Bend It Like Beckham and Gender Roles Essay

Topics: Culture, Bend It Like Beckham, Gender role Pages: 6 (1457 words) Published: December 4, 2014
Lana Sara 
IB English HL 
Ms. Terry  
May 18th, 2014 
“Bending” the Rules 
Cultural clashes are common in our world today. When two cultures come together, it  would become difficult to integrate without losing original traditional and cultural values.  Cultural clashes affect the lives of the younger and older generation by changing their personal  views, which causes conflicts. The younger generation would have to incorporate the values of  another culture, while still maintaining their cultural identity. This causes them to feel as if they  are not a part of any culture which leads to confusion. Whereas for the elders, they would have a  desire to keep their old traditions and culture passing down the younger generation, but often  times, the younger generation adapted to the new culture. This will lead to conflicts and  confusion between the two generations. Certain cultures encourage gender roles to try and keep  their old traditions, and some diminish them. As shown in the film Bend It Like Beckham, both  families encourage gender roles to keep their old traditions and culture, but are diminished at the  end of the film when both daughters are allowed to go to America to join the football team Santa  Clara.  

“Multicultural identities have often been described as being in ‘crisis’—the individual  does not feel fully accepted in any culture and is depicted as ‘on the border’ or ‘an outsider  within’" (Joerchel) Clashes between two entirely different cultures could lead to confusion and  misunderstanding at times. The film Bend It Like Beckham focuses on Jess’s desire to play  football and the conflict she faces due to her obligations to keep her family tradition. Jess must  either pick between pursuing football or follow her parent’s wishes which are to complete school 

Lana Sara 
IB English HL 
Ms. Terry  
May 18th, 2014 
and marry an Indian man. As Jess is trying to find her own identity without losing her family, she  meets a footballer named Jules. Jule’s family is parallel to Jess’s family. Jules also struggles with  her mother telling her not to be involved in football because it’s a “guys sport” and instead be  involved in more feminine things, saying "no boy's gonna go out with a girl who's got bigger  muscles than him!".  

Not only is the younger generation affected by cultural clashes, but also the elders. As the  younger generation or the kids of the elders grow up in a different culture that supports different  ideas, teachings, and religion, it becomes difficult for the elders to keep the young within their  own traditions. The younger generation will become influenced by school, friends, and the  media, and will ultimately blend in with the new culture. Throughout the movie, Jess’s mother is  often seen praying to a picture of an old man with a long white beard. The man is Guru Nanak,  the founder of Sikhism. When Jess’s mother is praying to Nanak for “A­level­results” on Jess’s  exam, Jess tells her mother to “hurry up”. While the mother takes her religion seriously, Jess is  very disinterested. “Her Sikh parents have a shrine to an ancestor over their fireplace, but Jess  forgoes the traditions of her parents by enshrining David Beckham.”(Clarke)  In the film, Jess is experiencing integration with the British culture. Although Jess  doesn’t want to follow her Indian traditions and culture, she doesn’t want to completely abandon  her cultural identity either. While Jess’s family doesn’t want to fully accept the British culture,  they eventually will have to adapt to it. Her family has a hard time understanding her because  they have chosen to remain separated from the British community. Jess’s parents are afraid the 

Lana Sara 
IB English HL 
Ms. Terry  
May 18th, 2014 
living in a different country, with different culture and tradition, will influence the behaviors of  their daughters. Throughout the movie, Jess’s parents are ethnocentric. They consider their ...

References: Gold, Daniel (1996).The construction of religious boundaries: culture, identity, and 
diversity in Sikh tradition. . The Journal of the American Oriental Society. 116, 586­588.  
Newspapers, 15 Sept. 2012. Web. 18 May 2014. 
4.
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • "Bend it like Beckham" Essay
  • Bend it Like Beckham Essay
  • Bend It Like Beckham Essay
  • Bend It Like Beckham Essay
  • Bend it like Beckham Research Paper
  • Gender Issue in Bend It Like Beckham Essay
  • Essay on The Gender Roles In Bend It Like Beckham
  • Bend It Like Beckham Cultural Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free