Belmont Report Respect For Persons

Satisfactory Essays
According to the Belmont Report, Respect for Persons is divided into two ethical convictions: that individuals should be treated as autonomous agents, and that persons with diminished autonomy are entitled to protection.

• The Belmont report was made to counteract future unfortunate behavior. The report noted three noteworthy criteria for the assessment of research including human subjects.

• According to the Belmont Report, Respect for Persons is divided into two ethical convictions: that individuals should be treated as autonomous agents, and that persons with diminished autonomy are entitled to protection.

• Beneficence, as noted by the Belmont Report, requires that persons are treated in an ethical manner not only by respecting their

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