Black Codes Dbq

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As a response to the Black Codes, Congress extended the power of the Freedmen’s Bureau. It passed the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments, the Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1875, and the Enforcement Acts between 1870 and 1871.(Brinkley) These federal efforts, attempting to permit the Negro to achieve some dignity and equality in American life, provided him with food, housing, and established schools and gave him the right to vote. However, these measures failed to protect the civil rights of African Americans as waves of violence and intimidation led by the Ku Klux Klan swept over the south in the 1860s and 1870s. It used terrorism to frighten and prohibit African Americans from

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