Bio Lab

Topics: Style guide, Hypothesis, Experiment, Scientific method, Academic publishing, Null hypothesis / Pages: 18 (4340 words) / Published: Dec 4th, 2012
Scientific Writing and Standard Components of a Lab Report INTRODUCTION
Writing is a powerful tool. Effective communication is necessary to succeed in any field. As a professional, you must communicate with both your colleagues, and the community at large. Writing is the means of showing the value of your work. The specific style of writing in science is based on the unique audience of readers. In addition, writing allows one to organize one’s thoughts and clarify ideas, and it fosters abstract thought, an ability essential in science. The ideal time to learn to write for science is now, as you are learning about science itself.

PURPOSE OF A LAB REPORT
A lab report is a form of scientific writing that adheres to some common hierarchies of organization. The specific organization/components of a lab report are discussed in this exercise. There are many types of lab reports, each written according to its intended audience. A scientist shares experimental results with the scientific community by writing a lab report in the form of a research article for publication in a scientific journal. A graduate student whose work will be reviewed by a committee of practicing scientists writes an elaborate lab report called a dissertation. The simplest kind of lab report, the kind you have probably written before, is that written by a student to summarize the events of an instructional laboratory exercise. These are written for an instructor who will assess your understanding of the scientific concepts based on your analysis of a particular experiment. Whether the lab report is simple or elaborate, the purpose is always the same -- to evaluate a hypothesis using a formal experiment. A lab report is a summary of an experiment. It provides the analysis of the experiment 's results. A successful lab report uses a straightforward style, one that employs clear and concise words and sentences to unambiguously convey your meaning to the reader. Style should reflect purpose, and if



Citations: 10 The following excerpt was taken and edited from Huenneke and Thomson (1995, p

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Bio Lab
  • Bio Lab
  • Bio Lab
  • Bio lab
  • Bio Lab
  • Bio Lab
  • Bio Lab
  • Bio Lab
  • Bio LAB
  • bio lab