Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality

Topics: Psychology, Abraham Maslow / Pages: 3 (991 words) / Published: Jul 14th, 2015
Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality
Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality
There are two approaches to the study of personality which are the biological and humanistic approaches. The biological approach focuses on the idea that a person is born with traits that will help formulate an individual’s personality. The humanistic approach is the more focused on how you value yourself. It focuses on the creativity and spontaneous nature of humans. In this paper I will discuss Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to help understand the extent to which growth needs influence personality formation and describe the biological factors that influence the formation of personality. I will also be discussing the relationship between the biological factors and Maslow’s theory of personality. Finally I will explain the basic aspects of humanistic theory that are not compatible with biological explanations of personality.
Through Maslow’s works he came up with a hierarchy of needs and divided these deficiency needs into two categories which are “D-needs” and “D-motives”. Deficiency needs are, “the needs that are essential for survival including physiological, safety, belonging, love, and esteem needs.” (Friedman & Schustack, 2012). Physiological needs are really basic need that people need to survive like water, shelter, food, and sex. These are the needs that people need in their everyday lives. Safety needs is how an individual needs the world to be kind of predictable and make some sense. Love and belonging needs are the needs that you want to have intimate relationships with people. Finally there is the esteem needs, that is how much respect you have for yourself and others. D-motives are the motives to fill something in our lives. All together Maslow says that a person’s needs have to be met in a ranking method. A person cannot continue on to the next rank without meeting the needs that come before it.
Maslow also said that there are social



References: Friedman, H. S., & Schustack, M. W. (2012). Personality: Classic Theories and Modern Research (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

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