Preview

brain damage and behavior

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
982 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
brain damage and behavior
Lumberton Senior High School

Psychology:
Brain Damage and Behavior

Landon Brewer
AP Psychology
F - 204
October 15, 2014
Mr. David Watkins
Abstract
An estimated ninety percent of all people who
are severely disabled by a brain injury
may experience some related emotional, behavioral, or psychiatric problems. Forty percent of these individuals may still have behavioral issues five years after the injury, and between three and ten percent need intensive ongoing assistance People with milder brain injuries may also experience behavioral problems, such as mood changes, irritability and fatigue, although these may be more difficult to identify and it is less likely
that these individuals will receive organized support related to their difficulties.

Landon Brewer
AP Psychology
October 15, 2014
Mr. David Watkins
Brain Damage and Behavior A brain injury can have different effects, such as medical, physical, cognitive (mental), emotional and behavioral. Behavioral problems are usually the most hard to deal with because they can have effects on their success in rehab, but also their social relationships, marriage problems, family problems, educational goals, safety and their ability to live a happy and free life. Behavioral problems can range from personality changes to long-term difficulties controlling their emotions, failure to block or manage drive and impulses and having control over themselves. In my report I will inform you on people with brain injuries, their families, and caregivers about the kinds of behavioral problems they may encounter and offer ways to confront those problems. Most behavioral problems after brain injury come from damage done to the frontal lobe, which is the area of the brain responsible for organization, planning, creating, evaluating, reasoning, communicating and problem solving skills. Behavior of the human brain is very complex and is, more times than not, difficult to tell which behavior is affected by

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Best Essays

    Hersdorffer, Dale, Scott L. Rauch, and Carol A. Tamminga, Long-term Psychiatric Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 24(6) (Dec 2009)…

    • 3010 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Health Care Reform

    • 1704 Words
    • 6 Pages

    An article in live science last year indicates that a senior over 65 years of age is most likely to die from falls resulting in head trauma. (Live science, 2013) “Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States, contributing to about 30% of all injury deaths. Every day, 138 people in the United States die from injuries that include TBI. Those who survive a TBI can face effects lasting a few days to disabilities which may last the rest of their lives. Effects of TBI can include impaired thinking or memory, movement, sensation (e.g., vision or hearing), or emotional functioning (e.g., personality changes, depression). These issues not only affect individuals but can have lasting effects on families and communities (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014).” Falls resulting in traumatic brain injury for seniors, if the trauma is severe, may result in months – if not the remainder of the individual’s life and leave the individual in need of around the clock nursing care. The ensuing results, if the individual survives a traumatic brain injury, may render the individual’s personality (change in mental status, mannerisms, or habits) being adversely affected to severe deficits in the senses. The capability of walking and/or talking, the…

    • 1704 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Behavioural- Everyone who has had a head injury can be left with some changes in emotional reaction and behaviour. These are more difficult to see than the more obvious problems such as those which affect movement and speech, for example, but can be the most difficult for the individual…

    • 781 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    There is no “typical” person with TBI. In discussing the immediate and residual effects of TBI, there are dimensions that vary in several extents. Brain functioning, cognitive skills, behavior changes, and social skills are some of the areas affected by TBI. What is most crucial for understanding people with TBI is to know what happens when a person suffers a brain injury. While I will not go through the medical determinants of what happens to the brain after a head injury, I will argue that the lack of awareness and education is what’s manifesting the myths about…

    • 2373 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    frontal lobe – is responsible for regulating behaviour, emotions, reasoning and parts of speech. It’s also responsible for purposeful acts such as creativity, decision making, problem solving and planning.…

    • 1001 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stress And Coping Theory

    • 961 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Recovery following an acquired brain injury is a stressful life event. In general, stress can be created in many different ways, whether as a reaction to a specific issue, the result of chronic problems, or an injury. The affected individual must overcome deficits, adapt and re-learn many skills that were not compromised prior to the brain injury along with the changing dynamics of previous relationships. The process of adjustment to acquired brain injury is often divided into a biomedical process and a psychosocial adaptation process, with psychosocial or emotional pathway being how a person perceives their circumstance and overcomes it (Brands, Wade, Stapert, Van Heugten,…

    • 961 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Pd Op 3.3

    • 1714 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The effects on an individual may have problems controlling, coordinating and communicating their thoughts and actions, but they retain their intellectual abilities. The intellectual abilities of an individual with a brain injury are likely to be interfered with the aforementioned thought coordination and communication difficulties which can make hard for them to express themselves in…

    • 1714 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Brain and Behavior

    • 496 Words
    • 2 Pages

    It is important to understand the principle of complex communication because each neural network or function area is interconnected with and influenced by other networks in other regions of the brain.…

    • 496 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Interest in this subject came from a personal experience. My husband, and many clients at the Sarnia Lambton Brain Injury Association that I was on the Board of Directors for, were unable to access appropriate services in order to attain diagnosis or treatment. Barriers to accessing diagnosis and treatment included such a lack of guidelines for immediate treatment of ABI victims, a lack of tools and often, the regulations of the adversarial automobile insurance industry.…

    • 1455 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Neuromotor IEP

    • 2026 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Several important factors will be addressed within the body of this essay. The first gives the definition of exactly what Neuromotor IEP is. Neuromotor ability is defined as a condition that; has been caused by some serve damage to the central nervous system which; includes the brain and the spinal cord. The author has chosen a specific student for the purpose of this essay, one who has suffered from a traumatic brain injury and the results of that injury. In addition the author will address and include specific issues that; surround the disability and the design and evaluation of an appropriate individualized educational goal.…

    • 2026 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Moderate - Moderate brain injuries are normally come with enhanced psychological effects such as depression and emotional and behaviour problems, processes such as thinking and organising and memory will be affected, these are normally associated with headaches or fatigue. individuals normally make a full recovery within several weeks.…

    • 1868 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Case of Phineas Gage

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages

    However when brain damage occurs, ‘the neurons in the damaged area known as lesion’, (Toates, 2007, p.267) die and changes the activity of synapses resulting to alteration in the neural network. This alteration affects behaviour and psychological disorders emerge. Consequently the alteration of behaviour suggests that the area of damage contributed to the normal or previous behaviour.…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    | * Difficulty in recognising familiar faces * Difficulty in understanding spoken words * Difficulty with identification of, and verbalization about objects * Short term memory loss * Interference with long term memory * Increased and decreased interest in sexual behaviour * Inability to categorise objects * Right lobe damage can cause persistent talking * Increased aggressive behaviour…

    • 2763 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    I have attended many sessions of the traumatic brain injury support group and I have observed the positive and negative behaviors of group members. The last session I attended was facilitated by SOAR's Outreach Coordinator. During this session, the facilitator provided educational information on the importance of self-care. She asked the individuals with brain injuries how they cope with the challenges and stress of having a brain injury. Before commencing the group, she discussed the importance of not interrupting others. Prior to starting any group therapy session, it is important to emphasize the rights of the group members. This builds an empathic relationship with the group leader and members of the group. Corey and Corey (2006) state…

    • 162 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The aspect of a healthy brain versus an unhealthy or injured brain is immense, not just in the view of mental interactions but also the physical side of it as well. The picture of the injured brain looks different to the picture of the healthy brain. It looks deformed and also some indications of a subdural hematoma. How this could affect daily life…

    • 573 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays

Related Topics