Bill Of Rights Research Paper

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The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments of the United States Constitution. The Bill of Rights were created in 1791. They were written by James Madison. The bill of rights was created because of a call for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties by several states.
The bill of rights began as seventeen amendments. Twelve of those were approved by the senate. Ten of those were quickly ratified. Those ten became the basis for the basic right for every United State citizen.
The first amendment states that congress should make no law restricting or prohibiting freedom of speech, press and religion. It also allows for the right to peacefully assemble. The first amendment protect these rights unless it imposes on someone
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Congress is not allowed to make laws restricting it. This is one of the most disputed amendments in the summation of the bill of rights. One side believes it a given right while the other believes it should be limited to militias.
The third amendment is that no solider shall be quartered in any house. This is at a time of peace or war. This is without the owner’s consent. The amendment was especially important because at the time British soldiers would take homes to use for military purposes. They would do this without permission of the owner. This was a great invasion of privacy.
The fourth amendment deals with search and seizure. This amendment guards against unreasonable search and seizure. The amendment also requires any warrant to be supported by proper probable cause. This ensures that the government cannot search you or your belongings without proper proof.
The fifth amendment is there to protect against double jeopardy and self- incrimination. It also guarantees the rights to due process and grand juries. The fifth amendment basically ensures you cannot be tried for the same crime multiple times in the same jurisdiction. Also, that you no matter how guilty are guaranteed proper due
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This is one of the few amendments that is not directly applied to the state government. This is an amendment is only applicable to the federal government.
The eight amendment forbids the use of excessive bails and fines. It also ensures that no cruel or unusual punishment can be inflicted. This is highly contested because some believe the use of the death penalty is cruel and unusual. If so, the basic amendment would be directly violated each time the death penalty was an option as a punishment.
The ninth amendment states that U.S Citizen have individual rights that are not explicitly stated by the bill of rights. The federal government cannot increase its power in areas not stated. This is the amendment that ensures that even rights that are not explicitly stated are acknowledged by the Federal government.
The tenth amendment reinforces the principle of separation of powers. That certain rights are restricted to the Federal government as well as the state government. It also states that any power not guaranteed to the state government is given to the federal

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