bipolar disorder

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Speech on Bipolar Disorder
I. Introduction
A. Attention Getter: Well I want everyone to think about this; how many people do you know are bipolar? I’m sure the things you’ve heard or seen you think they’re all crazy, but believe it or not there are many famous people with bipolar including Abraham Lincoln, Marilyn Monroe, Drew Carey, and many others. Most people who are bipolar don’t realize they are bipolar and go throughout life untreated because mentally they don’t believe they have a problem.
B. Relevance Statement: Bipolar can affect an untreated individual’s life in many ways. It can affect relationships, the lives of their children, family and even affect their job.
C. Credibility Statement: As a person who suffers from the disorder, I have been researching this topic since I found out I was bipolar in 2007. I also went untreated a long period of time because I was mis-diagnosed and therefore suffered a psychotic breakdown which lead me to the hospital where I was diagnosed.
D. Thesis Statement: I chose to talk about this subject since it has such a big impact on my life and the life of others.
E. Preview Statement: In this speech I’m going to begin to tell you about what exactly bipolar is; its genetics, and what kind of impacts it has on people’s lives.
II. Body
A. First I’m going to talk about what exactly bipolar is.
1. According to “USA today magazine”, bipolar is known as a manic-depressive illness. It’s a chronic disease that cycles between different moods and affects more than 3,000,000 Americans. If untreated it involves cycles of depression which can escalate into mania.
2. As described in the book, “Abnormal Psychology” by Richard R. Bootzin major depression is confined to depressive episodes, bipolar disorder on the other hand consists of both manic and depressive episodes. It will first appear in the form of a manic episode, which can be followed by a normal episode and then bottom out into a depressed mood and then the cycle

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