Britain for learners of english chapter 1

Satisfactory Essays
SCC UK Summary Tentamen 1
Chapter 1

Great Britain and Ireland
Why is Great Britain called “Great” Britain?
They put the word “Great” in front of Britain to distinguish it from a smaller area in France called “Brittany”
•Geographically➔ Lying off the north-west coast of Europe there are two large islands and hundred of smaller ones. Largest one➔ Great Britain.
Second large one➔ Ireland. No name for the both of them together.
•Politically➔ Two states, one of them governs Ireland and the other one governs the rest of the area, Great Britain, north-eastern area of Ireland and most of the smaller islands.
Official name is “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
Marginal note: Looking for a name
•19th and 20th centuries name➔ The British Isles.
Reason why this name was outdated➔ reminds the people of the time when Ireland was politically dominated by Britain.
•Names that have been used
-The North East Atlantic archipelago
The North-west European archipelago
IONA (Islands of the North Atlantic)
The Isles
•Whys is the name “Great Britain and Ireland” not correct.
Geographically➔ It ignores the smaller islands.
Politically➔ there are two small parts of the area on the map which have special political agreements➔ Isle of Man and Channel Islands➔ crown dependencies (not part of the UK)➔ each have internal governments, parliament and tax system➔ Both ruled by a Lieutenant Governor appointed by the British government.
Marginal note: Some historical an poetic names
Albion➔ a word used by poets and songwriters to refer to England, Scotland, Great Britain as a whole.➔origin-> Celtic➔ Greek and Roman name for Great Britain.
Romans associated Great Britain with Latin word “albus” meaning “white” ➔ Chalk cliffs around Dover on the English south coast are the first land formations one sights when crossing the sea from the European mainland.
Britannia➔ Name given by the Romans to their southern British province (present day, England and

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