Blake's The Tyger

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典he Tyger by William Blake is a beautifully written poem that brings forth many philosophical questions about the origin of the animal known as a tiger. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience and through close reading of the poem, deeper meaning is uncovered behind the literary piece. The poem consists of six quatrains or what is known as four-line stanzas and contains along with that, two couplets or rhyming lines. Throughout the reading of the poem, the poem has dual layers of meaning behind its initial denotation of the origin of a tiger and more towards the origin of Satan. The questions to whom created it, where he did it, how he did it, and how the creator felt, illustrates the stream of conscious questioning behind the origin of the devil.
Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry? The poem goes through a basic order of questioning with the core question of 展hat immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry?This who question seems connotative of the idea of God as the immortal being and Creator of all things. As a tiger is a nocturnal predator of the night, 澱urning brightalso also brings forth the imagery of fire and contains consonance. Tigers bring forth imagery of brilliantly orange colored fur and black stripes merged together. This also is a colored illustrations of biblical descriptions of Hell itself. 的n the forests of the nightdemonstrate operation in the darkness, something Satan does as well. The duality of meaning in the tiger's image and biblical allusion to Satan as the central character of the poem start the stream of rhetorical questioning the author has.

In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare sieze the fire?

The second stanza it asks the question of where 的n what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes?The location of where

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