category of “special honor graduates” will include students with the 95.00 or higher numerical average. Special honor graduates will wear a gold cord at graduation. Students with a 90.00-94.99 numerical average will be classified as “honor graduates”. Honor graduates will wear a white cord. All Carnegie unit courses taken towards the completion of a traditional high school diploma or a career pathway diploma will be considered in this average to include Computer Discovery, Transition to Algebra, and Algebra I at Alexander Junior High School.

VALEDICTORIAN/SALUTATORIAN
The Valedictorian of the graduation class will be the student who possesses the highest numerical grade average and ranking of all seniors on an unweighted scale at the conclusion of the 8th week of the 4th term of the senior year. The grades, including all Carnegie units over a five year (grades 8-12) period, will be included in the calculation. Advanced Placement classes will be weighted by five (5) points when figuring the totals. Should the numerical average be identical between more than one student, the ACT score will be the first tie-breaker. Should a second tie-breaker be needed, the number of Advanced Placement courses taken will be used. ONLY ONE STUDENT WILL BE SELECTED. The Salutatorian will be the student in the graduation class who possesses the second highest numerical grade average. All information pertaining to the Valedictorian will apply as well. ONLY ONE STUDENT WILL BE SELECTED.

TEXTBOOKS
Textbooks for students are furnished by the Brookhaven School District. As soon as classes have organized, free textbooks are assigned to all pupils. Parents are required to sign the book card assuming full responsibility for the books and their proper care until they have been returned to school. Pupils should see that their books are not abused, as a fine will be charged for any school owned book that shows unnecessary wear. All fines collected for damages or lost books will be used to replace or repair books owned by the Brookhaven School District. If a pupil loses a book and desires to pay for a lost book, arrangements must be made with the principal’s office in order to get another book. At any time during the school year, the staff may conduct a check on all textbooks. The fine and damage replacement schedule is as follows DAMAGE FINE Writing/drawing/scribbling in book $1.00 per page Excessive wear/damage, but Usable 10% cost of textbook Cover of book damaged 25% cost of textbook Spine damaged 25% cost of textbook Water damaged, but Usable 25% cost of textbook 28
 
 



 


Any damage which makes the textbook unusable for the following term will result in a fine equal to the cost of the textbook. Examples are water damage, missing pages, obscene or vulgar writing or drawing, profanity. A lost textbook will result in a fine equal to the cost of the textbook.

HOMEWORK
Homework study and other assignments to be accomplished at home will be given according to student needs as determined by the teacher. All homework assignments will be an outgrowth of objectives being studied in the classroom. Although we strongly recommend that parents aid pupils with their home assignments, we do not intend for these to be parent assignments.

PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES
Parent and teacher conferences are encouraged. However, it is necessary that all conferences are scheduled in advance. The parent should contact the teacher, a school administrator, or the school counselor for an appropriate time for both parties. All parents are encouraged to participate in the local parent/teacher organization

THREE TIER PROCESS
The 3-Tier Process, mandated by state policy, requires ongoing progress monitoring of all students to determine if students are making adequate growth based on the Mississippi Curriculum Benchmarks and/or competencies and objectives. If it is determined that a child is falling behind in any core skill, the child’s teacher must begin the process by establishing a written plan of intervention specific to that child’s needs, monitor that plan, and assess the child’s progress. The assessments must become a part of the child’s grade. This applies to all levels of tier intervention. (For example, if a child has not mastered a skill, fails an assignment and then is remediated at Tier 2, the success of the intervention should be entered and averaged with the initial grade.)

TECHNOLOGY
The Brookhaven School District is pleased to offer students access to computers and the internet to enhance academic development and skills in using media that are commonly found in all aspects of our daily lives. The district policy shall be that all computers with Internet access will be filtered in order to restrict the access of minors to harmful materials. The Brookhaven School District uses the filtering solution approved by the Mississippi Department of Education with an additional solution managed by the Brookhaven School District Technology Department. These filters shall meet all requirements outlined the Children’s Internet Protection Act. The Brookhaven School District will provide age-appropriate training for students who use the district Internet facilities. The training provided will be designed to promote the Brookhaven School District commitment to: I. II. The standards and acceptable use of Internet services as set forth in the Brookhaven School District Internet Safety Policy; Student safety with regard to: a. safety on the Internet; b. appropriate behavior while on online, on social networking Web sites, and in chat rooms; and c. cyberbullying awareness and response. Compliance with the requirements of the Children’s Internet Protection Act. 29
 
 


III.


 


Following receipt of this training, the student will acknowledge that he/she received the training, understood it, and will follow the provisions of the District's acceptable use policies. All use of electronic resources will be related to the curriculum. Access to computers will be given to students who agree (with parental signature) to act in a considerate and responsible manner. Appropriate parental permission forms will be sent home with each student. Students are responsible for good behavior on the school computers and will bear the responsibility if the agreement for appropriate usage is broken.

HOMEBOUND INSTRUCTION
Homebound instruction is available to students who have health impairments that adversely affect their school attendance. There are two types of home-based instruction. One type is available through the Special Education Department to students who have been identified as disabled. The second type is available through the classroom teacher. Parents of children with disabilities and who are in need of homebound instruction should contact the Director of Special Services at Brookhaven School District, PO Box 540, Brookhaven, MS 39601. The telephone number is 601-835-1211. Parents of children enrolled in regular education classes and who have temporary health problems due to illness, accident, surgery, or medical treatment should contact the school principal.

SPECIAL EDUCATION
The Brookhaven School District offers a variety of programs to meet the unique needs of each exceptional student. Special services are available for children between the ages of birth through twenty who are physically, mentally, communicatively and/or emotionally disabled. For information about the special education department, parents should contact the Director of Special Services. This office is located in the Mullins School at 711 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Brookhaven, MS 39601; the phone number is 601-835-1211.

PROGRESS REPORTS
Progress reports are sent to parents via the student near the middle of each nine-week grading period. Our objective in sending these reports is to keep the parents informed about the quality of the student’s work. If there is a question about a progress report, parents are encouraged to discuss the matter with the teacher.

REPORT CARDS
Report cards will be sent home to parents by the student four times during the school year. All students will receive their report cards the same day. Should a student fail to bring the report card home on time, please contact the principal or counselor immediately so that you may be furnished an additional one. The parent is asked to check the report card carefully. If there are failing grades, a conference is recommended with the parent and teacher. If the report card shows that the student has been absent or tardy more times than the parent knew, call the principal’s office to check on this area.

CHEATING
Cheating in any form will not be tolerated. Members of the National Honor Society will be referred to the Faculty Council for the possibility of dismissal from the organization.

30
 
 



 


BROOKHAVEN
TECHNICAL
CENTER

BTC SLOGAN 2012-2013 “Education Is The Passport To Your Future”

BTC MISSION STATEMENT       
To incorporate and implement the philosophy of the Brookhaven School District. To provide a safe and orderly environment. To be good stewards of our resources. To prepare every student enrolled in vocation-technical education for a life of work, learning and responsible citizenship. We will do our best to see that each student will become an effective member of society, capable and desirous of making a positive contribution to that society. To provide every student enrolled in a vocational-technical class the opportunity to develop to his highest capacity intellectually, socially, and morally, regardless of ability or status. To provide every student opportunities for critical thinking, problem solving, and practical application, to arouse curiosity and to stimulate further study. To continually evaluate, advise, and maintain the curriculum the technology available, and the instructional delivery strategies which will meet the changing needs of the student about to enter the workplace or a post secondary program of study.

NATIONAL TECHNICAL HONOR SOCIETY      
Be a second year technical student returning to the same program. Maintain a 93 or higher average for the two semesters of your 1 year in a BTC course. BTC instructor recommendation Be a member of a BTC sponsored student organization for at least one of your two years at the Brookhaven Technical Center. Must have a cumulative numerical GPA of 90 or higher by the end of your first year at BTC. Complete an application and pay dues. st

Senior members who complete the two-year course will wear the honor cord at graduation.

FEES
Career and Technical students are encouraged and expected to participate in their student organizations. Career and Technical student organizations are co-curricular rather than extra-curricular. That is, they are an integral part of the actual curriculum and participation is part of the student’s evaluation/grade. FBLA $10.00 (BTC students) SKILLS USA $12.00 (Construction Trades and Culinary Arts students) TSA $13.00 (Technology Application and Electronics students) HOSA $13.00 (Allied Health students) NTHS $20.00 (Members) FCCLA $10.00 (Culinary Arts students) These fees are subject to change as dictated by the Office of Career and Technical Education. 31
 
 



 


INSURANCE FOR STUDENTS
All students enrolled in a Career and Technical Education program must show proof of insurance. If the student cannot provide proof of insurance, then an insurance waiver must be signed in the office of the director or secretary in his/her presence. Failure to provide this information will result in the student’s removal from the Career and Technical Education program.

EXTRA
CURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES

FIELD TRIPS
The office shall have a signed statement from the parents or guardians of each student going on a trip away from the school grounds. This statement shall give the permission of the parents for the child to go on the trip and shall absolve the school of any responsibility regarding accidents which may occur to the student while on the trip. Coaches or sponsors are expected to be with the students, supervising them at all times and returning them in the same vehicle in which the student rode. Any student causing disciplinary problems while on a trip will be properly disciplined. Schoolwork missed during sponsored trips is to be made up by the student.

CLUBS
A variety of clubs are offered to meet the diverse needs of our student population. We encourage students to request other clubs based on their interests. The Sounds of Success, or SOS, is a special choral group comprised of students in both 7th and 8th grades that have auditioned to become members. The auditions are held in the Spring of each year at Lipsey Middle School for the incoming 7th graders and at Alexander for incoming 8th graders. This group performs at various functions, including assembly programs, local clubs and organizations, banquets, and competitions.

AJH SOUNDS OF SUCCESS

ELECTIONS
STUDENT COUNCIL/CLASS OFFICERS The Student Council serves as representatives for the student body. They seek to be the voice of the students. They represent the school in positions of leadership in assemblies, in touring visitors, and doing community service. The officers and representatives of the Student Council are elected by the student body. BHS Students wishing to run for a class office (president, vice-president, secretary, and treasurer) must follow the following criteria: o Have at least a 3.0 overall average for previous high school work during grades 9-12 as applies to the candidate. o Have no out of school suspensions and a maximum of one (1) in-school suspension. The prior semester’s discipline record will be included. o Candidates must have a petition with twenty-five (25) signatures of students from the candidate’s grade by the assigned deadline. Petitions may be picked up from the principal’s office. o After being elected, the student must maintain at least a 3.0 average overall for the present school year, as well as the discipline requirement listed in above. Criteria for officers: President: 3.0 GPA; no ISI/IHS; must be senior; must have previously served on Student Council Vice-President: 3.0 GPA; no ISI/IHS; must be either junior or senior; must have previously served on Student Council 32
 
 



 


Secretary: 3.0 GPA; no ISI/HIS; must be either sophomore, junior or senior; must have previously served on Student Council Treasurer: 3.0 GPA; no ISI/HIS; must be either sophomore, junior or senior; must have previously served on Student Council Representatives: 2.75 GPA; no ISI/HIS; 4 letters of recommendation; freshman, sophomore, junior or senior.

WHO’S WHO ELECTIONS AJH
Selection to Who’s Who at AJH is an honor. The following is the criteria for selection: • No student will be considered for any category if he or she has more than three ISS or any Out-ofSchool Suspensions. • Students will be eligible to receive only ONE category. • Voting will occur in early January of each year. • No student will be selected who has more than five (5) unexcused absences or ten (10) tardies. • No student will be selected who has an F on his or her report card.

BHS
BHS students will be nominated by a written ballot to run for a Who’s Who position. • All Who’s Who candidates will be nominated and elected from the graduating Senior Class with the exceptions of “Favorites” from the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior classes. • Students must have at least an overall G.P.A. of 2.5 for all previous high school work and at least a 2.5 for the current school year with no grade “F” in any subject for the current year. • The student can have no out-of-school suspensions and no more than one(1) in-school-isolation to be eligible. The prior semester’s discipline record will be included • A student may receive no more than two titles; and in the case he/she receives more than two, the student is given his/her choice. •

HOMECOMING COURT ELECTIONS

BHS students do not run for a position on the Homecoming Court. Nominations will take place by a written ballot. • In order to be placed on the ballot a students must receive at least 10% of the total number of nominations received. • The current school year and all of the prior school year will be used to determine if the students meets the discipline qualification to be placed on the court. • Students with more than 10 absences in the previous school year and/or more than 3 days absent in the current school year prior to nominations will not be allowed to participate on the court. • Students must be involved in at least 2 school and/or community activities to be placed on the court. Documentation of involvement must be presented to the principal prior to participation. • The student must have at least a 2.5 overall G.P.A. for all previous high school work and had no less than a 2.5 for the current school year or term. Current grades must not include “F” in any subject. • The BHS student’s discipline record must have no out-of-school suspensions and not more than one (1) in-school isolation. The prior semester’s discipline record will be included. In addition, a student may not serve on the court if she has an out-of-school suspension or more than one(1) in-school isolation between the elections and the date of Homecoming. • The Homecoming Court will be composed of the following BHS students: two (2) maids from grade 9, three (3) maids from grade 10; four (4) maids from grade 11; and five (5) maids will come from the senior class. The Homecoming Queen will be the student with the highest number of votes from 33
 
 



 




the senior maids. Voting for the class maids will be restricted to the students of that particular grade. Since the Queen is elected from the Senior Maids, only seniors will be allowed to vote for the Queen. This is considered a Senior Privilege. Escorts will be BHS students who are selected by the maids from their respective grades and approved by the principal. All escorts must meet the same grade, attendance, and discipline requirements as the maids.

ATHLETICS
The athletic program is extensive with opportunities for both males and females. The coaches are directly responsible for maintaining high qualities of performance and sportsmanship. Interested students should talk with a coach of a particular sport for more information. Grades, conduct, and attendance all play important roles in athletic success. All eligibility guidelines established by the Mississippi High School Athletic Association are enforced. At the discretion of the Athletic Director, a student who voluntarily quits a sport will not be allowed to participate in another athletic activity until the sporting season is completed for the sport in which the student quit. For example, if a player voluntarily quits football, he may not participate in basketball until the football season is over. CHEERLEADER SELECTION AND INFORMATION Cheerleader information is distributed and tryouts are held in the spring prior to the seasons during which they will serve. A team of judges rates their performances at a scheduled tryout and select the cheerleaders. The cheerleading coaches, with the approval of the principal and the superintendent, will set the rules for the squad. Cheerleaders are reminded that all MHSAA rules apply. ELIGIBILITY FOR ATHLETICS No student shall be eligible to participate in interscholastic athletics until a birth certificate has been presented to the Director of Activities. All rules stipulated by the MHSAA do apply. No student will be permitted to participate in inter-school contests for more than four years after entering high school—9th grade. A student shall not be permitted to participate who is not passing the required work—that is, if the student fails to complete the required number of Carnegie units with the appropriate average for the previous year, the student is not eligible. A student must attend school in the school district in which the parents are actual residents in order to be eligible to participate in inter-school contests, or spend one school year without participation before becoming eligible. No student may participate in practice or an event who has questionable attendance or conduct. STUDENT ATHLETE DRUG TESTING POLICY All students enrolled in varsity sports in the Brookhaven School District shall be subject to drug testing to the extent and manner provided for in School Board Policy JCDAC. Specific information will be provided to the parent or legal guardian and to the student and consent forms will be required. Additional information can be obtained by contacting the principal or the athletic director.

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DISCIPLINE/STUDENT
CODE
OF
CONDUCT

DISTRICT DISCIPLINE POLICIES
An organized disciplinary program supports teachers' efforts to teach and addresses the growth of positive student attitudes and behavior. The board has responsibility and authority to establish school rules and procedures for the purpose of maintaining a non-disruptive educational environment. The discipline policies of this District are in compliance with both federal and state law. The discipline policy incorporates the student code of conduct required by School Board Policy and as supplemented by all others adopted subsequent thereto. This school board affirms the role of community-based organizations in responding to the needs of students whose serious behavior problems in school places them at risk of becoming juvenile and adult offenders. Appropriate activities can help to reduce student delinquency and improve academic performance. Each school has adopted a specific set of strategies to promote and reward positive behavior from all students. Many of these strategies incorporate prizes, rewards, and community partnerships. A student code of conduct, developed under the leadership of the district administration, and in cooperation with staff, will be made available and distributed to parents and students outlining student conduct expectations and possible disciplinary actions, including consequences for disorderly conduct, as required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Students in violation of Board policy, administrative regulation and/or code of conduct provisions will be subject to discipline up to and including expulsion. Students may be denied participation in extracurricular activities. Titles and/or privileges available to or granted to students may also be denied and/or revoked (e.g., valedictorian, salutatorian, student body, class or club office positions, senior trip, prom, etc.). A referral to law enforcement may also be made. The code of conduct shall be based upon but not limited to the rules of student conduct and the rules of discipline and any and all related policies adopted subsequent hereto. The School Safety Act of 2001 provides a procedure for disciplining students whose behavior, as determined by the principal or designated administrator of each school, seriously interferes with the school environment as defined by the Act. The Superintendent is authorized to more fully develop and implement the following procedures in the school district. These provisions of the School Safety Act of 2001 are cumulative and in addition to existing school district discipline procedures.

