Brave New World: Religion

Good Essays
Thesis: Man's need for answers to questions that cannot be solved through

known applications of science and technology has resulted in the widespread

belief in religion.

I. Purpose

Elimination of stress

Addiction to soma

1. Rioting addicts

2. Religious fanatics

II Characteristics

Rituals

Sacrifices

Offerings

B. Gods

Interpreters

Pope

Dali Lama

Mustapha Mond

D. Writings

III. Function

Explaining unknown

Philosophy

Supernatural

Providing aid

Sanctioning conduct

Morals

Traditions

Delegating decisions

The Basis of Religion

In the novel "Brave New World" civilized society lives in a world of science and

technology. Major changes have occurred during the future; Utopia now revolves a religion of

drugs and sex. God and the cross have been replaced by Ford and the symbol T, the founder of the

age of machines. Instead of Sunday church, members now attend solidarity services where

morals and tradition are not learned, but rather faith is taught in the belief of hallucinations

produced by a substance known as "soma." Soma has effectively replaced the belief in a higher

being by its elimination of problems and stress resulting in a lack of imagination , creativity, or "soul."

Yet religion can still be found in today's society because of man's continuing need for answers to

questions that cannot be solved by science or technology.

Religion can be regarded as the beliefs and patterns of behavior by which humans try to

deal with problems and stress that cannot be solved through practical applications of science or

technology. "Brave New World" deals with stress by its elimination of problems through the use of

soma. As shown in the novel, the people have been addicted to soma as to the point of rioting when

their supply is threatened. Their attitude can be related to religious fanatics who accomplish violent

actions in the right of their religion.

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