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Borderline Personality Disorder

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Borderline Personality Disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder
There are many abnormal psychological disorders in the DSM-IV along with various treatment options for them. The American Psychological Association’s (APA) lists that these types of disorders are genetic and learned. The main focus is of one of the possible treatments for the Axis II disorder known as borderline personality disorder (BPD) and that is Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). Through a discovery of its usefulness for individuals with this disorder, the defining data will either prove or disprove DBT as a viable treatment for BPD. By focusing on BPD as a known learned disorder we find that the discovery of which patients benefit from this certain type of treatment is important. Exploring if this treatment eases the existing symptoms of BPD is necessary and so is finding if there are some, who do not benefit from this treatment or find ease from it. We will discuss borderline personality disorder, the symptoms, and typical treatments.
Research Question
The goal of our experiment is to find out which treatment is most effective. The two treatments we are administering will be Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. Which one is most effective? Are they the same? Should they both be utilized? Do some people benefit from one therapy, while others benefit from another? Let’s form a hypothesis, and try to find some answers.
Hypotheses
With this research question poised, there are 2 hypotheses to look at: the null and alternative. The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in the effectiveness of DBT versus cognitive therapy in treating borderline personality disorder. The alternative hypothesis is that DBT is more effective than cognitive therapy in treating borderline personality disorder. Let us look at some background information regarding BPD and DBT.
Literature Review
Borderline Personality Disorder is a mental illness that affects about 75 percent of women during adolescence of

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