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
The teacher is the authority is the classroom and, as such, is charged with classroom management. The administration will continue to support the teacher in decisions made in compliance with the written discipline code of conduct, school policies and procedures. • Teachers continue to have the authority to remove students from their classrooms under existing policies and statutes for certain behaviors and/or actions, and such behavior would not necessarily constitute "disruptive behavior" as defined in the School Safety Act of 2001 ("Act"). In accordance with the Act and the Attorney General opinion dated June 25, 2001, this District designates the building school administrator of each school to make the determination as to whether a student's behavior seriously interferes with the school 35
 
 



 


environment. Every removal from the classroom does not constitute an instance of "disruptive behavior" as defined by the Act.  "Disruptive Behavior" means conduct of a student that is so unruly, disruptive or abusive that it seriously interferes with a school teacher's or school administrator's ability to communicate with the students in a classroom, with a student's ability to learn, or with the operation of a school or a school-related activity, and which is not covered by other laws related to violence or possession of weapons or controlled substances on school property, school vehicles or at school-related activities. Such behaviors include, but are not limited to: foul, profane, obscene, threatening, defiant or abusive language or action toward teachers or other school employees; defiance, ridicule or verbal attack of a teacher; and willful, deliberate and overt acts of disobedience of the directions of a teacher.  "Habitually disruptive" refers to such actions of a student which cause disruption in a classroom, on school property or vehicles or at a school-related activity on more than two (2) occasions during a school year, and to disruptive behavior that was initiated, willful and overt on the part of the student and which required the attention of school personnel to deal with the disruption. • Should a student be removed from the classroom by a teacher because a teacher, in his or her professional judgment, has determined that the student is disrupting the learning environment under this Act, the teacher should describe the student's behavior in the information provided to the school administrator. If the school administrator disagrees with the teacher's decision to remove the student, the principal may return the student to the classroom. The teacher may request that the school administrator provide justification for returning the student to the classroom. A student does not have to be engaged in disruptive behavior as defined by Mississippi Code Annotated ' 37-11-54 (or the Act) to be removed from the classroom. A student may be removed from the classroom for other qualifying behavior under the school district's discipline plan. Should the school administrator determine that the student's conduct does rise to the level of "disruptive behavior" required in the Act or in accordance with existing procedures addressing the removal of the students from class, the parent/guardian will be contacted and a conference held with the parent/guardian by the most effective and/or efficient means available, including but not limited to, telephone, e-mail, written notice via mail or delivery. After the conference and application of the appropriate discipline under the school discipline plan, the student may return to class. After the second incident of disruptive behavior as determined by the school administrator, the school administrator, the student's parent or guardian and the reporting teacher or teachers shall develop a behavior modification plan. The conference to develop the plan may be held in person or via telephone. If the parent/guardian does not respond or refuses to participate, the teacher(s) and the school administrator shall prepare the plan and mail a copy to the parent/guardian. Once determination has been made by the school administrator that the student has not complied with the behavior modification plan, the school administrator shall follow the procedure for disciplining the student according to the student code of conduct and discipline plan, which may include placement at the alternative school for applicable offenses. The Act limits the expulsion 36
 
 









 


remedy to students age 13 and above. However, under board policy and other discipline procedures, expulsion may also apply to students under age 13. • If a student under age 13 has two instances of behavior that the school administrator classifies as "disruptive behavior," the District will appoint trained personnel to evaluate the child's behavior through an appropriate behavioral assessment. The assessment will not be one such that it is in conflict with federal laws requiring parental notification of certain types of evaluations. Any discipline, including expulsion, for "habitually disruptive" behavior under the Act, must follow existing procedures to ensure that the student is afforded his / her due process protections. (Section 37-11-55 (b)) The school district will more fully develop and implement procedures for devising behavior modification plans under the School Safety Act. It is this school district's policy to have procedures for dealing with a student who causes a disruption in the classroom, on school property or vehicles, or at school-related activities. These procedures will specifically address discipline measures for gang-related activity in the school, on school property or vehicles, or at school related activities.







CODE OF CONDUCT
The Brookhaven School District Board of Trustees has allowed each school in the District to adopt an assertive discipline plan to meet the needs of the individual school and its students. Those rights, privileges, requirements and prohibitions of each plan, when not in conflict with these policies, shall govern student behavior to the extent they are applicable. The following policies and procedures shall be applicable to student conduct District wide. 1. WEAPONS— 1. The following definitions apply to this section: (a) “Education property” shall mean any public or private school building or bus, public or private school campus, grounds, recreational area, athletic field, or other property owned, used or operated by any local school board, school, college or university board of trustees, or directors for the administration of any public or private educational institution or during a school related activity; provided however, that the term “educational property” shall not include any sixteenth section school land or lieu land on which is not located a school building, school campus, recreational area or athletic field. (b) “Student” shall mean a person enrolled in a public or private school, college or university, or a person who has been suspended or expelled within the last five (5) years from a public or private school, college or university, whether the person is an adult or a minor. (c) “Switchblade knife” shall mean a knife containing a blade or blades, which open automatically by the release of a spring or a similar contrivance. (d) “Weapon” shall mean any device enumerated in subsection (2) or (4) of this section. 2. It shall be a felony for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol or other firearm of any kind, or any dynamite cartridge, bomb, grenade, mine or powerful explosive on educational property. However, this subsection does not apply to a BB gun, air rifle or air pistol. Any person violating this subsection shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00), or committed to the custody of the State Department of Corrections for not more than three (3) years, or both. 37
 
 



 


3. It shall be a felony for any person to cause, encourage or aid a minor who is less than eighteen (18) years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol or other firearm of any kind, or any dynamite cartridge, bomb, grenade, mine or powerful explosive on educational property. However, this subsection does not apply to a BB gun, air rifle or air pistol. Any person violating this subsection shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00), or committed to the custody of the State Department of Corrections for not more than three (3) years, or both. 4. It shall be a misdemeanor for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any BB gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk, dagger, slingshot, leaded cane, switchblade knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razor and razor blades(except solely for personal use), and any sharppointed or edged instrument except instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used solely for preparation of food, instruction and maintenance on educational property. Any person violating this subsection shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00), or be imprisoned not exceeding six (6) months, or both. 5. It shall be a misdemeanor for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than eighteen (18) years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any BB gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk, dagger, slingshot, leaded cane, switchblade, knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razor blades (except solely for personal shaving) and any sharp pointed or edged instrument except instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used solely for preparation of food, instruction and maintenance on educational property. Any person violating this subsection shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00), or be imprisoned not exceeding six (6) months, or both. 6. It shall not be a violation of this section for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol or other firearm of any kind on educational property if: a. The person is not a student attending school on the educational property; b. The firearm is within a motor vehicle; and c. The person does not brandish, exhibit or display the firearm in any careless, angry or threatening manner. 7. This section shall not apply to: a. A weapon used solely for educational or school-sanctioned ceremonial purposes, or used in a school-approved program conducted under the supervision of an adult whose supervision has been approved by the school authority; b. Armed forces personnel of the United States, officers, and soldiers of the militia and National Guard, law enforcement personnel, any private police employed by an educational institution, State Militia or Emergency Management Corps and any guard or patrolman in a state or municipal institution, when acting in the discharge of their official duties; c. Home schools as defined in the compulsory school attendance law, Section 37-13-91, Mississippi Code of 1972; d. Competitors while participating in organized shooting events; e. Any person as authorized in Section 97-37-7 while in the performance of his official duties; f. Any mail carrier while in the performance of his official duties; or g. Any weapon not prescribed by Section 97-37-1 which is in a motor vehicle under the control of a parent, guardian, or custodian, as defined in Section 43-21-105, which is used to bring or pick up a student at a school building, school property or school function. 8. All schools shall post in public view a copy of the provisions of this section. 9. Also included in this policy is any pocketknife or other knife, taser, and any instrument having the effect or appearance of a weapon or that looks like a weapon, including utensils, imitation firearms, or knives, etc, etc.

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 Disciplinary Action The penalty for bringing a weapon on school property shall be expulsion from the school program and all of its activities for a minimum period of one calendar year. Any student who is charged with bringing a weapon on school property shall be automatically suspended for ten days and recommended for expulsion for a minimum period of one calendar year by the principal. The suspension shall take effect immediately following the provision of initial due process and pending the conclusion of due process on the recommendation of expulsion, all in accordance with Policies JDD, JDE and all others subsequently adopted by the Board. The Superintendent who receives a recommendation for expulsion may determine, based upon the particular circumstances of a given case, the period of time for such expulsion on a case-by-case basis. Readmission A student who is expelled for bringing a firearm or other weapon on school property must apply to the Board for readmission to the regular school program. Readmission may be granted by the Board upon a document showing that the student has participated in successful rehabilitation efforts, including, but not limited to, progress in the alternative school or similar program. Reporting Violations Violations of the firearms and weapons policy shall be reported in accordance with Brookhaven School District Policy JCBF/KP and KCBF-P/KP-P and applicable federal and state laws.

2. UNLAWFUL OR VIOLENT ACTS – The Brookhaven School District operates in compliance with The Prevention of School Violence Act, SB 3349 (1994) and its amendments and prohibits any unlawful or violent act on school property or during school related activities as set forth in School Board Policy. Reporting of Unlawful or Violent Acts—The Brookhaven School District in compliance with state statute has adopted policies that requires the reporting of certain unlawful and violent acts which have occurred on school property or during school related activities. 3. SEVERE DISRUPTIONS—Any misbehavior, misconduct or violation of any school rule or regulation will be dealt with using appropriate punishment. Certain types of misconduct may be considered as “cause” for disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion as outlined in the Discipline Plan or board policy and they apply if the act is committed on school property, at a school activity or function, on a school trip, or at a period of time that the student is under the control or responsibility of the school. 4. ZERO TOLERANCE—The Brookhaven School District will call for a mandatory recommendation

for expulsion from school for those students who commit any of the following acts, unless the recommendation is considered inappropriate for the circumstances of the act: 1. Violation of the District’s weapons policy 2. Violations of the following misconduct of the Board’s severe disruptions policy which include: ♦ Fighting ♦ Harassment, intimidation, or threats of violence against any student or any school personnel ♦ Possession, personal use or being under the influence of alcohol ♦ Possession, personal use or being under the influence of marijuana, illegal drugs, or any controlled substances, as defined by Mississippi State Law, not prescribed to the student

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♦ Attempting to sell or selling alcohol, marijuana, illegal drugs, over-the-counter medications, prescription drugs, tobacco products, tobacco or drug paraphernalia or any substance having the effect or appearance of a prohibited substance 3. Any offense punishable by the laws of the State of Mississippi that pertain to crimes against persons. (Mississippi Code Section 97-3-1 through 97-3-117); or 4. Violation of Mississippi code Section 97-37-21 which prohibits reporting that a bomb or other explosive has been, or is to be, placed or secreted in any public or private place, knowing that such report is false. Upon recommendation for expulsion, the School Board will conduct a due process hearing as provided by District Board Policy. (MS Code 97-3-1 through 97-3-117, 97-37-21).
 5. ATTENDANCE—The Brookhaven School District adheres to state law and mandates regarding attendance. 6. PERSONAL APPEARANCE/DRESS CODE—The Brookhaven School District expects students to observe minimal standards of hygiene, sanitation, and personal appearance as so set forth under school board policy.

1. All students are expected to observe certain minimal standards of hygiene, sanitation and personal appearance. Cleanliness of both dress and body is mandatory. 2. Articles of clothing must not be a health or safety hazard. 3. Student’s appearance must not be a distraction or interfere with the instructional program. 4. The following decorations, whether imprinted on the body or clothing are prohibited: - Symbols, mottos, words or acronyms that convey crude, vulgar, profane, violent, deathoriented, gang-related, sexually explicit or sexually suggestive messages. Symbols, mottos, words or acronyms advertising tobacco, alcohol, or illegal drug use or drug paraphernalia. - Symbols, mottos, words or acronyms identifying a student as a member of a secret or overtly anti-social group or gang or that identifies a student as a member of an organization that professes violence or hatred toward ones fellow man. * Visible and permanent tattoos/brands incompatible with the standard set forth herein shall be covered to prohibit their display. 5. Permitted clothing shall be worn as designed/manufactured to include the following: a. Suspender straps must be attached as designed and worn on shoulders. b. Shirt/Blouses must be buttoned. c. Zippers must be zipped. d. Belts must be fastened. 6. Approved garments must be of a length and fit that are suitable to the build and stature of the student. Excessively large or baggy clothes are prohibited. Similarly, excessively tight clothes are prohibited. HAIR: 1. Hair should be groomed so as not to extend to the eyebrows and cover or obscure the eyes or any part thereof. 2. Hair should be free from obnoxious odors, maintained clean in quality and neat in appearance. 3. Hair should not be groomed in class. HEAD COVERING/SUNGLASSES 1. Picks, curlers, rollers, bandanas, sweatbands or other similar head coverings or adornments shall not be worn to class or within school buildings.

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2. 3. Caps, hats, doo-rags, skullcaps, toboggans, visors, hoods or other similar head coverings shall not be worn on campus unless prescribed by a physician, previously approved by the School’s Administration for religious reasons, or approved by the School’s Administration for a special school activity. Sunglasses (unless indoor use is prescribed by a physician) shall not be worn to class or within school buildings.

ACCEPTABLE TOPS: 1. All tops must be size appropriate and should neither be overly baggy nor overly tight. 2. All tops must completely cover the abdomen, back, mid-drift, chest and cleavage at all times. This means full coverage while sitting, standing, bending or raising arms. 3. Undergarments must be covered at all times and shall not be seen through outer-garments. 4. Tops may not have holes or rips. 5. Tops shall not be longer than the fingertips of the wearer with the arm fully extended. 6. Tank tops, tube tops, halter tops, cut-off tops, fish net, see-through tops, spaghetti straps, strapless tops, or backless tops are prohibited. 7. Sports bras are an undergarment and are prohibited as an outer-garment. 8. Male students: No muscle shirts or jerseys are allowed without a shirt underneath. ACCEPTABLE BOTTOMS: 1. All bottoms such as pants, jeans, shorts, skorts or skirts must be securely fastened around the waist. 2. All shorts, skorts and skirts must be no shorter than 6 inches above the knee when sitting or the fingertips when the arm is fully extended while standing, whichever is longer. 3. Undergarments shall not be visible. 4. Outermost lower garment shall be worn at the waist and shall not extend below the heel of the shoe in length. Bottoms may not be so long as to drag the floor. 5. Tights or leggings worn as outer wear, spandex, bike shorts, bathing/swimming wear, sleep wear (including pajamas), are not permitted. 6. Bottoms may not have holes or rips on or above the knee. ACCEPTABLE SHOES 1. Shoes, boots or sandals should be worn at all times. 2. Neither house shoes nor shower shoes are permitted. UNACCEPTABLE DRESS 1. Trench coats are prohibited. 2. Hanging wallet chains, banging belt ends, spiked/studded belts, bracelets, chain belts, handcuffs, sharp heavy rings, removable decorations that cover teeth (“Grills”), and gloves are prohibited. 3. Visible body piercing, with the exception of earrings, is prohibited. Visible body piercing includes, but is not limited to, tongue rings and tongue studs. 4. Oversized style pant that would give the appearance of being baggy or saggy. 5. Any item of clothing that a student must hold in place to be compliant. SCHOOL SANCTIONED ATHLETIC WEAR 1. Students participating in school athletic events (including Cheerleaders and Band Members) are permitted to wear school team apparel on game day if permitted by their Coach or other Administrator responsible for that particular activity.

IN ALL INSTANCES, COMPLIANCE OR NON-COMPLIANCE WITH THIS DRESS CODE WILL BE DETERMINED BY THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. STUDENTS WHO DRESS IN A MANNER DETERMINED TO BE OUT OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE DRESS CODE WILL BE REQUIRED TO CALL A PARENT OR GUARDIAN TO BRING A CHANGE OF CLOTHES THAT CONFORMS WITH THE DRESS CODE. STUDENTS MAY NOT RETURN TO CLASS UNTIL THE PARENT OR GUIARDIAN ARRIVES.


