Beauty through History

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How has perception of beauty has changed
How has the perception of beauty changed through time? There have been many different views of beauty from the renaissance years to the modern day views on what beauty is, it is very intriguing to know why people see beauty in those ways and why it has changed - from curvaceous to thin, from pale to sun tanned, beauty has changed in so many ways we probably wouldn’t imagine.
Starting in the renaissance years (1400s – 1600s) the large, and in today’s opinion obese, women were considered the most beautiful – it symbolised wealth and good health while thin women were seen as odd. Blondes were considered the most attractive, pale skin was preferred and lips were made to look deep red. Women dressed in fine satins and silk covered in jewels and ruffles.
In the Victorian Era (1837 – 1901) women were much more body aware and the slimmest waist was seen as the best – meaning corsets were undeniably in! They were wound so tight, breathing and sitting were next to impossible – broken ribs were caused by this. The economy rose and with that the ability to create more intricate clothing began. Bustles, hoops and layered petticoats were all popular. High class women did not use a lot of make-up although they drank vinegar and avoided fresh air to stay pale, Christians believing make-up to be the look of the devil and left for prostitutes and actresses.
In the 1920’s fashion changed along with women’s roles, in particular the idea of freedom. A boyish look was in – women tried to hide their curves, some even bound their chest. The loose dresses, quite different to the Victorian corsets – were the most fashionable outfits. “Not everyone was pleased with the decade's free and easy fashions.” (Delia Deleest, http://unusualhistoricals.blogspot.com.au/2007/11/standards-of-beauty-1920s-fashion.html) A short bob haircut or finger waves, bold make-up, powder to look pale, dramatic pencilled eyebrows and dark lipstick was considered

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