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Benefits of Socialized Medicine

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Benefits of Socialized Medicine
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Class XXXX, Section XXXX, Fall 2011

Outline I. Introduction 1. History of socialized medicine 2. Definition of socialized medicine II. Advantages 1. Social advantages 2. Economic advantages III. Disadvantages
1. Social disadvantages
2. Economic disadvantages IV. Conclusion

INTRODUCTION
History of socialized medicine
Socialized medicine was first introduced in Germany by Chancellor Otto von Bismarck in 1883 but was only intended for factory and mine workers. It was mandatory for these workers to get public health insurance. The policy was later extended to almost all employees in Germany by 1911. Today, almost all developed countries have socialized medicine to a high percentage. New Zealand was the first country with mixed economy to have free public health care in 1939. The United States started the first public aid program as Medicaid in the 1960’s to help poor mothers with health care which covered their children. Socialized medicine in some countries like Canada is mandatory for all workers, while in some other countries is salary dependent like in the Netherlands where employees with a certain level of income are excluded.

Definition of socialized medicine
Socialism is an economic system whereby the means of production or the products are government owned or controlled by the government. Socialized medicine is a system of providing free medical health care by government controlled financing strategies majorly taxation and insurance. The whole health sector in some cases, are operated fully or partially by the government. Public health insurance may be made mandatory or high taxes may be cut from the rich masses or employees whose income is relatively high compared to the average earning mass.

ADVANTAGES
Social advantages
The aim of the socialized medicine policy is that people who do not have the access to medical



References: Lemieux, P. (2004). Socialized medicine. IBL occasional papers. Italy. Hubert D. (1922). Supply and demand. New York: Harcourt, Brace. Gerald, C. (1999). Why Doesn’t America Have Universal Comprehensive Health Care?? Ashland Sentient Times [online] Available: http://members.peak.org/~ramselj/univ.txt John, G. (2005). Five myths of socialized medicine. Cato’s letter (3rd vol.). Washington. Available [online]: http://www.cato.org/pubs/catosletter/catosletterv3n1.pdf

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