7. TITLE IX—Students in the Brookhaven School District are protected from sexual discrimination, including sexual harassment, by Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 to the Civil Rights Act. It is the intent of the Board to maintain an environment free from sexual harassment of any kind. Therefore, unwelcomed sexual advances, request for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature amounting to or constituting harassment are prohibited by law and other verbal 41
 
 



 


physical conduct or a sexual nature amounting to or constituting harassment are prohibited by law and should be reported as provided by school board policy. Students are further protected from any such conduct outlined above through the Mississippi Educator Code of Ethics.

The district has a designated employee as the district compliance coordinator to handle inquiries and complaints regarding the non-discrimination policies of the above mentioned entities. This office is located in the Brookhaven School District Central Office 326 E. Court Street, Brookhaven, MS 39601. The phone number is 601-833-6661. 8. SCHOOL SEARCHES- The Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution and Article 3, Section 23 of the Mississippi Constitution provides all people with the right to secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches. However, circumstances will arise where searches of students’ persons, possessions, lockers, desks, and vehicles will be necessary. Administrators have the authority and obligation to exercise discretion in the implementation of this policy, balancing the District’s responsibility to maintain discipline, order, and a safe environment conducive to education with the students’ legitimate expectations of privacy. Searches are permitted under the guidelines and procedures of school board policy. 
 When a principal or his designee has probable cause or reasonable suspicion, that school official has a legal right and responsibility to search lockers, cell phones, desks, person, and/or vehicles for any item specifically prohibited by school board policy. A witness should be present during any search. It is not necessary to give prior warning for a locker search. The school official should seek cooperation from the student if a search is to be made of his/her person, requesting for instance, that the contents of pocket(s) or purses be placed on a table for inspection. 9. FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY- Information which could identify an

individual child will be maintained by the Brookhaven School District and will be provided to other agencies only in accord with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA), and IDEA. As a parent, you are guaranteed the right to inspect any such information about your child and to challenge its accuracy. Access to this information is forbidden to any unauthorized person without informed consent. Parents should address requests to review educational records to their school principal. An agency official will provide parents with explanations or interpretations of the educational records being reviewed. The agency may charge a fee for copies of educational records if the fee does not effectively prevent the parents from exercising their right to inspect and review those records. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents and students over 18 years of age ("eligible students") certain rights with respect to the student's education records. These rights are: 1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the School receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the School principal [or appropriate school official] a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The School official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. 42
 
 



 


2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the parent or eligible student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Parents or eligible students may ask the School to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the School principal [or appropriate official], clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the School decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the School will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without con-sent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the School as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the School Board; a person or company with whom the School has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. [Optional] Upon request, the School discloses education records without consent to officials of another school district in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the School to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901 10. PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY-Parent, legal guardians and custodians of each child shall be responsible financially for the students’ destructive acts against school property or persons as provided by Miss. Code Ann. Sec. 37-11-53 and 37-11-19 and District policy. 11. DRUG TESTING POLICY-All students enrolled in varsity sports in the Brookhaven School District shall be subject to drug testing to the extent and manner provided for in School Board Policy. Specific information will be provided to the parent or legal guardian and to the student and consent forms will be required. Additional information can be obtained by contacting the principal or the athletic director. 12. GANG ACTIVITY-The Brookhaven School District is committed to maintaining a safe school environment for its students and staff. In addition to applying the disciplinary policies of the District where gang activity is suspected a complaint will be filed in accordance with The Mississippi Street Gang Act (Miss. Code Sec. 97-44-1 et. Sec.).

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Gangs which initiate, advocate, or promote activities that threaten the safety or well-being of persons or property on school grounds or disrupt the school environment are harmful to the educational process. The use of hand signals, graffiti, or the presence of any apparel, jewelry, accessory, or manner of grooming which, by virtue of its color, arrangement, trademark, symbol, or any other attribute which indicates or implies membership or affiliation with such group, presents a clear and present danger and is prohibited. This is contrary to the school environment and educational objectives and creates an atmosphere where unlawful acts or violations of school regulations may occur. Incidents involving initiations, hazing, intimidations, and/or related activities of such group affiliations that are likely to cause bodily danger, physical harm, or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm to students are prohibited. 13. BUS CONDUCT-While the District is required to transport eligible students, each student must adhere to all established rules. The student Code of Conduct is comprehensive in that it covers all student misbehavior including buses. 14. VANDALISM-Willful destruction, damage, or injury to school property will not be tolerated and the student and the student’s parents will be subject to, in addition to state law, and District policy. 15. PARTICIPATION IN SCHOOL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES-Constitution of this state provides for a free appropriate education. The Brookhaven School District acknowledges this as a right of each student. Participation in school programs and activities are privileges as opposed to rights and governed by, in addition to state law, District policies and the student handbook. 16. STUDENT HANDBOOK-An explanation of other responsibilities and rights of students are set forth in the student handbook for each school in the District that is approved by the Board of Trustees on annual basis. These handbooks address, among other things, respect for persons and property, knowledge and observation of rules and conduct, free speech and student publications, assembly, privacy, and participation in programs and activities. 17. DISCIPLINE PLAN-Non-adherence to this code of conduct will result in the application of the District’s student discipline plan as well as any other applicable statute, regulation or policy. 18. BULLYING - Bullying or harassing behavior will not be condoned or tolerated when it takes place on school property, at any school-sponsored function, or on a school bus, or when it takes place off school property when such conduct, in the determination of the school superintendent or principal, renders the offending person’s presence in the classroom a disruption to the educational environment of the school or a detriment to the best interest and welfare of the pupils and teacher of such class as a whole. Bullying or harassing behavior is any pattern of gestures or written, electronic or verbal communications, or any physical act or any threatening communication, or any act reasonably perceived as being motivated by any actual or perceived differentiating characteristic that (a) places a student or school employee in actual and reasonable fear of harm to his or her person or damage to his or her property, or (b) creates or is certain to create a hostile environment by substantially interfering with or impairing a student's educational performance, opportunities or benefits. A "hostile environment" means that the victim subjectively views the conduct as bullying or harassing behavior and the conduct is objectively severe or pervasive enough that a reasonable person would agree that it is bullying or harassing behavior.

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The District recognizes the fundamental right of every student to take “reasonable actions” as may be necessary to defend himself or herself from an attack by another student who has evidenced menacing or threatening behavior through bullying or harassing. The Brookhaven School District defines “reasonable action” as promptly reporting the behavior to a teacher, principal, counselor, or other school employee when subjected to bullying or harassing behavior. Ref: SB 2015; Miss. Code Ann. § 37-7-301(e). Procedures for Processing a Complaint Concerning Bullying Any student, school employee or volunteer who feels he/she has been a victim of bullying or harassing behavior, or has witnessed or who has reliable information that a student, school employee or volunteer has been subject to bullying or harassing behavior shall report such conduct to a teacher, principal, counselor or other school official. The report shall be made promptly but no later than five (5) calendar days after the alleged act or acts occurred. The school official shall complete a Bullying/Harassing Behavior complaint which shall include the name of the reporting person, the specific nature and date of the misconduct, the names of the victim of the misconduct, the names of any witnesses and any other information that would assist in the investigation of the complaint. The report shall be given promptly to the principal or superintendent who shall institute an immediate investigation. Complaints against the principal shall be made to the superintendent and complaints against the superintendent shall be made to the Board chairman. The complaint shall be investigated promptly. Parents will be notified of the nature of any complaint involving their student. The District official will arrange such meetings as may be necessary with all concerned parties within five (5) working days after initial receipt of the complaint by the District. The parties will have an opportunity to submit evidence and a list of witnesses. All findings related to the complaint will be reduced to writing. The District official conducting the investigation shall notify the victim and parents as appropriate when the investigation is completed and a decision regarding disciplinary action, as warranted, is determined. If the victim is not satisfied with the decision of the District official, he/she may submit a written appeal to the superintendent. Such appeal shall be filed within ten (10) working days after receipt of the results of the initial decision. The superintendent will arrange such meetings with the victim and other affected parties as deemed necessary to discuss the appeal. The superintendent shall provide a written decision to the victim’s appeal within ten (10) working days. If the victim is not satisfied with the decision of the superintendent, a written appeal may be filed with the Board. Such appeal shall be filed within ten (10) working days after receipt of the decision of the superintendent. The Board shall, within twenty (20) working days, allow the victim and parents as appropriate to appear before the Board to present reasons for dissatisfaction with the decision of the superintendent. The Board shall provide a written decision within ten (10) working days following the victim’s appearance before the Board.

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DISCIPLINE PLAN
Administration of Discipline Each school is allowed to adopt an assertive discipline plan to meet the needs of the individual school and its students. These rights, privileges, requirements and prohibitions of each plan, when not in conflict with these policies, shall govern student behavior to the extent they are applicable. A. CORPORAL PUNISHMENT – Corporal punishment as a matter of policy may be administered in the District as a disciplinary measure as provided in Board Policy. Reasonable corporal punishment of a student is permitted in grades K-8 as a disciplinary measure in order to preserve an effective educational environment. Corporal punishment is permitted only by an administrator under the guidelines and procedures of School Board Policy, which also specifies the presence of a witness and a maximum of three strokes. B. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT –The teacher is the authority in the classroom and, as such, is charged with classroom managements as provided but he School Safety Act of 2001. The act, along with District policy, sets forth those rights, duties and responsibilities. C. SUSPENSION – When unacceptable behavior cannot be corrected by the resources of the teacher of the school administration, the District’s student suspension policy, shall apply. The Administrator reserves the right to determine if a student’s suspension may be served at the Alternative School. Students must bring their normal classroom materials of paper and pen or pencil. After completing their days of suspension (whether at home or at the Alternative School), the student must be accompanied by a parent for their first day back on school campus. D. EXPULSIONS – The right to a free appropriate education is a fundamental right; however, under certain circumstances the Brookhaven School District Board of Trustees has outlined policies and procedures for expulsion from the District. E. ALTERNTAIVE SCHOOL PROGRAM – An alternative school program has been implemented by the Brookhaven School District Board of Trustees as set forth by School Board Policy. F. DUE PROCESS – The policies and provision pertaining to students’ rights and due process regarding disciplinary matters is set forth in School Board Policy. G. PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY - Parents, legal guardians and custodians have certain responsibilities to their child and District. In addition to any statutory responsibilities or obligations imposed by other policies of the district, the following are incorporated into the District’s discipline plan: a. A parent, guardian or custodian of a compulsory-school-age child enrolled in a public school district shall be responsible financially for his or her minor child’s destructive acts against property or persons; b. A parent, guardian or custodian of a compulsory-school-age child enroll in a public school district may be requested to appear at school by the school attendance officer or an appropriate school official for a conference regarding acts of the child specified in paragraph (A) of this subsection, or for any other discipline conference regarding the acts of the child; c. A parent, guardian or custodian of a compulsory-school-age child enrolled in a public school district who refuses or willfully fails to attend such discipline conference specified in paragraph (B) of this section may be summoned by proper notification by the Superintendent of schools or the school attendance officer and be required to attend such discipline conference; and d. A parent, guardian or custodian of a compulsory-school-age child enrolled in a public school district shall be responsible for any criminal fines brought against such student for unlawful activity as defined in Section 37-11-29 occurring on school grounds. e. Any parent, guardian or custodian of a school age child who (a) fails to attend a discipline conference to which such parent, guardian or custodian has been summoned under the provisions of this section, or (b) refuses or willfully fails to perform any other duties imposed 46
 
 



 


upon him or her under the provision of this section, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction, shall be fined not to exceed Two Hundred Fifty Dollars ($250.00). f. Any public school district shall be entitled to recover damages in amount not to exceed Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000), plus necessary court costs, from the parents of any minor under the age of eighteen (18) years and over the age of six (6) years, who maliciously and willfully damages or destroys property belonging to such school district. However, this section shall not apply to parents whose parental control of such child has been removed by court order or decree. The action authorized in this section shall be in addition to all other actions which the school district is entitled to maintain and nothing in this section shall preclude recovery in a greater amount from the minor, or from a person, including the parents, for damages to which such minor or other person would otherwise be liable. H. PROCEDURES TO BE FOLLOWED – in addition to the procedures to be followed for acts requiring discipline as set out herein, the District shall follow Board policies JDD regarding Suspensions, JDE regarding Expulsions, and JDF regarding Due Process Procedures.

SCHOOL WIDE DISCIPLINE PLAN (7-12)
STUDENT CONDUCT/SEVERE DISRUPTIONS
Any misbehavior, misconduct or violation of any school rule or regulation will be dealt with using appropriate punishment. Certain types of misconduct may be considered as “cause” for disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion as outlined in the Assertive Discipline Plan or Board policies and they apply if the act is committed on school property, at a school activity or function, on a school trip, or at a period of time that the student is under the control of responsibility of the school. A. Any offence otherwise punishable by law and against the law of the State of Mississippi B. Fighting C. Harassment, intimidation or threats or violence against any student or any school personnel D. Disruption of normal school functions or operations, programs, or activities E. Disobedience to school personnel, including refusal to accept or follow instructions, disciplinary measures or counseling F. Disrespect to students or school personnel G. Profanity, insulting language, obscene language or gestures directed toward students or school personnel H. Unauthorized entry on school premises I. Unauthorized use of school property\ J. Vandalism, malicious mischief, damage to buildings, fixtures or personal property, including public and private property K. Possession, personal use or being under the influence of alcohol L. Possession, personal use or being under the influence of marijuana, illegal drugs, or any controlled substances, as designed by Mississippi State Law, not prescribed to the student or any substance having the effect or appearance of such substance or held out by the student to be such substance M. Possession or use of any tobacco product or paraphernalia N. Attempting to sell or selling alcohol, marijuana, illegal drugs, over-the-counter medications, prescriptions drugs, tobacco products, tobacco or drug paraphernalia or any substance having the effect or appearance of a prohibited substance proclaimed or professed by a student to be such substance O. Gambling of any nature or possession of gambling paraphernalia P. Truancy or cutting class 47
 
 



 


Q. Leaving school or leaving class without permission R. Cheating S. Public display of affection or sexual activity, including such activity in cars parked in the vicinity of school property T. Use of or possession of pornographic materials, stolen property, noise making devices, beepers or pagers, cellular phones, fireworks, other disruptive materials or look-alikes of such items U. Gang activity V. The privilege of obtaining a free and appropriate education is fundamental; however, along with this privilege comes certain responsibilities. One of these responsibilities is to respect the right to learn and to not disrupt the learning environment of the school. A student who repeatedly disregards the rights of others, violates school rules and/or repeatedly disrupts the learning environment will have to appear in a hearing before the School Board to face possible expulsion from school. Every effort, such as referral to a counselor, contacting parents, suspension, etc., will be made by school officials to avoid this School Board hearing, however it should also be noted that the Board of Trustees has indicated through their policies that a continued pattern of disruptive behavior will not be permitted. At each school positive behavior is encouraged from all students. Each school has a unique school wide positive behavior support system in place that acknowledges and rewards students for positive behavior. Some positive consequences for students include verbal praise, home notes, phone calls to parents, special privileges, and recognition to the principal.

ALEXANDER JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE PLAN
Classroom teachers will administer the Assertive Discipline Plan. Discipline does not imply punishment only, but rather the development of attitudes in persons that leads them to respect the necessity for regulations and the need to conform to them. At the junior high school level, students respect consistency and limitations. In an effort to improve general classroom climate, we are establishing the Assertive Discipline Model. The students must know the rules, the consequences for breaking them, and the rewards for keeping them. Classroom Rules 1. Follow directions the first time they are given. 2. Eating food and chewing gum is prohibited in class. 3. Come to class with all materials. 4. Be in your assigned seat ready to work when the bell rings. 5. Raise your hand and wait to be recognized before speaking. CONSEQUENCES FOR NEGATIVE BEHAVIOR: First Consequence – Verbal Warning and Name on Board Second Consequence – ONE CHECK………BREAK DETENTION Third Consequence – TWO CHECKS………CONTACT PARENT AND AFTER SCHOOL DETENTION

AJH AND BHS DISCIPLINE LADDER
When a student’s behavior is severe enough to be referred to the office, the student is automatically placed on the discipline ladder. A parent will be contacted upon each instance a child is referred to the office. The administrator will determine what constitutes a severe disruption and therefore warrants a student’s placement on the school’s discipline ladder. 48
 
 



 


DISCIPLINE-REFERRALS TO OFFICE (Assigned by an Administrator) When students are referred to the office, they will automatically be placed on the discipline ladder. Step 1: 1-2 days After School Detention, 5 school days probation Step 2: 3-4 days After School Detention, corporal punishment*, or 1-2 days In- School Suspension, 7 school days probation Step 3: 1 day Out-of-School Suspension or corporal punishment*, 7 school days probation Step 4: 3-5 days In-School Suspension, corporal punishment*, 2 days Out-of-School Suspension, or a combination, 15 school days probation Step 5: 3-5 days Out-of-School Suspension, 25 school days probation Participation in school activities for 5 days is denied with possible recommendation for Alternative School Education. Step 6: 6-9 days Out-of-School Suspension, 30 school days probation Participation in school activities for 10 days is denied with possible recommendation for Alternative School Education. Step 7: 10 days Out-of-School Suspension, 45 school days probation; OR expulsion Participation in school activities for 30 days is denied with possible recommendation for Alternative School Education.

*Notes: - Any parents who do not consent to their child receiving corporal punishment MUST sign the noncorporal punishment agreement. - Multiple referrals of ANY kind will result in placement on the discipline ladder. EXAMPLES
OF
SOME
ADMINISTRATIVE
ACTIONS
REGARDING
DISCIPLINE


Dress Code Violations Auditorium/cafeteria misconduct Repeated tardiness to school or class Unauthorized presence on school property Other behavior as designated by administrators Failure to report to detention for a teacher Open defiance of school personnel Failure to report to detention for an administrator Gambling Refusal to correctly identify one’s self to school personnel Misconduct at athletic events Bullying, intimidating, threatening, or harassing others Leaving campus, truancy, loitering Profanity or vulgarity, including gestures or writing Use of an electronic device Repeated violation of school rules Use or possession of tobacco products Defacing or destroying property (restitution) Fighting Gang affiliation Possession of dangerous objects Possession, use or attempted use of a weapon Use or possession of alcohol or drugs

Steps 1-4 Steps 1-5 Steps 1-6 Steps 1-7 Steps 1-7 Steps 2-3 Steps 2-7 Steps 2-5 Steps 2-5 Steps 2-6 Steps 2-7 Steps 3-7 Steps 3-6 Steps 3-7 Steps 4-6 Steps 4-7 Steps 5-6 Steps 5-6 Steps 5-7 (arrest) Steps 5-7 Steps 6-7 Step 7 (arrest) Step 7 (arrest)

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SCHOOL BUS REGULATIONS
The privilege of riding the bus carries with it a responsibility on the part of the student. Students who accept this responsibility are welcome to ride; those who do not may be denied this privilege. Bus drivers are expected to keep order and discipline on the bus, but their major responsibility is to drive the bus; therefore, students are to follow these regulations included in this section. Rules and Regulations of the State Board of Education Concerning Conduct Upon Public School Buses as Authorized by Chapter 15, Section 10, of the Extraordinary Session of 1953, and amended by House Bill 893 Laws of 1973: It shall be the duty of the passengers transported in school buses owned and operated or contracted by the public school districts to conduct themselves in an orderly manner. The passengers shall abide by rules and regulations of the State Board of Education and rules and regulations adopted by the boards for the respective school districts. LOADING AND UNLOADING 1. Be at your bus stop or assigned loading zone on time. 2. Exercise extreme caution in getting to and from your bus stop. 3. Look in both directions before stepping from behind parked cars and before crossing any roadway. 4. Stay out of the roadway until the bus comes to a complete stop and the bus driver indicates that it is safe to move to the bus. 5. Do not play on or near the road while waiting for the bus to arrive. 6. Always walk on the left side of the road facing on-coming traffic and step off the road when a motor vehicle approaches. 7. Use the hand rail while getting on and off the bus. 8. When you must cross the road or enter the bus, or after leaving the bus, always cross in front of the bus upon the signal of the driver. 9. Students who ride a bus to and from school are subject to school regulations of conduct. The school bus driver is empowered to enforce school regulations by reporting all student safety violations to the principal. If any pupil persists in disobeying any of the rules of good conduct, school officials may suspend or end free public transportation of the disobedient student. WHILE ON THE BUS • Students are to be courteous; follow the instructions of the bus driver. • Students should not distract the driver except in an emergency. • Students must identify themselves properly when requested to do so by the school bus personnel. • Students should speak in a conversational tone; no loud talking. • Students should remain seated on the bus at all times. • Students should keep their entire bodies and possessions inside bus. • Students should use the emergency door only in a true emergency. • Students must sit in seats assigned by the driver. • Students will be held financially responsible for any damage to the bus. • Students are not allowed to get off the bus before arriving at school. • Unauthorized articles are not allowed on the bus, (i.e., combustibles, large articles, pets, weapons, radios, toys, etc.). The following are prohibited: a. Profane Language; b. Smoking or tobacco products; c. Fighting or scuffling; d. Throwing objects within or from the bus. 50
 
 



 


Each passenger is expected to help in keeping the bus clean. Any student desiring to ride a different bus or to depart at a different stop shall present to the driver a note signed by his or her parent and approved by the school principal. Please note that approval to ride a different bus simply to go home with another student for an overnight stay or for a visit will not be granted due to the limited space available on buses. SCHOOL BUS DISCIPLINARY LADDER FOR SEVERE/PROHIBITED BEHAVIORS A student’s failure to conform to acceptable standards of behavior and courtesy while on a school bus will result in his/her being subject to disciplinary action. Should a student choose to break a rule, the following actions will be taken: 1. Warning issued to the student from the principal; parent contacted 2. Three (3) day bus suspension; parent/student conference required with the principal before student may ride the bus again. 3. Five (5) day bus suspension; parent/student conference required with the principal before the student may ride again. 4. Ten (10) day bus suspension; parent/student conference required with the principal before the student may again ride again. 5. Loss of bus privileges for the remainder of the school year. 6. A student may be placed at a higher level of the discipline ladder as deemed appropriate by the principal due to the student’s behavior. Consequences for minor behavior infractions (i.e. chewing gum, littering, etc.) shall be determined by the school administrator and may not result in placement on the discipline ladder.

ASSEMBLY PROGRAMS
Assembly programs are held in the gym or auditorium. These dates, locations, and times will be announced. Proper conduct is expected.

CORRIDORS
It is the desire of the Administration to permit an atmosphere of freedom in passing to and from classes and entering and exiting the buildings. The rules are simple, dictated by common sense and for the common good. Students are required to (1) walk by the nearest route, (2) keep to the right in the hallways and stairways, and (3) refrain from making any unnecessary noise. Students that violate this policy are subject to a 3 day out-of-school suspension.

CELL PHONES AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES
The use of cellular telephones by students is permitted before and after the official school day. All devices must be out of sight and turned off during the official school day and the lunch break. Students who violate this policy and the associated regulations shall be deemed to have created a disruption to the instructional environment and are subject to appropriate disciplinary action. No student shall photograph, videotape, record or reproduce, via any audio or video means, another student or staff member while on school system premises without the expressed prior permission of administration. Students shall be personally and solely responsible for the security of their cellular telephones and/or other electronic devices. The Brookhaven School District shall not assume responsibility or liability for the theft, loss or damage to a cellular telephone or other electronic device, nor does it assume responsibility for the unauthorized use of any device.

CARE OF MATERIALS AND SCHOOL FACILITIES
Students are expected to take care of all materials and facilities of the school. Students should not be guilty of carving on desks or tabletops, or putting feet on top of tables, chairs, or desks. Materials, equipment, instruments, and other school property should not be marred, misused, or abused at any time by students. 51
 
 



 



 
 
 


FANNIE
L.
MULLINS
ALTERNATIVE
SCHOOL


In the event that a student’s misbehavior warrants placement at the district alternative school, the following rules and regulations shall apply while enrolled there. DRESS CODE (Grades 4 – 12) A. BOY’S PANTS MUST BE WORN OVER THE HIPS WITH SHIRTS TUCKED IN. BELTS MUST BE WORN AT ALL TIMES. B. Students may not wear any type of hooded sweatshirt on their heads while on campus. C. Hair shall not be groomed in class. Hair shall be free from obnoxious odors, maintained clean in quality and neat in appearance. D. Hair shall not be in pin curls or rollers. E. No shower shoes or house shoes. F. All shirts/tops must have a sleeve. This includes dress and skirt tops also. G. No clothing may be worn with vulgar words, tobacco, gang signs, or alcohol advertisements, or any inappropriate slogans or pictures. H. Biker shorts, cutoffs, clothing with holes, or any style of clothing tending toward immodesty is prohibited. I. Sunglasses, all head covers (caps, hats, etc.), and trench coats are prohibited on campus. J. Midriffs shall not be exposed. K. Wind pants that may be seen through are prohibited. L. Tights are not to be worn as outer clothing even if covered by a long top. M. Piercing must be confined to the ears. N. Cleanliness of both dress and body is mandatory O. Dresses, skirts, and shorts must be at least to the tip of the longest finger in length. P. Extremes of any type will be considered inappropriate. Leaving Campus A student is considered to be in attendance at the Alternative School immediately upon entering the school’s campus. Students are to report to the cafeteria upon entering the campus. No student, whether transported on public or private conveyances, may leave the school campus without first obtaining written permission from the school officials and must be accompanied by parent, guardian or designated other. Failure to comply with the above policy will result in disciplinary action. Checking In/Checking Out of School Students enrolled in the Alternative Education Program are to be checked in and out by the parent, guardian or other designated adult. Identification of the individual checking the student in or out will be required, therefore only adults will be listed on a student’s check in/check-out form. Other students enrolled in the Brookhaven School District will not be permitted to check students in or out. No individual under twenty-one years of age will be permitted to check students in or out. 1. No student shall leave school without permission from the school official and must be accompanied by a parent, guardian or designated other. 2. Students will be allowed to check out of school for personal illness, or an emergency. Students must secure written permission from school officials and be signed out by the student’s parent, 52
 
 



 


guardian or designated other before they will be allowed to leave school. No student will be allowed to leave with anyone other than his parent, guardian or designated other. 3. Upon returning to school the next day the parent, guardian, or designated other must accompany the student to the office to sign in the student. The student will not be allowed to sign in without the parent, guardian or designated other. 4. Students will be assigned one hour additional time in the alternative school sign in late or checking out prior to the end of the school day. Tardies Students checking in after 9:15 A.M. must be checked in by parent, guardian or designated other. All students who check in late will be considered tardy. Three (3) tardies will constitute an extra day in the Alternative School. Students who are tardy will be permitted to ride the bus in the afternoon. Early Arrival at School Students should not arrive on campus prior to 8:45 A. M. Students are to report to the cafeteria to assemble with their first period teacher. All classes will begin promptly at 9:00 A. M. Use of Office Telephone The Alternative School telephone number is (601) 833-7472. Students will not be permitted to use the office telephone except for emergency situations. All calls regarding students concerns will be made by the principal or his/her designee. Counseling Counseling will be provided by the counselor from the referring school. The alternative principal will schedule appropriate times for counseling with the referring school counselor. Extra Curricular Activities Students in the Alternative School may not participate in or attend any other school activities while enrolled in the Alternative School (no football, softball, and baseball, or basketball games, track). Failure to comply with this policy will result in disciplinary action or lengthen the number of days assigned to the Alternative School. 


DISCRIMINATION/COMPLIANCE

FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federal law, requires that Brookhaven School District, with certain exceptions, obtain your written consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable information from your child's education records. However, Brookhaven School District may disclose appropriately designated "directory information" without written consent, unless you have advised the District to the contrary in accordance with District procedures. The primary purpose of directory information is to allow the District to include this type of information from your child's education records in certain school publications. Examples include: • A playbill, showing your student's role in a drama production; • The annual yearbook; • Honor roll or other recognition lists; • Graduation programs; and • Sports activity sheets, such as for wrestling, showing weight and height of team members. Directory information, which is information that is generally not considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released, can also be disclosed to outside organizations without a parent's prior written consent. Outside organizations include, but are not limited to, companies that manufacture class rings or publish 53
 
 



 


yearbooks. In addition, two federal laws require districts receiving assistance under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to provide military recruiters, upon request, with three directory information categories - names, addresses and telephone listings - unless parents have advised the LEA that they do not want their student's information disclosed without their prior written consent. If you do not want the Brookhaven School District to disclose directory information from your child's education records without your prior written consent, you must notify the District in writing within seven days after enrolling/registering for school. The Brookhaven School District has designated the following information as directory information: • Student’s name • Participation in officially recognized activities and sports • Address • Telephone listing • Weight and height of members of athletic teams • Electronic mail address • Photograph • Degrees, honors, and awards received • Date and place of birth • Major field of study • Dates of attendance • Grade level • The most recent educational agency or institution attended •

CHILD FIND
The Brookhaven School District is participating in an ongoing statewide effort to identify, locate and evaluate children ages birth through the age of 21 who are physically, mentally, communicatively, and/or emotionally disabled. Child Find Director is also the Director of Special Services. Child Find implements child identification, location, and evaluation of children ages birth through 21 who are disabled, regardless of the severity of their disabilities, and are in need of special education and related services. If you know a child who needs special services, please contact the Child Find Coordinator at Brookhaven School District, P. O. Box 540, Brookhaven, MS 39602-0540, or you may call 601-835-1211.

SECTION 504/ AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT
To ensure compliance with Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, the School District has appointed a Section 504/ADA Coordinator. No qualified person with disabilities, shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, nor otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity which receives or benefits from federal financial assistance. In determining the site or location of a facility or classroom, selections will not be made that have the effect of excluding disabled person. The School District does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its programs and activities. If you or your child needs further information concerning Section 504 services or ADA, please contact the Central Office at 601-833-6661.

FINANCIAL HARDSHIP/ FEE POLICY
This school board hereby authorizes the superintendent to charge reasonable fees, but not more than the actual cost, for the following: 1. Supplemental instructional materials and supplies, excluding textbooks; 54
 
 



 


2. Other fees designated by the superintendent as fees related to a valid curriculum educational objective, including transportation; and 3. Extracurricular activities and any other educational activities of the school district which are not designated by the superintendent as valid curriculum educational objectives, such as band trips and athletic events. Fee waiver applications are available for students whose parents who the income eligibility requirement. These application are available in the district’s Child Nutrition Office located inside of Mullins School.

TITLE I PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
The Brookhaven School District shall be in full compliance with the regulations of the U. S. Department of Education under current Title I regulations relating to parent involvement and participation. The District shall provide opportunities for parents of children being served by Title I for participation in the design and implementation of the Title I project, including the development of the instructional plan and school improvement. Encouragement of parent participation and involvement shall also include, but not be limited to, the provision of timely information about program plans and evaluation, the solicitation of suggestions for operation of the program, consultation with parents, informing parents of their children’s needs and of program objectives, and an annual public meeting for parents and school personnel. Developed jointly with parents of participating children served by the Title I program, the parent involvement policy for the Brookhaven School District includes the following: A. Parents shall be involved in the joint development of the District plan under pertinent sections of the Title I laws and regulations and in the process of school and review improvement as required under state and federal rules; B. Coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist participating schools in planning and implementing effective parent involvement shall be provided; C. In an effort to improve student achievement and maintain strong community partnerships the Brookhaven School District 1. Shall help parents to understand the National Education goals, state content and performance standards, state and local assessments, Title I requirements, how to monitor progress while participating in their children’s education and how to work with educators toward children’s improved performance; 2. Shall provide materials and facilities to train parents, teachers, pupil services personnel, principals, and staff to work with each other and work with parents as equal partners; 3. Shall educate teachers, pupil services personnel, principals, and staff with assistance from parents on how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners; 4. Shall coordinate and integrate Title I parental involvement strategies with 55
 
 



 


parent involvement strategies under other programs such as Head Start, Parents as Teachers, and public preschool programs, etc.; 5. Shall develop appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses while encouraging partnerships between elementary, middle, and secondary schools; 6. Shall conduct other activities, as appropriate and feasible, such as parent resource center and opportunities for parents to learn about child development and rearing from birth of child, designed to help parents become full partners in the education of their children; 7. Shall ensure, to the extent possible, that information sent home is in language and form parents can understand; 8. Shall provide such other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under this section as parents may request. D. An annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parental involvement policy of the District shall be conducted to determine the effectiveness of the policy in increasing parental participation and identifying barriers to greater participation by parents in activities authorized under Title I regulations, findings shall be used to design strategies for school improvement in this area. E. No less than (1) percent of the local allocation shall be used to carry out this mandate regarding parent involvement, including family literacy and parenting skills. F. Parents of children receiving services shall be involved in the decisions as to how funds reserved as noted in “E” above shall be utilized for parent involvement activities. G. Parent-teacher conferences relating to an individual student, frequent progress reports, and reasonable access to staff for volunteer activities and observations of their children’s classroom shall be provided. H. Other requirements of the Title I parent involvement policy outlined in federal guidelines shall be met by the local District. I. This written policy shall be distributed to parents of participating students, together with distribution to staff members. J. Brookhaven School District will provide full opportunities for participation for parents who are disabled or who have limited English proficiency, including providing information and school profiles in a language and format appropriate to the parents’ communication needs

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND AND THE "RIGHT TO KNOW"
In January of 2002, President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind legislation. This piece of legislation makes several changes in education. One of the new requirements of this legislation is the notification of all parents of their “right to know” the qualifications of the teachers and teacher assistants who work with their children. 56
 
 



 


Brookhaven School District is committed to providing highly qualified staff for every student, and if your child will be taught by someone that does not meet the federal definition of “highly qualified” for four or more consecutive weeks, you will be notified in writing. If you have any questions, you may contact your child’s principal or you may contact the central office.

