Bibliography Chinese Immigration in Canada

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CHINESE IMMIGRANTS IN CANADA AND THEIR PROBLEMS ON THE CANADIAN LABOR MARKET

History 287 – The Chinese in Canada and Canadians in China

Bolaria, B. Singh, and Sean P. Hier. Race and Racism in 21st-century Canada: Continuity, Complexity, and Change. Peterborough, Ont.: Broadview, 2007. Print.
According to a statistics from Citizenship and Immigration Canada, the number of mainland Chinese immigrants to Canada increased impressively in the past 25 years. This has brought a significant amount of financial and human capital resources to Canada. However, the authors argue that they still have problems to get education-related professions. The main problem is to transfer their education and work experience to Canada. This results in Chinese immigrants taking jobs for which they are overqualified and overtrained. Unlike language and cultural barriers, immigrants cannot resolve this obstacle by themselves. Even though Canadian people accept “racial equality” and “democracy” as central values in society, an ethnocentric view prevails in society resulting in negative attitudes towards immigrants. The authors argue that national unity can be achieved in the context of cultural diversity. They propose the Canadian government to consider more assistance to help Chinese immigrants to adapt to Canadian society. Thereby Canada can fully benefit from international human capital transfer. This book is especially important to me since I don’t know the Canadian society well and how the situation is today. It gave me a good general overview and showed that racism is still present in society.

Canada. Senate and House of Commons of Canada. An Act Respecting Chinese Immigrants. 21 Feb. 2011. .
The Chinese Immigration Act, 1923 was an act passed by the Parliament of Canada to control and ban immigration of people of Chinese origin or descent to Canada. The act prohibited Chinese immigrants to enter Canada except they were merchant, foreign student or diplomat. The minister also

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