Bloods Gang

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Today I’m going to be speaking to you about the street gang known as the Bloods. I will be discussing the origin of the gang, some of the gang’s important members and the impact the gang has on the present day. It all began in 1971 when the gang that eventually came to establish the Bloods was created. The name of this gang was the Piru Street Boys and they were actually a set of the Crip gang, today’s biggest rivals of the Bloods. When the Piru Street Boys began their operations they were working on Piru Street in Compton, Los Angeles. After almost two years of peace however, a feud began between the Piru Street Boys and the other Crip sets neighboring their territory. The fued later turned violent as fighting evolved between former allies. As the battle continued into the end of 1972 the Piru Street Boys realized they were outnumbered and were eventually going to lose if they didn’t do something quick. They then decided that they were going to terminate peaceful relations with the Crips all together and to do so they turned to other target gangs of the Crips. They called for a meeting on Piru Street and invited these target gangs. Some of the gangs that showed up to the meeting were the Bishops, the Denver Lanes, the Leuder Park Hustlers and the L.A Brims. At this meeting the gangs discussed how to combat Crip intimidation along with the creation of a new alliance to counter the Crips. They decided to take on the wearing of an opposite color of the Crips, red, and created a united organization that later became known as the Bloods. The Early leaders of the Bloods were Sylvester Scott and Vincent Owens. They controlled the gang in its early days when the only territory the Bloods covered was in Southern Los Angeles. As the gang grew in the late 70’s to the early 90’s and it spread across the nation, the different sets grew apart and it became nearly impossible for them all to be run by one power. Because of this, each set has its own leaders. Some of the

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