HOMELESS
When a child is determined to be homeless as defined by the Steward B. McKinney Act 42 USC Section 1143(1), 11432(e)(4) and 11302(a), the Brookhaven School District shall consider and take enrollment action that is in the best interest of the child, pursuant to 42 USC II 432(e)(3). • • The requirements of Section II above are minimum requirements, and the Brookhaven School District may require additional documentation and verification at any time. At the minimum, the Brookhaven School District shall maintain in a file a written instrument identifying the types of documents used to verify each student’s residency and copies of any relevant guardianship petition or decree. The provisions of this policy do not apply to students who reside outside the Brookhaven School District but who have legally transferred into the District. Any court-ordered procedure shall take precedent over any procedure contained herein.





ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELL) SERVICES
The Brookhaven School District provides services to English Language Learners. For information regarding this program, contact the Director of Federal Programs at 601-833-6661.

OTHER

SCHOOL AND CLASSROOM VISITS
Parents are always welcome to visit their child’s class and get acquainted with the teacher. As a courtesy to the teacher, it is suggested that an appointment be made for all visits. Classroom visitations are not a time for parent / teacher conferences. It should be used an opportunity to observe your child in his/her educational setting. Contacting the teacher, principal, or assistant principal by note or telephone in advance is recommended. All visitors must always report directly to the office and obtain a pass if they are in the building for classroom visitation or reporting as a volunteer.

DELIVERIES
NO balloons, flowers, etc., should be delivered to the school. The school does not accept deliveries of food (pizza, hamburgers, etc.) during normal school hours. Parents are asked not to bring lunches to students. Students are to bring their lunch to school with them or eat in the cafeteria.

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USE OF OFFICE TELEPHONE
Students will not be allowed to use the office telephone. Only emergency calls will be made by office personnel for the student. A properly completed PHONE PASS will be completed by the student and given to the teacher.

PARENT & BUS PICK-UP, STUDENTS WALKING HOME
All students are to leave campus from the area designated for parent pick-up, bus pick-up, or students walking home. Students walking home must leave from the designated area may not get into any vehicles on the way home. Parent pick-up will only be allowed in the designated area. Students may not walk to another area to be picked up other than the designated parent pick-up area. Students riding a bus will go to the designated bus pick-up.

STUDENT PARKING
Student are allowed to drive to BHS. Bringing a vehicle to schools is a privilege not a right. Students should park in the following locations: parking lot on East Monticello Street and marked spaced around the campus designated for student parking. In order to maximize space, vehicles should be parked within the marked lines. If a student chooses to park in an unauthorized space, the student will be required to move their vehicle and will be assigned detention. Once students arrive at school, students are to come inside the building. Parking in the vocational parking lot is a privilege for students who are currently enrolled in a BTC class, failure to cooperate with these regulations will result in a loss of the privilege. ALL VEHICLES MUST BE PROPERLY REGISTERED.

SOLICITING
Students will not be permitted to sell candy or other cash items at school for the purpose of raising money for the school activity fund. An exception to this would be fundraising projects by the PTA, Booster Club, or other outside groups. Proper approval is required for these activities.

DAILY CHANGES IN TRANSPORTATION
The student should bring a note to school to let the teacher know if he/she is to be a parent pick-up or if he/she is to ride in a different mode than the documented source of transportation. The Director of Transportation’s telephone number is 835-1806.

PARENT PICK-UP
Students who ride in cars must be dropped off or picked up on the appropriate side of the school. Parents are asked to wait in their cars forming an orderly line. Adults on supervisory duty will assist students loading and unloading.

VALUABLES
Students should not bring large sums of money or items of value to school. Radios, Walkmans, hand-held games, etc., are not permitted. The only time students are permitted to bring a toy or game to school is at the direct request of the teacher. The school will not take responsibility for lost items.

ROLE OF P.T.A.
The mission of the Parent-Teacher Association is to strengthen the bond between the school and the home. The mission is accomplished by helping the parents to become involved in the activities and decisions of the school and the educational experiences of their children. We invite and urge all parents to join the P.T.A. and to participate in all projects, workshops, and meetings 58
 
 



 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


FOCUS

 BOOK

 2012‐2013

The information in the Focus Book is compiled to assist students and parents with the selection of courses through high school and to assist in preparation for college or the world of work. When planning a program of study, students must consider individual strengths, abilities and interests. In order to make appropriate subject choices, students should consider career goals. BHS GUIDANCE COUNSELORS

Stephaniesa Butler Felicia Durr Tracy Risher


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YEAR
BY
YEAR…

9th Grade
• By ninth grade, you should have developed a 4-year plan that will help you decide how to use your in school and after school-hours most effectively. Review your 4-year plan with your high school counselor and parents, a group conference is an ideal way to plan for the future. Consider short and long term educational goals. The more selective colleges will check to see whether or not your courses represent the most challenging program offered by your high school. Think about the following: o What courses are required for graduation? o What courses are required for college admission? o Challenge yourself with appropriate AP classes. o You begin compiling a cumulative GPA (grade point average) this year. Do your best. o Look into summer academic programs or jobs that might be of interest. o Participate in one or more extracurricular activities at school or in the community. Share your talents with others by volunteering. Get involved. Consider taking a career interest inventory available through the Tech Prep Center. Get to know the people who work there and the resources available. Read widely. Exposure to different kinds of material will improve your vocabulary and language skills Create a school file to keep copies or report cards, and any other materials that document your successes. Before registering for next year, evaluate your academic program – grades received and courses that you have taken or will take. Are you still on track for meeting your goals? Have your goals changed? If so, rethink your academic program.

• • • •

10th Grade
• • Take the PLAN, the pre-ACT test. Use your test results to identify areas of weakness. Concentrate on strengthening these areas before taking the ACT next year. The PSAT is given in October. Be sure to sign up. When you are in 11th grade, your PSAT scores are used for the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. Scores don’t count this year – just take the PSAT for practice. Take SAT-II: Subject Tests at the end of 10th grade in any subjects in which you have done well but do not plan to continue studying in high school. You may take only 3 tests per semester. Check to see if these tests are required by the colleges you are exploring. Evaluate your time-management skills. Make sure that you have a balance between school, work, and play. Maintain good attendance, grades, and citizenship Plan a meaningful summer activity. Consider an internship, volunteer work, travel or spending time with someone who works in a career that interests you. Get more involved in your favorite extracurricular activity. Colleges look for depth of involvement. Continue reading widely. Maintain your school file. If you work, begin a savings account for college. Re-evaluate your course selection and academic progress.



• • • • • • • •

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11th Grade
Students: Discuss college plans with your parents and counselor. Parents: Make an appointment to discuss college planning with your son’s or daughter’s counselor. Family discussions with a student’s counselor early in the year help clarify everyone’s expectations. • If available, sign up for an ACT/SAT workshop. Remember the cost of a workshop may not reflect its quality. Try to find one in which the instructor will analyze your answer sheet; provide you with specific information on your strengths and weaknesses and offer tips and hints on how to raise your scores. • Take the PSAT (Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test). This test, and other criteria, could qualify you as a National Merit or Achievement Scholar – and that translates into scholarships. • Meet with your guidance counselor to review your courses for this year, plan for senior year, and discuss colleges you would like to explore. • Maintain your school file or college planning portfolio. • Attend college fairs, write or call colleges you are interested in and begin reviewing their literature and websites. Speak with college representatives when they visit your school. • Prepare for and take the ACT and/or SAT. • Take SAT-II: Subject Tests in subjects you will complete at the end of this school year or in courses such as foreign language, even if you plan to continue. • If you are taking Advanced Placement (AP) courses and doing extremely well, consider taking AP tests. Choose carefully. A fee is charged for each test, and studying for AP tests takes a lot of time. Be sure you know what you hope to gain from taking each test. Some colleges offer exemption, credit, or both for AP Grades of 3, 4, or 5. If you take AP tests, be sure your grades are reported to your high school and sent to the college of your choice. • Maintain good attendance, grades, citizenship, and commitment to extracurricular activities and/or job. • Begin thinking about which teacher and others you might ask to write recommendation in the fall of your senior year. • Use your spring and summer breaks to visit college campuses. Make sure that the colleges you want to visit will be in session and call ahead for an appointment if you want an interview with an admissions officer or faculty member. • Look into summer jobs or academic programs. Be sure to ask for letters of recommendation from your supervisor, camp director, formal or informal mentor, or others before you complete your summer activity. Do not wait until winter. You want these people to write when they remember you best. Ask that the letters be addressed to “To Whom It May Concern,” and give the letters to your senior counselor as soon as possible. Keep copies. • Send away for catalogs, applications and scholarship forms for the colleges you are exploring. • Work up a cost comparison chart for all colleges you may want to attend. (Other factors you will want to considered are size, geographic location, course offerings, extracurricular activities, facultystudent ratio, special programs (study abroad), academic advising and career counseling procedures, curriculum and course requirements for specific majors, and who teaches freshman courses (professors or graduate assistants).

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Senior Calendar
All 18 year old men (including U.S. citizens living abroad and non-citizen immigrant males 18-25 residing in the U.S.) must register with Selective Service. You may register with Selective Service online at www.sss.gov. August- October • Continue to work hard on your studies. Colleges care about your course work and grades throughout your entire senior year. • Visit fastweb. com for free scholarship search. • Take the ACT or SAT in the fall to improve your scores. Make sure that your ACT or SAT scores are sent to your high school guidance office and the college to which you are applying. • Narrow the list of colleges you might want to attend. Write college admissions offices for information. You may choose to visit college websites and download information. • Carefully study the college publications when they arrive. • Note the following for each college you are considering: Application deadline Financial aid deadline Tests required Cost Number and types of recommendations required Interview deadlines and locations (Not required for all colleges) • Attend high school college fair. November-December • Mail admissions applications to your top choice schools. • Pay attention to deadlines. It is your responsibility to ensure that applications and supporting materials reach the colleges on time. • Research and apply for scholarships. • Parents should start collecting information for financial aid forms. January-March • Complete Federal Financial Aid Forms. These forms are available from your guidance counselor. Mail FAFSA forms as soon as possible after January 1 or file online. • Contact your guidance counselor about MTAG. • Watch for important deadlines at you chosen college (housing, financial aid, auditions, tryouts, etc. April • Students interested in applying for Guaranteed Student Loans should check with the Financial Aid Office of the college of their choice for appropriate GSL paper. • Check with the college you have chosen to attend about the details of signing and returning financial aid award letters. • Watch your mail for admissions letters. Be sure to return promptly any other forms, such as housing agreements. • Watch the mail for information from the college of your choice on freshman orientation, summer academic programs, and other information that will help your transition to college. May-June If you are still undecided, visit again the colleges and universities you are considering. Consider all the factors – cost, financial assistance and the quality of academic programs, and then decide which college or university is right for you. 

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SENIOR
EARLY
DISMISSAL
POLICY





Beginning with the class of 2011, all students must complete at a minimum 27 credits A senior may take early dismissal at the end of 3rd period if he/she meets all of the following criteria: • completed 24 Carnegie units • passed all required State Tests • has a good discipline and attendance record • has signed permission from parent or guardian • • • All seniors approved for Early Dismissal must leave the campus immediately because the school is no longer legally responsible for the student. Seniors are reminded that this is a privilege that can be taken away. Consult the handbook for additional information. Seniors cannot take morning courses then leave campus and return for afternoon courses. Early Dismissal forms are available in the Guidance Office.

GRADE
CLASSIFICATIONS

Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Promotion from the 8th grade 6 Credits 13 Credits 19 Credits and be in line for May Graduation Independent Study and Online Policy Only students that have completed their junior year may apply to take independent or online courses. Applications must be made through the counselor’s office and approved by the principal. Students will only be allowed to earn one credit via this method. The principal may make exception to this policy if the student is a senior in line to graduate, and is no more than a credit short of earning 27 units. Due to our Credit Recovery Program, Government cannot be taken online unless there is no room in the student’s schedule his/her senior year for Government.

BROOKHAVEN
HIGH
SCHOOL
COURSE
LISTINGS
 AND
DESCRIPTIONS
 THE ARTS
VISUAL ARTS I: Art I introduces the basic academic principles of drawing and design. Students complete two and three dimensional work which is built upon the basic academic art principles. Art appreciation and some career awareness are introduced. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit

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VISUAL ARTS II: Art II builds upon and enlarges the foundation of academic principles of Art I. Students complete work in a variety of media which strengthens their artistic and creative skills. Studies are completed in art history, career awareness, various drawing media, printmaking and sculpture processes. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Art I VISUAL ARTS III: Art III seeks to prepare the young artist for more serious art disciplines. Students assemble their portfolios for college, and they complete in-depth work in two and three dimensional processes. More emphasis is placed upon developing individual creativity and style; more emphasis is placed upon the role of the artist in society. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Art II VISUAL ARTS IV: Art IV builds upon all the foundations laid in previous art courses. Students in Art IV develop more creativity and self-sufficiency as they work more independently. Extensive art history is covered; projects are completed which could be marketed. The portfolio is strengthened by quantity and quality. Grade: 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Art III BAND: The Brookhaven High School Band is a top quality organization of which the benefits of membership far outweigh the demands. Some of the activities include: marching band performances; trips to ball games and contests; performing with the concert and symphonic bands and jazz band (both pop and classical music), technique development, sectional rehearsals, and other rehearsals to prepare for performances. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit THEATRE I: This course is an introduction to the world of the theater. The student will learn the beginning of the art form and the men and women who created memorable moments on stage. Students will develop appropriate personal speech habits and have an opportunity to be a part of a dramatic performance. The student will develop a relationship with self and the elusive audience. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit THEATRE II: This course is a very extensive study of play production and what happens behind the scenes. The student will have a working knowledge of play structure from the choice of the play to performance. The students will be required to audition for and participate in whatever production is presented during this course. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Theatre I

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MUSIC: CHORAL: The Brookhaven High School Choral Music Program will include an ensemble class for all high school students and a women’s choir which is a vocal performing group. Students will be chosen by audition and recommendation. Students will be expected to perform for the high school, community organizations, festivals around the state, and winter and spring concerts. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 or 2 units MUSIC: GENERAL: This class is open to all students at BHS. This course included intense studies of music theory, music reading, and recorder playing; the orchestra and its instruments; music and its importance in religion; and music history from 450-today. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit

BUSINESS EDUCATION
ACCOUNTING I: The purpose of this course is to give the student knowledge of the importance of accurate recordkeeping and the preparation of financial statements. Emphasis is also placed on following instructions, doing independent thinking, and being accurate in computations. The first nine weeks of the term are devoted to working exercises in order to familiarize the student with the accounting cycle. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit ACCOUNTING II: Accounting II contains more complex, detailed financial problems using advanced accounting principles. Students who were successful in Accounting I are encouraged to sign up for Accounting II. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Accounting I COMMUNICATIONS IN BUSINESS: Communications in Business is designed to help the student to communicate in a clear, concise, and correct manner on personal and professional levels. Students will use critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills to learn to communicate better by writing letters and participating in interviews. Secretarial and office related job skills will be stressed. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit COMPUTATION IN BUSINESS: Computation in Business is designed to help students improve problem-solving skills that occur in many business and personal situations. Students will apply basic mathematical concepts to solve problems relating to banking, credit versus cash prices, personal taxes such as payroll and income taxes. The course provides a good basic foundation in mathematical business applications with emphasis on related skills. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit COMPUTER APPLICATIONS: Computer Applications is designed as an introductory course in computer literacy with hands on experience. The student will learn to operate the Microcomputer and get a brief introduction to Computer Literacy, Word Processing, Database Management, and Spreadsheet. Students who passed Computer Discovery in the 8th grade do not need to take Keyboarding and Computer Applications. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit 65
 
 



 


KEYBOARDING: The course, Keyboarding, is designed to develop touch keyboarding skill. Keyboarding is recognized as a communication skill and tool of literacy for all. The course emphasizes correct finger reaches, proper stroking, and efficient use of the various machine mechanisms. Applications are confined to simple problems of centering, letter format, memoranda, and forms. Students who passed Computer Discovery in the 8th grade do not need to take Keyboarding. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit PERSONAL FINANCE: This course is designed to assist students in selecting a career, aggressively seeking that career, determining gross and net pay, and investing their personal finances to achieve maximum success in life. Students complete federal tax forms, reconcile a bank statement, and prepare a month’s budget based upon personal information. This course provides a wide variety of useful and practical information that has a direct bearing on every student’s future. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit

