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Topics: Drug addiction, Problem solving, Blood alcohol content Pages: 14 (5444 words) Published: October 27, 2014
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The Treatment Plan

T

he treatment plan is the road map that a patient will follow on his or her journey through treatment. The best plans will follow the patient for the next 5 years where the relapse rates drop to around zero (Vaillant, 2003). No two road maps will be the same; everyone’s journey is different. Treatment planning begins as soon as the initial assessments are completed. The patient might have immediate needs that must be addressed. Treatment planning is a never-ending stream of therapeutic plans and interventions. It is always moving and changing. I have cowritten a thorough treatment planning book and computer program that should make treatment planning easy: The Addiction Treatment Planner (Perkinson & Jongsma, 2006a, 2006b). The planner comes in two forms, as a book and as computer software. The book and software help you write your treatment plan with point-and-click simplicity and have been approved by all accrediting bodies.

How to Build a
Treatment Plan

The treatment plan is built around the problems that the patient brings into treatment. Within the treatment plan is a problem list that details each problem. The problem list comes at the end of the diagnostic summary. It tells the staff what the patient will do in treatment. It must take into account all of the physical, emotional, and behavioral problems relevant to the patient’s care, as well as the patient’s strengths and weaknesses. It must also address each of the six dimensions of ASAM that you are following.

The treatment plan details the therapeutic interventions, what is going to be done, when it is going to be done, and by whom. It must consider each of the patient’s needs and come up with clear ways of dealing with each problem. The treatment plan flows into discharge planning, which begins from the initial assessment.

The Diagnostic Summary
After the interdisciplinary team members assess the patient, they meet and develop a summary of their findings. This is the diagnostic summary. This is where members of the clinical team—the physicians, nurses, counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, recreational therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, dietitians, family therapists, teachers, pastors, pharmacists, 75

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CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING

and anyone else who is going to be actively involved with the patient’s care— meet and develop a summary of the patient’s current state and needs. The team members discuss each of the patient’s problems and how to best treat it. From this meeting, the diagnostic summary is developed. This details what the problems are, where they came from, and what is going to be done about them. It is much better to do this as a team. As you watch your team function, you will see how valuable it is to have many disciplines involved.

The Problem List
The treatment team will continue to develop the problem list as the patient moves through treatment. New problems will come up and be added or modified as conditions change. The problem list and treatment plan must be fluid. The list changes throughout treatment as different problems come up and others are resolved.

How to Develop a Problem List
A treatment plan must be measurable. It must have a set of problems and solutions that the staff can measure. The problems must be specific, not vague. A problem is a brief clinical statement of a condition of the patient that needs treatment. The problem statement should be no longer than one sentence and should describe only one problem. All problem statements are abstract concepts. You cannot actually see, hear, touch, taste, or smell the problem. For example, low self-esteem is a clinical phrase that describes a variety of behaviors exhibited by the patient. You can see the behaviors and conclude from them that the patient has low self-esteem, but...
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