British Invasion Influence

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As this paper has demonstrated, the British Invasion in the Sixties was made successful by the Beatles breakthrough, which affected American popular music in various ways; the band exerted profound influence by embodying personal freedom and establishing a maturing sensibility of music, both of which were significant to the rising counterculture. However, in historical, cultural, societal and musical terms, the impact of the British Invasion was heavily reliant on the spirit of the Fifties, teen appeal, pre-existing transatlantic networks, and technological innovation – all of which conspired to make the Beatles-led British Invasion successful and significant historically in the evolution of American popular music.

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