COMPENSATORY EDUCATION
COMPENSATORY MATHEMATICS: The purpose of this course is to improve math skills for the world of work. Emphasis is on money skills, checking accounts, saving accounts, taxes, and payroll. In addition, there is an introduction to algebraic and geometric skills. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ or 1 unit COMPENSATORY READING I & II: The purpose of this course is to increase student proficiency in the reading process. Students will review the process of word analysis and decoding as well as applying comprehension strategies to gain information from a wide range of materials. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ or 1 unit COMPENSATORY WRITING I & II: The purpose of this course is to help students express meaning effectively, competently, and confidently in an appropriate communication mode. Emphasis is on oral language as well as written language skills for the world of work. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS: The purpose of this course is to give the students increased knowledge and awareness of careers and strategies to be successful in seeking and holding a job. Emphasis is on writing job resumes, completing job applications and interviews, and communicating effectively on the job. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: ½ or 1 unit LEARNING STRATEGIES: The purpose of this course is to teach study skills and strategies for formulating questions, scanning materials, using different resources, and improving listening and writing skills. Emphasis is on organizational skills, good study habits, and planning for success in academic classes. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ or 1 unit 66
 
 



 


DRIVER EDUCATION: Driver Education is a course that influences students to become safer drivers. Students must be 14 years of age and have a certified birth certificate (not a copy) and a social security card in order to take driver education. The course will consist of drug and alcohol research, 30 hours of classroom work, 12 hours in the simulator, and 3 hours of actual driving. A student must be 14 years old and have a Learner’s Permit before beginning Driver’s Education. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit

ENGLISH
ENGLISH I: This course is comprised of the study of mechanics, composition, and literature. Language conventions are incorporated into compositions. Emphasis is placed on preparation for the English II state tests. Grade: 9 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: 9th Graders must meet all prerequisites established by BHS ENGLISH I, ACCELERATED: Same as English I. Grade: 9 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: A or B in 8th grade English ENGLISH II: This course consists of language conventions, reading comprehension, and narrative and informative essay writing to prepare for the English II state tests. Passing all three parts of the English II state test—multiple choice, narrative essay, and informative essay—is required for graduation. STATE TEST Grade: 10 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: English I ENGLISH II, ACCELERATED: Same as English II Grade: 10 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: A or B in English I ENGLISH III: This course consists of language conventions, compositions, and American literature. Outside reading and a research paper are required. Grade: 11 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: English II ENGLISH III, ACCELERATED: Same as English III Grade: 11 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: A or B in English II ENGLISH IV: This course consists of language conventions, compositions, portfolios, a research paper, and English Literature. A senior project (portfolio) is required for graduation. Grade: 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: English III 67
 
 



 


ENGLISH IV, ACCELERATED: Same as English IV Grade” 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: A or B in English III ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION, ADVANCED PLACEMENT: Advanced Placement English Language focuses on literature and composition. In part, the students examine models of writing in various genres; the short story, poetry and drama. The class requires a major research paper and several smaller writing projects. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION, ADVANCED PLACEMENT: Advanced Placement English Literature is the traditional second-year college class in English. It is a survey of English thought through writing from the metaphysical poets to the present day. It is as much intellectual history as it is English literature. Grade: 12 Credit: 1 unit AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: This course is a survey course which draws upon a compilation of genres, themes, styles, and language used by various writers of African-American descent. The student will recognize and appreciate contributions of selected authors through reading, speaking, and viewing selected works and by research and writing. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ units Prerequisite: English I COMMUNICATIONS, ORAL I: Oral Communication is the study of the uses and effective ways of communication. The course provides vehicles that teach interpersonal communication, effective listening habits, a sense of self-conception, correct voice quality and diction and true self-esteem. The student is introduced to forensics and debate to be used in state wide and national competition. The areas of public speaking, group interaction, parliamentary procedure, and oral interpretation are taught in depth. Choral reading is introduced. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit COMMUNICATIONS, ORAL II: This course is an advanced study of the use of communication in our society. The students will learn and present different styles of public speaking. The students will be required to prepare and present programs for the community. The students will leave this course with a working knowledge of parliamentary procedure, debate, mock trial, and youth congress. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Theatre I or Oral Communications I CREATIVE WRITING: The Creative Writing course will provide the student practice in the processes of composing poems, personal descriptive and narrative essays, and short fiction. The course affords an opportunity for self-expression, promotes critical thinking, expands the imagination, and develops the use of figurative and literal language. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ units Prerequisite: English I 68
 
 



 


INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM: Introduction to Journalism is a general course to enhance the students’ skills as communicators and as informed users of the communications media. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit JOURNALISM LAB I: Students will perform specific duties, assume leadership functions as editors, and produce a school newspaper, The Panther Prints. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Introduction to Journalism JOURNALISM LAB II: Students will perform specific duties, assume leadership functions as editors, and produce the school yearbook, Ole Brook. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Introduction to Journalism JOURNALISM LAB III: In Laboratory III, students assume management/ editorial positions for the publications staff in addition to duties acquired in previous laboratories. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Journalism Lab I or Introduction to Journalism MYTHOLOGY: The Mythology course will include reading of myths from several cultures. The content will also include an epic by Homer or Virgil. Group discussions, individual presentations, and writing experiences will be required in this course. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit Prerequisite: English I and English II

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE
FAMILY DYNAMICS: Family Dynamics is a course which utilizes skills in critical thinking, decisionmaking, communication, conflict management, and resource management as they relate to personal development and responsible family and parenting decisions. The focus of the course is to provide knowledge and skills to grow as individuals and assume responsibility for the direction of life and to consider the demands and challenges involved in creating and maintaining a healthy family in today’s society. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
It is required that a ninth grade student have a “B” average in English in the 8th grade in order to take a foreign language. It is recommended that 10th – 12th graders have a “C” average in English before taking a foreign language course. It is preferable that a student take two years of the same language. LATIN I: It is recommended that students have a basic grasp of English grammar before taking Latin. Students will study the grammar and syntax of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Strong emphasis 69
 
 



 


is placed on developing English vocabulary through the study of Latin roots and derivatives. Students will also gain an understanding of Roman civilization and classical mythology. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit LATIN II: Latin II is a continuation of Latin I. The student will continue to study the grammar and syntax of the language with emphasis on an increasing level of complexity. Translations will be from a variety of Roman writers. Students will also study the history of the Roman Republic and empire. Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Latin I SPANISH I: Students should have a strong background in English grammar before enrolling in Spanish. This includes a study of pronouns, the regular, irregular and reflexive verbs, drill on the essentials of Spanish grammar, oral practice, simple written translations, reading of easy stories, and classroom conversation. Students who successfully complete the first year of a foreign language are encouraged to take a second year of that foreign language. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit SPANISH II: This course consists of a review of grammar, drills on radical changing verbs and idioms, and the Spanish American authors. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Spanish I SPANISH III: The focus of the third-year course is on reading, writing and speaking Spanish with a strong review of grammar and continuing study of the more subtle aspects of the language. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Spanish I and Spanish II

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH: This one term health course offers detailed information in the areas of the human body, drug abuse, first aid and safety, mental health, and the social aspects of interactions among adolescents. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit PHYSICAL EDUCATION: The program will consist of seasonal major sports such as touch football, basketball, volleyball, tennis, baseball, softball, track and field events. In addition much emphasis will be placed on such recreational sports and games as students’ needs and interests indicate. There will also be some time devoted to stunts and athletic events on an individual and group basis. Dressing rooms with showers are provided for all physical education students. All physical education students will be required to “dress out” and purchase a P.E. uniform. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ or 1 unit 70
 
 



 


Students going into the 9 grade need to follow this sequence: passed Algebra I, go to geometry; passed Transition to Algebra, go to Algebra I; students in Pre-algebra need to go to Transition to Algebra; students with F in Pre-algebra need to take Pre-algebra again for credit; students who took Saxon math only must take Pre-algebra. The math sequence is as follows: Pre-Algebra, Transition to Algebra, Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, and Calculus. Not all students need to take all subjects: however, students may not go backward in the math sequence. ALGEBRA I: The understanding of algebraic representation is a useful tool for applying mathematics in everyday life as it is related to problems of finding unknown values that relate to space and quantity. The Algebra I course will provide opportunities for students to become mathematical problem-solvers, to gain confidence in their ability to use mathematics, to learn to communicate and to reason mathematically, to generalize when appropriate, and to make mathematical connections. STATE TEST Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: 9th Graders must meet all prerequisites established by BHS ALGEBRA II: The Algebra II course is to serve as an extension of Algebra I. It will continue to provide opportunities for students to become mathematical problem solvers, to gain confidence in their ability to use mathematics, to learn to communicate and to reason mathematically, to generalize when appropriate, and to make mathematical connections. However, the Algebra II course will provide students with a wider variety of topics to be explored in greater depth than in Algebra I. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry CALCULUS, AP: The AP Calculus course is intended for those students who wish to seek college credit and/or placement from institutions of higher learning. It is also intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, rectangular and polar coordinates, equations and graphs, lines, and conics sections. Students should gain confidence in their ability to analyze and process calculus with elementary functions. Grade: 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus GEOMETRY: The geometry curriculum should provide experiences that increase students’ understanding of shapes and their properties. Providing students the opportunity to visualize and work with two-and threedimensional figures enables them to develop spatial skills fundamental to everyday life and to many careers. Applications of previously learned algebraic skills, logic, and development of deductive and inductive reasoning skills should be utilized. Even though proof remains an important component on the geometric course, a shift from the traditional two column deductive proof removes proof as the primary focus of the course to one in which the student provides informal arguments either orally or in writing. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Algebra I Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit 71
 
 


th

MATHEMATICS


 


PRE-CALCULUS: The pre-calculus course serves as a bridge between advanced mathematics courses and calculus, and increases analysis skills which enhance success in calculus. Instruction should emphasize problem solving, reasoning, communicating, connecting, estimating, assessing, and using technology. The critical thinking process should provide students with mathematical confidence and ability. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit Prerequisite: Trigonometry TRANSITION TO ALGEBRA: This is a course intended to be a bridge between the concrete concepts of Pre-Algebra and the abstract concepts of Algebra I and Geometry. This course will be activity-based, allowing students to explore and investigate algebraic and geometric concepts to build a stronger foundation of basic skills. This course is designed for those students who have completed Pre-Algebra and desire an alternative before taking Algebra I. A student must a 90 or above in Pre-Algebra to skip Transition to Algebra. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra TRIGONOMETRY: The trigonometry course is to serve as a bridge between algebra/geometry and precalculus and form a foundation for success in calculus. The study of trigonometry extends algebraic skills to the exploration of circular and triangular functions with their properties and graphs. Instruction should encompass problem solving, reasoning, communicating, connecting, estimating, assessing, and using technology. Students should gain confidence in their ability to manipulate trigonometric functions and should learn to value the appreciation of trigonometry to real world situations. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit Prerequisite: Algebra II

MILITARY SCIENCE
JROTC I, II, III, IV, V, VI,VII,VIII: JROTC motivates young people to be better Americans. The course provides instruction in leadership, military drill, first aid, map reading, communications skills, and conflict resolution, rifle marksmanship (optional) and physical fitness. Students have the opportunity to be a part of teams that compete against other JROTC students in competition in Mississippi and Louisiana. A small number of outstanding students go to Camp Shelby for summer camp for one week during the summer. Wearing of the uniform one day a week is mandatory for successful course completion. Students incur no military obligation but those students electing to enlist in the military receive an accelerated promotion after successful completion of LET III. Students can compete for a small number of 4-year ROTC college scholarships. Students should be in reasonably good health as the course involves a moderate amount of physical activity. Uniforms are available in the following sizes: females—8 to 26; males—26 coat, 26 trousers to 52 coats, 48 trousers. Enrollment in LET II and above requires permission from the Senior Army Instructor. LET V-VIII are BHS electives. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit per course

SCIENCE
BIOLOGY I: This course stresses biological principles and the fundamental processes of living things. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between living things and the environment, and on laboratory processes. STATE TEST Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite 9th Graders must meet all prerequisites established by BHS 72
 
 



 


BIOLOGY II: Biology II is a laboratory-based course that continues the study of life. Units studied will include biochemical life processes, heredity, natural selection and populations, behavior patterns, and advanced classification and organism studies. Critical thinking, projects, research, and group laboratory experiences will be emphasized. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Biology I BIOLOGY,GENERAL ADVANCED PLACEMENT: The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a first-year college general biology course. This course is taught in the manner of college level instruction. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Biology I and chemistry with “B” or better Recommended: Biology II or HAP BOTANY: Botany is a laboratory-based course applying basic biological principles to the study of bacteria, protists, fungi, and plants. Topics studied will include morphological characteristics of each kingdom and variations in their reproduction, taxonomy, and physiology. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ credit Prerequisite: Biology I CHEMISTRY I: This course emphasizes a fundamental study of matter. It focuses heavily on problem solving through the study of basic reactions of matter and laboratory experiments. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Biology, Algebra I, and either taking or completed Algebra II CHEMISTRY, ADVANCED PLACEMENT: The Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of a first year college chemistry course. This course involves a more in depth laboratory section than the general chemistry course. This course is taught in the manner of college level instruction. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Algebra II, Biology I and Chemistry I with a B or better HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY: This course is recommended for college bound students who plan to major in biological science or some related area. The course includes individual research in the field, laboratory and scientific research activities. Emphasis is placed on the study of the structures and functions of the human body systems, disorders or dysfunctions of those systems, and careers related to the field of human anatomy. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Biology I with a “C” or higher PHYSCIAL SCIENCE: Physical science is a laboratory course which serves to introduce students to many basic concepts of physics and chemistry; including force and work, falling bodies, motion, energy, sound electricity, the periodic table atoms, solids, liquids and gases, and chemical reaction. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Algebra I and Biology I 73
 
 



 


PHYSICS: This course will provide opportunities for students to develop an understanding of matter and energy, mathematical expressions and concept exploration. Concepts covered in this course include: kinematics, dynamics, energy, mechanical and electromagnetic waves and electricity. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, and either taking or have completed Algebra II PHYSICS, ADVANCED PLACEMENT: Advanced Placement Physics includes an in-depth study of topics from first-year physics as well as electronics, superconductivity, nuclear and particle physics, plasma physics, fusion energy, modern physics, logic circuits and computers. Grade: 12 Credit: 1 unit Prerequisite: Physics and Trigonometry, registration in Calculus is recommended INRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY: This course will provide students with an overview of basic biology with an emphasis on organizational skills, critical thinking, reasoning skills, and methods of science. Laboratory experiences and scientific literature will be used as investigative tools to emphasize critical analysis and concept comprehension. Since this is a 9th grade course, the only way an 11th or 12th grade student may take this course is because of extenuating circumstances and approval from the administration. A student must have 90 or above in 8th grade science to skip Science Skills and Reasoning. Grade: 9 Credit: 1 unit ZOOLOGY: Zoology is a laboratory-based course that will survey the nine major phyla of the Kingdom Animalia. Morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and physiology will be investigated. Comparative live studies may be addressed during laboratory observations and dissections. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit Prerequisite: Biology I

SOCIAL STUDIES
ECONOMICS: A study of the fundamental principles of production, consumption, and the exchange of wealth; the problems arising from industrialization and the role of the government in our economic life. Because of its technical nature, this course is recommended for seniors only. Grade: 12 Credit: ½ unit MICROECONOMICS, ADVANCED PLACEMENT: AP Microeconomics is a one-quarter (9 week) course that focuses on how economic decisions are made by individuals, firms, and organizational structures. The main areas of concentration include an introduction to economic concepts; the application of supply and demand; decision-making processes by consumers and businesses; and the functions of basic market models. Critical thinking skills are mandatory. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit EUROPEAN HISTORY,ADVANCED PLACEMENT: The Advanced Placement European History class is taught in the manner of college instruction. Students are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of basic chronology and major events and trends from approximately 1450 to the 2000’s; that is, from the high Renaissance to the present. The ultimate goals of AP European History are to develop an 74
 
 



