Bis303 Week 7 Casestudy - Marriage and Family

Good Essays
1. What factors bind marriages and families together? How have these factors changed, and how has the divorce rate been affected?

As stated in our text, various factors can bind married couples together, such as economic interdependencies, legal, social and moral constraints, relationship, and amongst other things. In the recent years some of these factors have diminished their strengths. The modern generation sees marriage in a different perspective altogether. Individuals today feel they are stable independently, they do not need to rely on their spouse for emotional or financial support. Many are career driven and soar to conquer their dreams over settling down with a family. Such untraditional views have increased divorce rates.
2. How is “his” divorce different from “her” divorce? How are these differences related to society’s gender expectations? In your observation, are the descriptions given in this chapter accurate assessments of divorce outcomes for men and women today?

“Her” divorce often involves financial worries and task and emotional overload as she tries to be the complete parent for the children. “His” divorce involves loss of time with children, as well as a more general loneliness. Being the “visiting parent” is often difficult, but maintaining the father-child bond is significant in a child’s adjustment to divorce. Our society has traditionally envisioned the mother as the primary parent, she has the means to provide of the child in ways that the father cannot. However from some real life examples I feel both partners in a divorce suffer, cause of the divorce also makes things worse on the partner at fault. In the recent years the society is becoming more accepting to divorced parents.

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3. The remarried family has been called an incomplete institution. What does this mean?
How does this affect the people involved in a remarriage? Include a discussion of kin networks and family law. Do you think this situation is changing?

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