Brave New World Rhetorical Analysis

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Point-of-view, allusion, and motif are three literary techniques Aldous Huxley uses to achieve the ironic commentary on contemporary values for which his novel, Brave New World, is known. The point-of-view of the savage reservations mirrors that of the poor people in the 1930s society. The savage reservations were similar to some of the Hooverville communities the less fortunate took residence in during the Great Depression. Huxley describes the reservation as “...a straggle of low buildings, a criss-cross of walls; and on three sides the precipice fell sheer into the plain” (107). The “savages” in Brave New World were forced to live in a rundown area because they chose to live differently and not participate in that society’s government. During the beginning of the Great Depression, farmers were kicked off of their land by bank employees and government officials that were once their acquaintances, but chose to work for the government.
Huxley uses an allusion to the Christian
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It is taught to be a normal and acceptable behavior at an early age. Children are praised for taking part in such activities by elders, and are encouraged to frolic in open and public spaces. “In a grassy bay between tall clumps of Mediterranean heather, two children, a little boy of about seven and a little girl who might have been a year older, were playing, very gravely and with all the the [focused] attention of scientists intent on a [labor] of discovery, a rudimentary sexual game. “Charming, charming!” the DHC repeated sentimentally” (31). In our society children are discouraged from that behavior until they reach adulthood and are married. We put heavy emphasis on the improprieties of sex, especially among the youth.
Huxley thoroughly condescends the contemporary values of our society in Brave New World. He specifically uses point-of-view, allusion, and motif to create his ironic commentary for which his novel is best

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