 


understanding of some of the principle themes in modern European history and an ability to analyze historical evidence. Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, ADVANCED PLACEMENT: AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes used in shaping human understanding, use, and alteration of the surface of the Earth. Students will be able to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences, as well as how to utilize geography methods and tools. Grade: 11,12 Credit: ½ unit HUMANITIES I: This course is recommended for college preparatory students. The student will develop a greater awareness of and appreciation for the interrelationships of world culture, including history, literature, art, music, dance, and drama. Grade: 9, 10 Credit: 1 unit LAW RELATED EDUCATION: This course should give students an understanding of the legal process and the legal system, and focus on issues that can be illustrated through student’s experiences. The course should focus on these topics: The Crime Problem and the Justice System, Enforcing the Law, the Role of the Police, Fair Trial, the Role of the Courts, Corrections, the Role of the Penal System, and Mississippi Law as it pertains to young people. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit MINORITY STUDIES: This course should help the student to recognize that the U. S. is a multicultural society, to recognize the contributions of minorities to the development of our country, recognize the importance of cultural heritage, and develop a respect for the value system of minorities. Groups for major focus are: women, Black Americans, Native Americans, Orientals, Hispanics. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit MISSISSIPPI STUDIES: This is a one-term course which deals with the levels of government and citizenship. The students will understand and develop an appreciation for the geography, history, government, literature, art, and music of Mississippi. It emphasizes the rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens. Laws of right and wrong behavior are stressed, thus helping to prepare one for his rightful place in today’s society. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit PSYCHOLOGY This course is recommended for college preparatory students. The student will explore the scientific nature of psychology, the influence of biological and environmental factors on human growth and development, the development of personality and the effects of abnormal behavior. This course will be an introduction to college-level psychology courses. Students need to be on honor roll or have high academic records to take this course. Grade: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 unit 75
 
 



 


SOCIOLOGY: This is a one term course in which behavior will be further examined as a function of our relationships to each other and or our membership in groups. Required reading will look into social structure as a foundation of both motivation and control of behavior. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit U. S. GOVERNMENT: This is an advanced study of the organization and functions of city, county, state, and federal governments. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its relation to the individual and the state. Grade: 12 Credit: ½ unit U. S. HISTORY: U. S. History should develop a knowledge base of political, economic, cultural, and military history of the United Stated from 1877 to the present; provide experiences to gain an appreciation of our American heritage and to promote patriotism; encourage an interest in current affairs and promote international understanding; and develop critical thinking skills. Topics to be covered include: American Culture, Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, Foreign Entanglements, Depression and Socialism, Democracy vs. Totalitarianism, World Power and Challenge of World Leadership. STATE TEST Grade: 11 or any student that has taken World History the semester immediately preceding U.S. Credit: 1 unit U.S. HISTORY,ADVANCED PLACEMENT: Advanced Placement U. S. History is the same as the U. S. history course offered in many colleges. It emphasizes the importance of the colonial period in shaping later American history and teaches history from the point of view of economic determinism. STATE TEST Grade: 11 Credit: 1 unit WORLD GEOGRAPHY, INTRODUCTION TO: This course is a study of the regional concept in geography and an analysis of major world regions. The analysis will include comparison of regions and development of cultural, economic and physical concepts as they relate to geographic understanding of a region. Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: ½ unit WORLD GEOGRAPHY, ADVANCED: The course provides an in-depth study of the regions of the world including the physical, human, economic, and future problems of each. Each continent will be a focus of study with geography, economics, culture, and social and political systems integrated to the study of the continent. Grade: 12 Credit: 1 unit WORLD HISTORY: This course includes ancient, medieval, and modern history. In the study of earlier peoples, emphasis is placed on their influence on today’s world. The study of the modern period includes the rise of national states, the industrial revolution, and the development of the idea of the rights of man, and international relations. Grade: 10 Credit: 1 unit

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TECHNICAL CENTER COURSES
Health Sciences: Health Sciences is a pathway of courses for students in the Health Sciences career cluster. The Health Sciences pathway includes classroom and hands-on experiences that will provide students with an overview of the health-care field as outlined in the States’ Career Clusters Health Science Cluster and the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education as well as begin to prepare students for careers in occupations predicted to have a high number of available jobs in the next 10 years including registered nurses, nurse aides, practical nurses, and home health aides. Health Sciences I Grade: 10, 11 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Math and English from previous year Health Sciences II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Health Sciences I Construction Trades : Construction is an instructional program that prepares students for employment or continued education in the occupations of carpentry. Construction Trades I Grade: 10, 11 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Algebra I Construction Trades II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Construction Trades I Culinary Arts: Commercial Foods is designed to prepare students to plan, purchase and serve food in all types of food service settings using nutritional values, quantity cooking techniques, large equipment and guidelines in sanitation. Culinary Arts I Grade: 10, 11 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Math and English from previous year Culinary Arts II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I *Digital Media Technology: This program is designed for students who wish to develop, design, and implement projects in the fast growing field of digital media. The program emphasizes the techniques and tools used in digital media and the creative design or content of such media. Both theoretical learning and activity-based learning are provided for students who wish to develop and enhance their competencies and skills. The course focuses on the basic areas of computer graphics, multimedia, and animation. Exposure to state-of-the-art equipment is given through advice by experts from industry. 77
 
 



 


Digital Media Technology I Grade: 10, 11 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Overall “B” Average Digital Media Technology II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Digital Media Technology I *Engineering: This program is designed for students who wish to develop, design, and implement projects in the fast growing field of digital media. The program emphasizes the techniques and tools used in digital media and the creative design or content of such media. Both theoretical learning and activity-based learning are provided for students who wish to develop and enhance their competencies and skills. The course focuses on the basic areas of computer graphics, multimedia, and animation. Exposure to state-ofthe-art equipment is given through advice by experts from industry. Engineering I Grade: 10, 11 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: “C” or Higher in Pre-Algebra Engineering II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Engineering I Marketing Management Technology: Marketing Management Technology programs provide instruction in marketing skills and related sales operations in retailing. Courses in the program provide a foundation of skills and knowledge related to basic principles of marketing and related economic fundamentals, management, merchandising, communications and career development, human relations, ethics, and etiquette. Marketing Management Technology I Grade: 10, 11 Credit: 2 units Marketing Management Technology II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units; ½ credit of economics; ½ credit of personal finance Prerequisite: Marketing Management Technology I Technology Applications II: Technology Applications students are introduced to basic laws and fundamentals of electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics, robotics, lasers, programmable controllers, computernumerical controls, and thermal systems. Technology Applications II Grade: 11, 12 Credit: 2 units Prerequisite: Technology Applications I *Programs offered pending approval from the Mississippi Department of Education

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COLLEGE
ADMISSIONS

Coping with College Admission (Standardized) Testing
Researchers at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching estimate that there are “probably fewer that 50 colleges and universities in the United States today that can be considered highly selective, admitting less than half the students who apply.” If we stretch this statistic a bit to include all of the “most”, “highly+,” and “highly” selective institutions categorized in the Comparison Guide to American Colleges, we arrive at about 100 schools, most of which rely heavily on standardized testing for their selection process. That leaves 2,900 others, one-third of which maintain open-door admission policies. Clearly, the overwhelming majority of collegiate institutions in America base their decision on quality of course work pursued, grades received, required essays, and an assortment of non academic factors. Nevertheless, standard testing is a persistent reality with which students must deal.

College Admission Testing Summary
PLAN PLAN is a practice test for the ACT that also provides information to assist students in their career and college planning. Some high schools make this test available to sophomores. ACT Students generally take the ACT examination during their junior and /or senior year. Students receive scores in English, Reading, Math, and Science Reasoning, as well as a Composite score. There is also an optional Writing Test. These areas are tested because they include the major areas of instruction in most high school programs. How is the ACT scored? On the ACT there is no penalty for guessing, students should answer every question. PSAT/NMSQT This test is an abbreviated version of the Scholastic Aptitude test (SAT). It has two sections: verbal and mathematics. The PSAT is offered in October, and it is primarily for juniors. Scores are reported on a scale of 20-80. It is considered, a practice test, and results are not reported to colleges unless a student specifically requests them to be. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation uses PSAT results as an initial screening device for those juniors who wish to be considered for National Merit recognition. A selective index score is derived by doubling the PSAT verbal score and adding the mathematics score. The top one-half of one percent of the students in each state are designated as “semifinalists” in the competition. Those students who fall immediately below semifinalist status and who are in the top five percent of the students in each state are designated as “’commended” students. SAT I The new SAT I has three sections: Critical Reading, Math, and Writing. The SAT normally is taken by juniors in May or June of junior year and by seniors in November or December of senior year. How is the SAT scored? On the SAT there is a slight penalty for guessing, if a student has no idea what the answer is, he/she should leave it blank. If a student can eliminate one or more answer choices, he/she should make an educated guess. SAT II The SAT II: Subject Tests are one-hour, primarily multiple-choice tests in specific subjects that measure knowledge or skills in a particular subject and your ability to apply that knowledge. Some selective colleges require or recommend that applicants take the SAT II: Subject Tests for admission/or placement. These colleges will list the SAT II as a requirement in their admissions information. 79
 
 



 


WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO TAKE THE ACT/SAT
Colleges and universities use the ACT and SAT to evaluate applicants for admission. Colleges believe the ACT and SAT are good indicators of how well a student will do in college as they measure how well a student can perform the skills necessary for college course work. Most colleges accept scores from either test; however, to determine if a college requires or prefers the ACT or the SAT, check their catalog or go to their Web site. Students hoping to get into a competitive college or program should take both the ACT and the SAT. Students can take the ACT and /or the SAT as many times as they want, and in most cases, colleges will use a student’s highest score. It is important to take the ACT/SAT now while you are test-taking smart, even if you are not planning to attend college or if you have chosen a program that does not require an ACT/SAT score. Your score could make you eligible for ACT/SAT scholarships and could eliminate further admission testing such as placement or TABE testing. Before you choose a test date, consider the other things that are happening in your life. • • • You want to be rested when you take the ACT/SAT so the morning after prom or a big ballgame may not be the best time for you to do your best on the ACT/SAT. When choosing a test date, consider the application deadlines of the colleges and scholarships that interest you. Allow yourself time to retake the ACT/SAT if you want or need to improve your scores.

It is important to take ACT/SAT testing seriously, because your score will affect the educational options that will be available to you after high school graduation. Your ACT/SAT scores will determine: • • • • • Which colleges you can attend What academic or technical programs you can apply for The scholarships and grants you can apply for The classes you can take as a freshman Where an athlete can sign

ACT and SAT Preparation Guides
Kaplan ACT 2012 and KaplanNew SAT 2012 / Kaplan Cracking the ACT and Cracking the SAT / Princeton Review ACT Success and SAT Success / Peterson’s Up Your Score 2011-2012 (SAT) / Workman Publishing How to Prepare for the ACT / Barron’s How to Prepare for the New SAT / Barron’s Master the ACT Assessment 2005 / ARCO ACT provides Preparing for the ACT Assessment free of charge. The purpose of this booklet is to help you do your best on the ACT. It summarizes general test-taking strategies, describes the content of each of the tests, provides specific tips for each test, and lets you know what you can expect on the test day. In this booklet are a sample test, a sample answer document, and scoring instructions. Studying this booklet will help you do your best on test day. This booklet is available in the Guidance Office.

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To prepare for the ACT and SAT, students need to go over the study guides carefully. Students also need to take at least one practice test. Of course, numerous books, videotapes, and computer programs provide additional preparation for the ACT and SAT. Important Notes: Following a strong college prep program in high school is the best preparation for both of these tests. Your ACT/SAT score is placed on your high school transcript only if you list your high school code on the ACT/SAT application.

BEYOND
HIGH
SCHOOL…

Community/Junior College or University?
Community/Junior colleges are different from universities in several ways. By knowing the key differences you will be better able to decide which one is best for you. Community colleges offer the first two years of most bachelor’s degrees. There are certain core requirements that all students must complete. Some examples are Speech, Algebra, English Composition I & II, literature courses and other courses related to particular fields. Vocational/Technical programs are available at community colleges. These programs may be completed in two years or less. Some examples of these programs are Radiology, Practical Nursing, Auto Mechanics and Cosmetology. Graduates of Vocational/Technical programs are ready for the workplace. All community colleges have professional instructors to teach the academic courses. Many universities has “assistants” (graduate students) to teach the freshmen level courses (core requirements).Universities usually have a much greater number of students on campus. There may be one hundred or more students in some classes. At community colleges, the classes are usually limited to thirty or forty. Student can receive more individual attention in the classroom and for academic advisement. A university may not be very close to your hometown. A community college is probably located closer to your home. Being closer to home in the first two years often eases the transition from high school to college. Community colleges are much less expensive that the average university. Attending a community college the first two years can significantly lower the total bill of earning a bachelor’s degree Many students say community colleges are the perfect stage for college success. But what do the universities think? How do they feel about so many students (about half) transferring in from community colleges instead of enrolling as freshmen? Truth is, they love it! More and more universities are depending on community colleges to educate the nation’s high school graduates. They know that community colleges give students the academic and social foundation they need to succeed. With that in mind, two-year and four-year colleges have developed articulation and transfer agreements so a student can set their sights on a bachelor’s degree when they enroll at a community college. A student can tackle their degree plan with two years at the community college followed by two years at a university with a smooth transition. Universities actively recruit community college transfer students because they recognize the high quality of these students. Universities reward many transfer students with academic, leadership, activities and athletic scholarships. 


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Community /Junior Colleges Admission Requirements
There are fifteen public community and junior college districts in Mississippi. All fifteen colleges subscribe to an “open door: policy. All applicants who meet admission requirements may be enrolled into the academic, vocational, technical, workforce training, or other continuing education opportunities of their choice. Admission requirements are not the same for all colleges and programs. Applicants must inquire about the specific admissions requirements for their desired college and program of study. Students who are planning to attend a community college or junior college should see their counselor or contact the admission office of the college of their choice. Community colleges are not allowed to recruit outside their legislatively assigned districts. If a Brookhaven High School student is interested in a community college other then Copiah-Lincoln Community College the student must make the first contact.

General Admission Requirements
• • • • • • • Academic & Technical Students Complete college application An official high school transcript with graduation a date and school official signature or an official General Education Development (GED) transcript with passing scores. ACT score. Housing application (if applicable) Vocational Students Complete college application An official high school diploma or an official General Education Development (GED) transcript with passing scores. Non-high school graduates must take the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) and interview with a major field advisor who will determine “ability to benefit” status.

Community/Junior College Directory.
Each State Community/Junior College has a legislatively assigned district. Lincoln County is assigned to Copiah-Lincoln Community College. Community Colleges/Junior Colleges do not recruit outside their assigned district. Interested students must make the first contact if they are interested in a Community/Junior College other than Copiah-Lincoln Community College. Coahoma Community College Website www.coahomacc.edu Admissions 1-662-621-4205 Financial Aid 1-662-621-4168 Copiah-Lincoln Community College Website www.colin.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-643-8307 Financial Aid 1-601-643-8340 East Central Community College Website www.eccc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-635-2111 x 206 Financial Aid 1-601-635-2111 x 218 Meridian Community College Website www.mcc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-0484-8895 Financial Aid 1-601-048408628 Mississippi Delta Community College Website www.mdcc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-662-246-6306 Financial Aid 1-661-246-6310 Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College Website www.mgccc.cc.ms.us Admissions 601-928-6333 Financial Aid 601-928-6225 82
 
 



 


East Mississippi Community College Website www.emcc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-662-476-5040 Financial Aid 1-662-476-5040 Hinds Community College Website www.hinds.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-857-3212 Financial Aid 1-601-857-3227 Holmes Community College Website www.holmes.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-662-472-9023 Financial Aid 1-662-472-9028 Itawamba Community College Website www.icc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-662-862-8032 Financial Aid 1-662-862-8223 Jones Community College Website www.jcjc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-477-4025 Financial Aid 1-601-477-4040

Northeast Mississippi Community College Website www.necc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-662-720-7239 Financial Aid 1-662-720-7210 Northwest Mississippi Community College Website www.nwcc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-662-562-3219 Financial Aid 1-662-562-3271 Pearl River Community College Website www.prcc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-403-1216 Financial Aid 1-601-403-1212 Southeast Mississippi Community College Website www.smcc.cc.ms.us Admissions 1-601-276-2001 Financial Aid 1-601-276-3707

University Admissions Information
To enter a Mississippi public university, students must meet admissions standards and complete the College Prep Curriculum. This section provides information on admissions standards, the College Prep Curriculum, and the Summer Developmental Program.

