Bourdieu Cultural Capital

Good Essays
Marx's labor theory of value states that the value of a commodity is determined by the amount of labor that went into producing it. Marx defines a commodity as an external object that satisfies needs and distinguishes between two different kinds of value that can be attributed to it. Commodities have a use-value that describes their sufficiency to satisfy these needs. Then there is the exchange value, which is the commodities value in relation to other commodities on the market, which can be measured with money. This theory can be applied to the real world using the example of a car.
I own a banged up car that has quite a few miles on it and have gotten three new drivers through high school. I live off campus and have to drive to class everyday
…show more content…
The more capital a person possesses. the more powerful a position one occupies in social life. Both of these ideas are also prevalent in Marx's works. However, Bourdieu added the idea of capital beyond just the economic value. He made capital more symbolic and culture based. Bourdieu’s theory of cultural capital refers to a compilation of symbolic elements which include things such as tastes, clothing, mannerisms, material belongings, credentials, and more. These are compiled through being part of a particular social class. Sharing similar forms of cultural capital with others creates a sense of collective identity. According to Bourdieu, cultural capital comes in three forms. Cultural capital as in ones dialect or mannerisms is embodied, while a china collection or car are examples of cultural capital in its objectified state. Cultural capital such as credentials and degrees or titles that symbolize cultural competence are examples of the institutional form. If we were to apply to Bourdieu's theory of cultural capital to my car described above he would have a different

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Pierre Bourdieu theorized that each generation acquires cultural capital informally as they grow up in upper class households. For example, a person who dresses in the right suit for a job interview at a prestigious company would make a good impression and most likely get them the job. That person most likely learned how to dress from their parents and peers. Therefore, the cultural capital they learned from their parents landed them a profitable job, which will keep them in the upper class, the…

    • 141 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Bourdieu

    • 571 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Forms of Capital" written by Pierre Bourdieu addresses all the different colors of capitalism, including shades not typically seen by many. The spectrum includes such that capitalism, generally seen as having economic value, can also have cultural and meaningful purpose. In this essay, Bourdieu talks about the common misconception that capitalism is a monetary value established through academic success, though he argues that it is so much more than that. Throughout the essay, Bourdieu explains…

    • 571 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Pierre Bourdieu was an acclaimed French sociologist, anthropologist and philosopher, who is still noted today as being one of the most prominent and influential intellects in recent years. He is famous for his contributions to many subjects and areas, and much of his work is still considered today as being classics. His work is considered to be some of the most innovative and groundbreaking bodies of theory and research in contemporary social science. He is still prominent today for his many great…

    • 2026 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    On Bourdieu

    • 581 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Weekly Reflection # 1: On Bourdieu Just by reading the Compton-Lilly’s (2007) title’s article, The Complexities of Reading Capital in two Puerto Rican Families, I thought that it should be based on Pierre Bourdieu’s work, who uses, as one of his central discussions, the metaphorical representation of language in terms of capital and market. Compton-Lilly (2007) recognizes that Bourdieu’s theories of capital allowed her to framework reading capital, by analyzing how certain individuals are favored…

    • 581 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Pierre Bourdieu

    • 2130 Words
    • 9 Pages

    setting (Bourdieu 1990 p.59). Habitus…

    • 2130 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cultural Capital

    • 506 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Cultural capital exists in three states, each of which requires economical capital as the primary impetus for accumulation . First, the embodied state of cultural capital includes the individual’s investment in self-improvement such as cultivating hobbies and interests. The most difficult form of capital to transfer is embodied capital, which requires time and merit. Second, the objectified state is the appreciation of cultural goods and materials such as books and instruments by those who hold the…

    • 506 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Wilson (2002) states that from Bourdieu’s three categories of capital, the one that best determines an individual’s class is cultural capital. Bourdieu (1986) suggests cultural capital refers to the possession of assets that provide social mobility. Bourdieu classified these assets in to three categories all of which are both tangible and intangible, as with aptitudes and taste of music however; however vitally, they are not identified with salary, total assets, or any budgetary measure. The first…

    • 126 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Bourdieu: Hey Fanon ! Thanks for coming out today to discuss cultural domination with me. Fanon : Hey Bourdieu ! I am glad to be here. I have a feeling this is going to be a interesting conversation. Lets get right into it ! Bourdieu : According to me, cultural domination is the result of unequal capital that people poses in relation to their social field. Fanon : What exactly do you mean by capital? Bourdieu: When I speak of capital, I refer to three different forms that correspond with material…

    • 330 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Bourdieu and Becker

    • 5884 Words
    • 24 Pages

    COURSE BOURDIEU AND BECKER THE TWO MAIN (COMPETING) CONTEMPORARY THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR ART - the field theory (Bourdieu) and the art worlds theory (Becker) are the two theoretical frameworks scholars (economists, sociologists but also art historians) most often refer - both Bourdieu and Becker are widely cited across the world, even artists refer to their theoretical explanations of the socio-economic organization for art - the two theories share some common intuitions: 1. Both theories…

    • 5884 Words
    • 24 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Pierre Bourdieu was somewhat of a contemporary theorist who drew on the works of Marx, Durkheim, and Levi-Strauss. He believed that social life was not driven by economics, but instead was a form of exchange, and forms of domination well outside the economy. Bourdieu’s main focus was symbolic violence. According to our lecture notes, symbolic violence is “power which manages to impose meanings and to impose them as legitimate by concealing the power relations which are the basis for its force…

    • 520 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays