Blade Runner & Frankenstein

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Frankenblade.

If society rejects the individual, the individual rejects society. This dichotomous relationship has an overarching impression that plays throughout both Blade Runner and Frankenstein in similar perspectives on how guardian/social responsibility, science and religion are thought of in society as well as how they impact individuals. The ways are shaped and moulded to their respective contexts to suit the contrasting opinions of the time is what creates different perspectives. Mary Shelley’s rejection of the Enlightenment period – scientific rationalism, and reliance on romantic ideals of God in nature highlight the social belief of religion and the natural human condition being held in higher regard than science. Though this contrasts to Ridley Scott’s commerce centred society which has a reliance on science to the point of complacency, the negative social results of unnatural – or scientific – human nature greatly impacts both human and robotic individuals. Although the perspectives on these values differ due to context, the overall theme of individual suffering and negative consequences from society by overreaching their human condition is the same.

Tyrell, in blade runner is seen as the father figure towards his creations. In the social contexts of human society, a father/guardian figure has responsibilities towards their ‘creations’ “It’s no an easy thing to meet your maker” announces Batty. “And what can he do for you?” responds Tyrell recognising his role as the ‘father’ and is responsibility towards batty, which is exemplified in the close up torso shot of Tyrell sitting over batty and stroking his hair. Tyrell has a responsibility, which was not fulfilled in Batty’s development. This imitates social and individual rejection and is evident when Roy confronts Tyrell about his wrong doings towards his creation shown through the extreme close up shot of Roy, interrupting Tyrell and demanding “I wan more life, father”. The character blocking

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