ADMISSION STANDARDS
How am I admitted to a Mississippi University? 1. Complete the College Prep Curriculum (CPC) with a minimum 3.2 high school grade point average (GPA) on the CPC; or 2. Complete the College Prep Curriculum with : a. A minimum 2.5 high school GPA on the CPC or a class rank in the top 50%, and b. A score of 16 or higher on the ACT (Composite); or 3. Complete the College Prep Curriculum (CPC) with: a. A minimum 2.0 high school GPA on the CPC, and b. A score of 19 or higher on the ACT (Composite); or 4. Satisfy the NCAA standards for student athletes who are “full qualifiers” under Division I guidelines. OR 83
 
 



 


Students who do not meet the above criteria are nonetheless eligible for admission. Such students must participate, however, in an on-campus placement process at the University of their Choice. The process will determine whether the student may enroll in regular freshman-level course or be required to enroll in the summer semester with mandatory participation in the Summer Developmental Program. Successful completion of the summer semester entitles the student to continued enrollment in the fall semester at the university of his or her choice. For more information on academic programs, admissions standards, and financial aid, please refer to IHL’s web page at http://www.mississippiuniversites.com or call 1-601-432-6501 for academic programs and admissions standards information or 1-800-327-2980 or 1-601-432-6997 for financial aid information. Mississippi Universities Directory There are eight State Universities in Mississippi and the University of Mississippi Medical Center. For more information on each University, visit the Institutions of Higher Learning’s website at www.ihl.state.ms.us. ALCORN STATE Website www.alcorn.edu Admissions 1-800-222-6790 Financial Aid 1-601-877-6190 www.alcorn.edu/FinAid/index.htm. Housing 1-601-877-6778 DELTA STATE Website www.deltastate.edu Admissions 1-800-GO-TO-DSU Financial Aid 1-662-846-4670 www.deltastate.edu/Admin /stu_affairs/finaid/index Housing 1-662-846-4151 MISSISSIPPI STATE Website www.msstate.edu Admissions 1-662-325-2224 Financial Aid 1-662-325-3990 www.sfa.msstate.edu Housing 1-662-325-3555 MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE Website www.mvsu.edu Admissions 1-800-844-6885 Financial Aid 1-662-254-3335 www.mvsu.edu/financialaid.html Housing 1-662-254-3592 THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI Website www.olemiss.edu Admissions 1-800-653-6477 Financial Aid 1-662-915-7175 www.olemiss.edu/depts/financial_aid/ Housing 1-662-915-7328 JACKSON STATE Website www.jsums.edu Admissions 1-800-848-6817 Financial Aid 1-601-979-2227 www.jsums.edu Housing 1-601-979-2326

MS UNIVERSITY FOR WOMEN Website www.muw.edu Admissions 1-877-462-8439,ext. 7106 Financial Aid 1-877-462-8439,ext. 7127 www.muw.edu/finaid Housing 1-877-462-8439, ext. 7127 THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MS Website www.usm.edu Admissions 1-601-266-5000 Financial Aid 1-601-266-4774 www.financialaid.usm.edu Housing 1-601-266-5000

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER Website www.umc.edu Registrar 1-601-984-1080 Financial Aid 1-601-984-1117 Housing 1-601-984-1490 Eligibility Guidelines for Athletes Colleges affiliated with athletic associations that have their own rules, regulations, and eligibility requirements. Outlined below are basic eligibility guidelines for NCAA, NAIA, and NJCAA. NCAA The NCAA website is www.ncaa.org NCAA – Division I and II colleges can offer athletic scholarships; Division III colleges (mostly smaller, private colleges) cannot. Before an athlete can play a sport or receive a scholarship at a Division I or II college, he/she must meet NCAA’s academic requirements. Division III athletes do not need to meet NCAA academic requirements. Athletes who want to go to a Division I college must have at least a 2.0 GPA in a specified number of core courses. They must also have the required SAT or ACT score. ACT/SAT requirements for Division I eligibility are based on a sliding scale. The higher the core GPA, the lower the test score required. A student with a 2.0 core GPA, for example, will be required to have a much higher test score than a student with a 3.0 core GPA. Division II athletes need a 2.0 GPA in their core courses and a minimum ACT or SAT score. BHS athletes should meet with Randy Spring/Alicia Felder as early as possible to discuss NCAA requirements to make sure that they are taking the right courses. In the spring of their junior year, athletes should take the ACT or the SAT. To initiate the eligibility process, athletes should register with the NCAA Clearinghouse after their junior year. NAIA The NAIA website is www.naia.org NAIA – NAIA can award full or partial scholarships. To play a sport or receive an athletic scholarship, an athlete must meet two of the following three NAIA requirements: • • • have the required ACT or SAT score have an overall 2.0 GPA Graduate in the top half of his/her class. NJCAA The NJCAA website is www.njcaa.org NJCAA – Division I and II community/junior colleges can offer athletic scholarships; Division III colleges cannot. There are no academic eligibility requirements for athletes entering community/junior colleges. Federal Student Aid at a Glance What is federal student aid? Federal student aid is financial help for students enrolled in eligible programs at participating schools to cover school expenses, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and transportation . A “school” could be a two-year or four-year public or private educational institution, a career school, or a trade school. Most federal aid is need-based. The three most common types of aid are grants, loans, and work-study. 85
 
 



 


1. GRANTS…financial aid that does not have to be repaid. Generally, grants are for undergraduates students, and the grant amount is based on need, cost of attendance, and enrollment status. • • 2. Federal Pell Grants for the 2012-2013 school year may be as much as $5,550. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) range from $100 to $4,000.

LOANS…borrowed money that must be repaid with interest. Both undergraduate and graduate students may borrow money. Parents may also borrow to pay education expenses for dependent undergraduate students. Maximum loan amounts depend on the student’s year in school. • • Federal Stafford Loans are made to students, and Federal PLUS loans are made to parents. There are two loan programs: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program: eligible students and parents borrow directly from the federal government at participating schools. Direct Loans include Direct Stafford Loans, Direct PLUS Loans, and Direct Consolidation Loans. Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program: private lenders provide federally guaranteed funds. FFELs include FFEL Stafford Loans, FFEL PLLUS Loans, and FFEL Consolidation Loans. Federal Perkins Loans are offered by participating schools to provide low-interest loans to students that demonstrate the most need.





3. WORK-STUDY…lets you earn money for education expenses while enrolled in school. Note: Not all schools participate in all of the Federal Student Aid (FSA) programs. Ask your college’s financial aid administrator which programs are available. Who gets federal student aid? Some of the requirements to receive aid from the U.S. Department of Education’s FSA programs are that you must: • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen with valid Social Security Number; • Have a high school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate, pass an approved ability-to-benefit (ATB) test, or be a home schooled student who meets certain criteria ( call the toll-free number below for details); • Enroll in an eligible program as a regular student seeking a degree or certificate; and • Register (or have registered) with the Selective Service if required. • How do you apply for federal student aid? Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) The FAFSA lists deadlines for federal and state aid. Check deadlines! Schools and states may have different deadlines for aid. You may apply on line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. If you don’t have Internet access, you can get a paper FAFSA from: A high school guidance counselor A College financial aid office A local public library; or The Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243) Review your Student Aid Report (SAR) One to four weeks after you submit your FAFSA, you will receive your SAR, either by an e-mail link or on paper. The SAR confirms the information reported on your FAFSA an will tell you your 86
 
 




• •


 


• •

Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Your financial aid administrator will use the EFC to determine the amount of federal aid for which you qualify. Contact the school(s) you might attend. Talk with the financial aid administrator(s) at the school(s) you are interested in attending. They will review your SAR and prepare a letter outlining the amount of aid (from all sources) that their school will offer you.

For more information visit www.studentaid.ed.gov. Mississippi Resident Tuition Assistance Grant (MTAG) In 1995 the Mississippi Legislature established the Mississippi Resident Tuition Assistance Grant (MTAG) which offers financial aid assistance to Mississippi residents attending state approved public and nonprofit two-year and four-year eligible colleges and universities. The primary objective of the MTAG is to provide educational opportunities for students who wish to pursue post secondary education in the state. Available to the student who meet these general requirements:  Meets all eligibility requirements by the designated deadline date  Is a freshman, sophomore, junior or senior. Students working on a second vocational certificate, second associate's degree, second bachelor's degree, graduate degree or professional degree are not eligible.  Is a resident of Mississippi for one year prior to enrollment in college and provides MTAG supporting documents. MTAG supporting documents  Is accepted and enrolled full-time in undergraduate course work at one eligible Mississippi college or university. Full-time is defined as at least 12 hours at institution on semester schedule and as at least 9 hours at institution on trimester schedule.  Receives less than the full Federal Pell Grant as determined by the completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Our office uses the latest version of the results of the process FAFSA to determine an applicant's Pell Grant eligibility.  Does not receive any combination of student financial aid, including MTAG, in excess of cost of attendance or financial need as established by the institution  Completes the online web application and has all supporting documents on file with the Mississippi Office of Student Financial Aid by the deadline date. The MTAG website is www.ihl.state.ms.us/financialaid/mtag.html. High School senior applicants must meet the general requirements listed above and these academic requirements:  Have achieved a cumulative 2.5 high school grade point average on a 4.00 scale after a minimum of seven semesters  Have scored a minimum of 15 on the ACT. Scores resulting from the national testing of the ACT are the only accepted scores for state eligibility. Residual test scores are not acceptable.  A minimum score of 720 on the SAT I test may be substituted for the ACT test score.

87
 
 



 


Mississippi
Higher Education Legislative Plan for Need Students (HELP)

STATE AND FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID SUMMARY
Not to exceed tuition and required fees at a public institution; not to exceed ten semesters of eligibility, regardless of the dollar amount received by an individual Cumulative 2.5 GPA on a 4.0 Help Applic; scale, 20 ACT (national testing), FAFSA Specific High School Core Curriculum, Mississippi resident, full-time student; a 2-year average Adjusted Gross income (AGI) less than $36,500

Mississippi Tuition Assistance Grant

Maximum MTAG award of $500 One-year Mississippi resident MTAG Applic.; based on Pell Grant award. enrolled as a full-time student FAFSA in an academic or technical program. Other general eligibility requirements can be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

Mississippi Eminent

Maximum MESG based on tuition. One-year Mississippi resident MESG Applic.; Scholars Grant (MESG) enrolled as a full-time student in FAFSA an academic or technical program. Must be a "first-time-in-college" student. Other general eligibility requirements can be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

Federal
Federal Pell Grant $400-$4050 per year; Non-repayable Undergraduate with *demonstrated need. Must maintain satisfactory academic progress. FAFSA

Federal Stafford Loan

Maximum $2625 for freshmen, $3500 per year for sophomores. Variable interest rate.

Undergraduate students with demonstrated financial need.

Federal Stafford Loan Application; FAFSA

Federal Work-Study Program

$750-$1800 per year; Students work up to 10 hours per week on campus. (Usually more applicants than jobs.)

Undergraduates with Work-Study demonstrated need. Priority Application; given to full-time students. FAFSA

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG)

$100-$4000 per year; (realistic maximum based on funding is $1000) Non-repayable. This is not an entitlement program.

Undergraduate with FAFSA demonstrated need. Must maintain satisfactory academic progress. Priority given to full-time students. Must be Pell eligible.

*In
the
awarding
of
funds
from
these
grant
programs,
the
college
defines
"demonstrated
need"
as
the
amount
actually
owed
to
 the
college
less
any
financial
aid
received.

If
students
still
have
a
balance
due
to
the
college
after
this,
they
are
considered
for
 these
programs
on
a
first‐come‐first‐serve
basis
according
to
the
date
their
financial
aid
application
is
completed.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



88
 
 



 


SCHOLARSHIPS

Very important note: Scholarship searches that charge a fee are very seldom worth the money, and many are scams. Finding and applying for scholarships takes a great deal of time and effort! The scholarship search and application process can be overwhelming. Thousands of scholarships are available, and you are not going to be eligible for every single one. However, if you start looking as early as possible, stay organized and keep on searching even when you feel like you have exhausted all your leads, you have a better chance of winning a scholarship. Start your search with a visit to the public library, high school counselor and prospective college’s financial aid office Web site. In addition, search scholarship databases online. Three good Web sites to visit are: • www.fastweb.com • www.supercollege.com • www.wierscholar.com Do not forget to contact local businesses about potential scholarship opportunities, including your or your parents’ workplace and community, religious and civic organizations. Most scholarships have very specific criteria. Awards are based on academics, on your hobbies, organizational affiliations, career goals, geographic area, ethnicity and financial need, just to name a few. There are also many offbeat scholarships out there, such as one for designing your prom dress using duct tape. The bottom line is you cannot receive a scholarship if you do not apply.

Scholarship Application Tips
• • • • • • • Start early. Begin looking into scholarship possibilities during your junior year. Contact the financial aid office of the college or colleges you are considering and ask them for information on the scholarships they offer. Put the applications in order by deadline. Apply for as many scholarships as possible. Prepare and maintain a resume of your history and achievements. Always have someone proof your applications and essays. Prepare for interview portions of applications

Some scholarships can be for large sums of money with very little competition simply because people do not know they are available. Make your scholarship search through and ambitious. Your efforts will pay off.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 






89



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 90
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Appendix  
 
~Handbook Acknowledgement Form~ ~Written Excuse Form~ ~Non-Corporal Punishment Agreement Form~ ~Use of Internet and Other Electronic Resources Policy~ ~BSD Administering of Medication Policy~ ~Administering of Medication Form~ ~BHS Disciplinary Actions for Team Rule Violations~ ~AJH Football Schedule~ ~BHS Football Schedule~ ~BHS Alma Mater~

91
 
 



 


92
 
 



 


Dr. Lisa Karmacharya, Superintendent To: Parents, Guardians or Custodians, and Students of the Brookhaven School District To ensure that the parents and students of the Brookhaven School District are aware of the policies and procedures of the district, this Parent/Student Handbook has been published and provided to you for your review. This Handbook includes school board policy concerning the following: of Trustees. In accordance with MS Code 37-11-53 (1), the District requests that you sign that statement below which is verification that you have been given notice of the discipline policies of this school. Your child will also be given a review of this handbook at school. We urge you to read the entire manual, the policies listed above, and the Student Conduct/Severe Disruption Policy prior to signing. Remember that all students are required to abide by these rules while attending this school as well as any function in connection with this school. After signing the statement, please detach and have your child return to his/her teacher. I have received the 2012-2013 Elementary / Secondary (Circle One) Parent/Student Handbook and verify that I have been given notice of the policies and procedures that will be enforced at this school during the 2012-2013 school term. __________________________________________ Student ___________________________________________ Parent, Guardian, Custodian Street Address: 326 E. Court Street, Brookhaven, Mississippi

Brookhaven School District Code of Conduct (p. 37) The Assertive Discipline Plan for this school (p. 47) Brookhaven School District Discipline Plan (p. 46) Brookhaven School District Policy concerning Classroom Management (p. 35) Brookhaven School District Policy concerning Parental Responsibilities (p. 46)

The policies and procedures in this handbook have been approved by the Brookhaven School District Board

_______________ Date ________________ Date
Phone: (601) 833-6661


 

93
 
 



 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 94
 
 



 



 Brookhaven
School
District
 Parent
Written
Excuse
Form
 Student’s
Legal
Name:
______________________________________
 Date
of
Absence(s):
________________________________________
 School:
__________________________________________________
 Homeroom
Teacher:
_______________________________________
 Please
excuse
___________________________________
(student’s
name)
for
being
absent
on
the
days
listed
 above.
 Please
check
the
reason
that
applies:
 
A.____
Prior
approved
authorized
school
activity
 
B.
____
Illness
or
injury
 
C.____
Isolation
required
by
health
official
 
D.____
Death
or
serious
illness
of
a
member
of
immediate
family
 
E.____
Prior
approved
medical
or
dental
appointment
 
F.____
Attendance
at
the
proceedings
of
a
court
or
administrative
tribunal
if
the
student
is
a
party
to
the
action
or
 under
subpoena
as
a
witness
 
G.____
Prior
approved
absence
for
a
religious
event
 
H.____Prior
approved
valid
educational
opportunity
 
I.____Other
prior
approved
conditions
sufficient
to
warrant
non
‐
attendance
 This
excuse
must
be
received
within
3
days
of
your
child’s
absence.
If
an
excuse
is
not
received
in
the
time
 required,
the
absence
will
be
considered
unexcused.
If
you
have
any
questions,
please
contact
the
Attendance
 Clerk
at
the
school.
 Parent
Signature:
____________________________________________
Phone
#
___________________
 DATE:
_________________
 
 
 
 95
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 96
 
 



 
 


Brookhaven School District  Non‐Corporal Punishment Agreement  2012‐2013  






I understand that the Brookhaven School District Discipline Plan includes corporal punishment for students in grades K-8. The policy is in harmony with the Brookhaven School District Board Policy. My disagreement with the policy confirms that I agree with the terms explained below. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------By refusing corporal punishment for my child, I agree to be contacted any time by the school and that I will come to the school any time if called. I will support the school in all efforts until school officials determine my child’s behavior is acceptable and conducive to the learning environment. My child understands these actions as well. ________________________________________ Student _________________________________________ Parent ___________________ Date ____________________ Date

97
 
 



 


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