Being A Deaf Child Essay

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In my first paper, I had mentioned that I would be accepting if I had a deaf child. I also brought up my consideration in adopting a deaf child. If other parents do not want to raise the child, I would be willing to step in and love them as my own. I stand by both of those statements I made and I still feel strongly about them, but the more I learned in this class, the more I realized it would not be as easy as I thought. Originally, I wanted to send my child to a mainstream school or live close to an active Deaf community, but now I know how crucial residential schools are. Even though I would not like the idea of sending my child away to school and not having them around all the time, I would have to think about what is best for the child …show more content…
Websites such as “Raising Deaf Kids” and “Raising and Educating Deaf Children” offer information on schools, communicating, and even provides stories from other parents who have raised children with hearing loss. These are the kinds of information that needs to be shared with parents, rather than giving them one side of hearing loss, the bad side. There are also a number of books that can offer advice, but there are no two same situations. Each child is unique and deserves to be recognized that way. What works for one family might not work for …show more content…
They form in metropolitan areas and thrive like utopias. They form near Deaf schools or places were access to information is easy. If I were to have a deaf child, I would want them to be Deaf and be proud. I would explain “Deaf Gain” and introduce them into a visual world where they have total access to communication. The child has the right to learn and I will let them decide on their education, language, and anything concerning the child. I will always let them know that I have their best interest at heart and I want what’s best for that child. My family would work as a team to make decisions and I will always make sure my Deaf child knows how loved they

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