Biological Theories of Aging

Topics: Senescence, DNA, Stem cell Pages: 5 (1553 words) Published: August 13, 2013
Abstract
Despite recent advances in molecular biology and genetics, the mysteries that control human lifespan are yet to be unraveled. Many theories, which fall into two main categories: programmed and error theories, have been proposed to explain the process of aging, but neither of them appears to be fully satisfactory. These theories may interact with each other in a complex way. By understanding and testing the existing and new aging theories, it may be possible to promote successful aging.

Keywords: Aging, Biological, Theory, Programmed, lifespan
Why do we age? When do we start aging? What is the aging marker? Is there a limit to how old we can grow? These questions are often pondered by the mankind in the past couple of hundred years. However, in spite of recent advances in molecular biology and genetics, the mysteries that control human lifespan are yet to be unraveled.

Many theories have been proposed to explain the process of aging, but neither of them appears to be fully satisfactory (1). The traditional aging theories hold that aging is not an adaptation or genetically programmed. Modern biological theories of aging in humans fall into two main categories: programmed and damage or error theories. The programmed theories imply that aging follows a biological timetable, perhaps a continuation of the one that regulates childhood growth and development. This regulation would depend on changes in gene expression that affect the systems responsible for maintenance, repair and defense responses. The damage or error theories emphasize environmental assaults to living organisms that induce cumulative damage at various levels as the cause of aging.

The programmed theory has three sub-categories: 1) Programmed Longevity. Aging is the result of a sequential switching on and off of certain genes, with senescence being defined as the time when age-associated deficits are manifested. Dr. Davidovic et al discuss the role of genetic instability in aging and dynamics of the aging process (1). 2) Endocrine Theory. Biological clocks act through hormones to control the pace of aging. Recent studies confirm that aging is hormonally regulated and that the evolutionarily conserved insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway plays a key role in the hormonal regulation of aging. Dr. van Heemst discusses the potential mechanism underlying IIS and aging process(2). 3) Immunological Theory. The immune system is programmed to decline over time, which leads to an increased vulnerability to infectious disease and thus aging and death. It is well documented that the effectiveness of the immune system peaks at puberty and gradually declines thereafter with advance in age. For example, as one grows older, antibodies lose their effectiveness, and fewer new diseases can be combated effectively by the body, which causes cellular stress and eventual death (3). Indeed, dysregulated immune response has been linked to cardiovascular disease, inflammation, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and cancer. Although direct causal relationships have not been established for all these detrimental outcomes, the immune system has been at least indirectly implicated (4).

The damage or error theory include 1) Wear and tear theory. Cells and tissues have vital parts that wear out resulting in aging. Like components of an aging car, parts of the body eventually wear out from repeated use, killing them and then the body. So the wear and tear theory of aging was first introduced by Dr. August Weismann, a German biologist, in 1882, it sounds perfectly reasonable to many people even today, because this is what happens to most familiar things around them. 2) Rate of living theory. The greater an organism’s rate of oxygen basal metabolism, the shorter its life span (5). The rate-of-living theory of aging while helpful is not completely adequate in explaining the maximum life span (6).Dr. Rollo proposes a modified version of Pearl’s rate of living theory emphasizing the...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Essay about Biological Theories of Aging
  • Theories of Aging Papers: Harman’s Free Radical Theory of Aging
  • Biological Theory of Aging Essay
  • Theories of Aging Research Paper
  • Biological Theory Essay
  • Free Radical Theory of Aging Essay
  • Theories of Aging Essay
  • Essay on aging

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free